20 U.S. Code § 2355. Local uses of funds

prev next
(a) General authority

Each eligible recipient that receives funds under this part shall use such funds to improve career and technical education programs.

(b) Requirements for uses of fundsFunds made available to eligible recipients under this part shall be used to support career and technical education programs that—
(1) strengthen the academic and career and technical skills of students participating in career and technical education programs, by strengthening the academic and career and technical education components of such programs through the integration of academics with career and technical education programs through a coherent sequence of courses, such as career and technical programs of study described in section 2342(c)(1)(A) of this title, to ensure learning in—
(A)
a well-rounded education (as defined in section 7801 of this title); and
(2)
link career and technical education at the secondary level and career and technical education at the postsecondary level, including by offering the relevant elements of not less than 1 career and technical program of study described in section 2342(c)(1)(A) of this title;
(3)
provide students with strong experience in and understanding of all aspects of an industry, which may include work-based learning experiences;
(4) develop, improve, or expand the use of technology in career and technical education, which may include—
(A)
training of career and technical education teachers, faculty, and administrators to use technology, which may include distance learning;
(B)
providing career and technical education students with the academic and career and technical skills (including the mathematics and science knowledge that provides a strong basis for such skills) that lead to entry into the technology fields; or
(C)
encouraging schools to collaborate with technology industries to offer voluntary internships and mentoring programs, including programs that improve the mathematics and science knowledge of students;
(5) provide professional development programs that are consistent with section 2342 of this title to secondary and postsecondary teachers, faculty, administrators, and career guidance and academic counselors who are involved in integrated career and technical education programs, including—
(A) in-service and preservice training on—
(i)
effective integration and use of challenging academic and career and technical education provided jointly with academic teachers to the extent practicable;
(ii)
effective teaching skills based on research that includes promising practices;
(iii)
effective practices to improve parental and community involvement; and
(iv)
effective use of scientifically based research and data to improve instruction;
(B)
support of education programs for teachers of career and technical education in public schools and other public school personnel who are involved in the direct delivery of educational services to career and technical education students, to ensure that such teachers and personnel stay current with all aspects of an industry;
(C)
internship programs that provide relevant business experience; and
(D)
programs designed to train teachers specifically in the effective use and application of technology to improve instruction;
(6)
develop and implement evaluations of the career and technical education programs carried out with funds under this subchapter, including an assessment of how the needs of special populations are being met;
(7)
initiate, improve, expand, and modernize quality career and technical education programs, including relevant technology;
(8)
provide services and activities that are of sufficient size, scope, and quality to be effective; and
(9)
provide activities to prepare special populations, including single parents and displaced homemakers who are enrolled in career and technical education programs, for high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations that will lead to self-sufficiency.
(c) PermissiveFunds made available to an eligible recipient under this subchapter may be used—
(1)
to involve parents, businesses, and labor organizations as appropriate, in the design, implementation, and evaluation of career and technical education programs authorized under this subchapter, including establishing effective programs and procedures to enable informed and effective participation in such programs;
(2) to provide career guidance and academic counseling, which may include information described in section 2328 of this title, for students participating in career and technical education programs, that—
(A)
improves graduation rates and provides information on postsecondary and career options, including baccalaureate degree programs, for secondary students, which activities may include the use of graduation and career plans; and
(B)
provides assistance for postsecondary students, including for adult students who are changing careers or updating skills;
(3) for local education and business (including small business) partnerships, including for—
(A)
work-related experiences for students, such as internships, cooperative education, school-based enterprises, entrepreneurship, and job shadowing that are related to career and technical education programs;
(B)
adjunct faculty arrangements for qualified industry professionals; and
(C)
industry experience for teachers and faculty;
(4)
to provide programs for special populations;
(6)
for mentoring and support services;
(7)
for leasing, purchasing, upgrading or adapting equipment, including instructional aids and publications (including support for library resources) designed to strengthen and support academic and technical skill achievement;
(8)
for teacher preparation programs that address the integration of academic and career and technical education and that assist individuals who are interested in becoming career and technical education teachers and faculty, including individuals with experience in business and industry;
(9)
to develop and expand postsecondary program offerings at times and in formats that are accessible for students, including working students, including through the use of distance education;
(10) to develop initiatives that facilitate the transition of subbaccalaureate career and technical education students into baccalaureate degree programs, including—
(B)
postsecondary dual and concurrent enrollment programs;
(C)
academic and financial aid counseling for sub-baccalaureate career and technical education students that informs the students of the opportunities for pursuing a baccalaureate degree and advises the students on how to meet any transfer requirements; and
(D) other initiatives—
(i)
to encourage the pursuit of a baccalaureate degree; and
(ii)
to overcome barriers to enrollment in and completion of baccalaureate degree programs, including geographic and other barriers affecting rural students and special populations;
(11)
to provide activities to support entrepreneurship education and training;
(12)
for improving or developing new career and technical education courses, including the development of new proposed career and technical programs of study for consideration by the eligible agency and courses that prepare individuals academically and technically for high skill, high wage, or high demand occupations and dual or concurrent enrollment opportunities by which career and technical education students at the secondary level could obtain postsecondary credit to count towards an associate or baccalaureate degree;
(13)
to develop and support small, personalized career-themed learning communities;
(14)
to provide support for family and consumer sciences programs;
(15)
to provide career and technical education programs for adults and school dropouts to complete the secondary school education, or upgrade the technical skills, of the adults and school dropouts;
(16)
to provide assistance to individuals who have participated in services and activities under this chapter in continuing their education or training or finding an appropriate job, such as through referral to the system established under section 3151 of title 29;
(17)
to support training and activities (such as mentoring and outreach) in non-traditional fields;
(18)
to provide support for training programs in automotive technologies;
(19) to pool a portion of such funds with a portion of funds available to not less than 1 other eligible recipient for innovative initiatives, which may include—
(A)
improving the initial preparation and professional development of career and technical education teachers, faculty, administrators, and counselors;
(B) establishing, enhancing, or supporting systems for—
(i)
accountability data collection under this chapter; or
(ii)
reporting data under this chapter;
(C)
implementing career and technical programs of study described in section 2342(c)(1)(A) of this title; or
(D)
implementing technical assessments; and
(20)
to support other career and technical education activities that are consistent with the purpose of this chapter.
(d) Administrative costs

