50 U.S. Code § 3021 - National Security Council

§ 3021.
National Security Council
(a) National Security Council

There is a council known as the National Security Council (in this section referred to as the “Council”).

(b) FunctionsConsistent with the direction of the President, the functions of the Council shall be to—
(1)
advise the President with respect to the integration of domestic, foreign, and military policies relating to the national security so as to enable the Armed Forces and the other departments and agencies of the United States Government to cooperate more effectively in matters involving the national security;
(2)
assess and appraise the objectives, commitments, and risks of the United States in relation to the actual and potential military power of the United States, and make recommendations thereon to the President; and
(3