Each eligible recipient receiving funds under this part shall not use more than 5 percent of the funds for administrative costs associated with the administration of activities assisted under this section.

Amendment of Section

Pub. L. 115–224, § 4, title I, § 134, July 31, 2018, 132 Stat. 1564, 1616, provided that, effective July 1, 2019, this section is amended to read as follows:

§ 2355. Local uses of funds

(a) General authority

Each eligible recipient that receives funds under this part shall use such funds to develop, coordinate, implement, or improve career and technical education programs to meet the needs identified in the comprehensive needs assessment described in section 2354(c) of this title.

(b) Requirements for uses of funds

Funds made available to eligible recipients under this part shall be used to support career and technical education programs that are of sufficient size, scope, and quality to be effective and that—

(1) provide career exploration and career development activities through an organized, systematic framework designed to aid students, including in the middle grades, before enrolling and while participating in a career and technical education program, in making informed plans and decisions about future education and career opportunities and programs of study, which may include—

(A) introductory courses or activities focused on career exploration and career awareness, including non-traditional fields;

(B) readily available career and labor market information, including information on—

(i) occupational supply and demand;

(ii) educational requirements;

(iii) other information on careers aligned to State, local, or Tribal (as applicable) economic priorities; and

(iv) employment sectors;

(C) programs and activities related to the development of student graduation and career plans;

(D) career guidance and academic counselors that provide information on postsecondary education and career options;

(E) any other activity that advances knowledge of career opportunities and assists students in making informed decisions about future education and employment goals, including non-traditional fields; or

(F) providing students with strong experience in, and comprehensive understanding of, all aspects of an industry;

(2) provide professional development for teachers, faculty, school leaders, administrators, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, or paraprofessionals, which may include—

(A) professional development on supporting individualized academic and career and technical education instructional approaches, including the integration of academic and career and technical education standards and curricula;

(B) professional development on ensuring labor market information is used to inform the programs, guidance, and advisement offered to students, including information provided under section 49l–2(e)(2)(C) of title 29;

(C) providing teachers, faculty, school leaders, administrators, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, or paraprofessionals, as appropriate, with opportunities to advance knowledge, skills, and understanding of all aspects of an industry, including the latest workplace equipment, technologies, standards, and credentials;

(D) supporting school leaders and administrators in managing career and technical education programs in the schools, institutions, or local educational agencies of such school leaders or administrators;

(E) supporting the implementation of strategies to improve student achievement and close gaps in student participation and performance in career and technical education programs;

(F) providing teachers, faculty, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, principals, school leaders, or paraprofessionals, as appropriate, with opportunities to advance knowledge, skills, and understanding in pedagogical practices, including, to the extent the eligible recipient determines that such evidence is reasonably available, evidence-based pedagogical practices;

(G) training teachers, faculty, school leaders, administrators, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, or paraprofessionals, as appropriate, to provide appropriate accommodations for individuals with disabilities, and students with disabilities who are provided accommodations under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (29 U.S.C. 701 et seq.) or the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

(H) training teachers, faculty, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, and paraprofessionals in frameworks to effectively teach students, including a particular focus on students with disabilities and English learners, which may include universal design for learning, multi-tier systems of supports, and positive behavioral interventions and support; or

(I) training for the effective use of community spaces that provide access to tools, technology, and knowledge for learners and entrepreneurs, such as makerspaces or libraries;

(3) provide within career and technical education the skills necessary to pursue careers in high-skill, high-wage, or in-demand industry sectors or occupations;

(4) support integration of academic skills into career and technical education programs and programs of study to support—

(A) CTE participants at the secondary school level in meeting the challenging State academic standards adopted under section 6311(b)(1) of this title by the State in which the eligible recipient is located; and

(B) CTE participants at the postsecondary level in achieving academic skills;

(5) plan and carry out elements that support the implementation of career and technical education programs and programs of study and that result in increasing student achievement of the local levels of performance established under section 2323 of this title, which may include—

(A) a curriculum aligned with the requirements for a program of study;

(B) sustainable relationships among education, business and industry, and other community stakeholders, including industry or sector partnerships in the local area, where applicable, that are designed to facilitate the process of continuously updating and aligning programs of study with skills that are in demand in the State, regional, or local economy, and in collaboration with business outreach staff in one-stop centers, as defined in section 3 of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3102), and other appropriate organizations, including community-based and youth-serving organizations;

(C) where appropriate, expanding opportunities for CTE concentrators to participate in accelerated learning programs (as described in section 7114(b)(3)(A)(i)(IV) of this title, including dual or concurrent enrollment programs, early college high schools, and the development or implementation of articulation agreements as part of a career and technical education program of study;

(D) appropriate equipment, technology, and instructional materials (including support for library resources) aligned with business and industry needs, including machinery, testing equipment, tools, implements, hardware and software, and other new and emerging instructional materials;

(E) a continuum of work-based learning opportunities, including simulated work environments;

(F) industry-recognized certification examinations or other assessments leading toward a recognized postsecondary credential;

(G) efforts to recruit and retain career and technical education program teachers, faculty, school leaders, administrators, specialized instructional support personnel, career guidance and academic counselors, and paraprofessionals;

(H) where applicable, coordination with other education and workforce development programs and initiatives, including career pathways and sector partnerships developed under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (29 U.S.C. 3101 et seq.) and other Federal laws and initiatives that provide students with transition-related services, including the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act;

(I) expanding opportunities for students to participate in distance career and technical education and blended-learning programs;

(J) expanding opportunities for students to participate in competency-based education programs;

(K) improving career guidance and academic counseling programs that assist students in making informed academic and career and technical education decisions, including academic and financial aid counseling;

(L) supporting the integration of employability skills into career and technical education programs and programs of study, including through family and consumer science programs;

(M) supporting programs and activities that increase access, student engagement, and success in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields (including computer science and architecture) for students who are members of groups underrepresented in such subject fields;

(N) providing career and technical education, in a school or other educational setting, for adults or out-of-school youth to complete secondary school education or upgrade technical skills;

(O) supporting career and technical student organizations, including student preparation for and participation in technical skills competitions aligned with career and technical education program standards and curricula;

(P) making all forms of instructional content widely available, which may include use of open educational resources;

(Q) supporting the integration of arts and design skills, when appropriate, into career and technical education programs and programs of study;

(R) partnering with a qualified intermediary to improve training, the development of public-private partnerships, systems development, capacity-building, and scalability of the delivery of high-quality career and technical education;

(S) support to reduce or eliminate out-of-pocket expenses for special populations participating in career and technical education, including those participating in dual or concurrent enrollment programs or early college high school programs, and supporting the costs associated with fees, transportation, child care, or mobility challenges for those special populations; or

(T) other activities to improve career and technical education programs; and

(6) develop and implement evaluations of the activities carried out with funds under this part, including evaluations necessary to complete the comprehensive needs assessment required under section 2354(c) of this title and the local report required under section 2323(b)(4)(B) of this title.

(c) Pooling funds

An eligible recipient may pool a portion of funds received under this chapter with a portion of funds received under this chapter available to one or more eligible recipients to support implementation of programs of study through the activities described in subsection (b)(2).

(d) Administrative costs

Each eligible recipient receiving funds under this part shall not use more than 5 percent of such funds for costs associated with the administration of activities under this section.

See 2018 Amendment note below.

Prior Provisions

A prior section 2355, Pub. L. 88–210, title I, § 135, as added Pub. L. 105–332, § 1(b), Oct. 31, 1998, 112 Stat. 3115, related to local uses of funds, prior to the general amendment of this chapter by Pub. L. 109–270.

Prior sections 2361 to 2363 were omitted in the general amendment of this chapter by Pub. L. 105–332.

Section 2361, Pub. L. 88–210, title III, § 311, as added Pub. L. 98–524, § 1, Oct. 19, 1984, 98 Stat. 2458; amended Pub. L. 99–159, title VII, § 706(b), Nov. 22, 1985, 99 Stat. 906; Pub. L. 101–392, title III, § 302, Sept. 25, 1990, 104 Stat. 786, related to consumer and homemaking education grants.

Section 2362, Pub. L. 88–210, title III, § 312, as added Pub. L. 98–524, § 1, Oct. 19, 1984, 98 Stat. 2458; amended Pub. L. 99–159, title VII, § 706(c), Nov. 22, 1985, 99 Stat. 906; Pub. L. 101–392, title III, § 303, Sept. 25, 1990, 104 Stat. 786, related to use of funds from consumer and homemaking education grants.

Section 2363, Pub. L. 88–210, title III, § 313, as added Pub. L. 98–524, § 1, Oct. 19, 1984, 98 Stat. 2459; amended Pub. L. 99–159, title VII, § 707, Nov. 22, 1985, 99 Stat. 906; Pub. L. 101–392, title III, § 304, Sept. 25, 1990, 104 Stat. 786, related to information dissemination and leadership.

Amendments

2018—Pub. L. 115–224 amended section generally. Prior to amendment, section related to local uses of funds, including required and permissive uses.

2015—Subsec. (b)(1)(A). Pub. L. 114–95 substituted “a well-rounded education (as defined in section 7801 of this title)” for “the core academic subjects (as defined in section 7801 of this title)”.

2014—Subsec. (c)(16). Pub. L. 113–128 substituted “such as through referral to the system established under section 3151 of title 29” for “such as through referral to the system established under section 2841 of title 29”.

Effective Date of 2018 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 115–224 effective July 1, 2019, see section 4 of Pub. L. 115–224, set out as a note under section 2301 of this title.

Effective Date of 2015 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 114–95 effective Dec. 10, 2015, except with respect to certain noncompetitive programs and competitive programs, see section 5 of Pub. L. 114–95, set out as a note under section 6301 of this title.

Effective Date of 2014 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 113–128 effective on the first day of the first full program year after July 22, 2014 (July 1, 2015), see section 506 of Pub. L. 113–128, set out as an Effective Date note under section 3101 of Title 29, Labor.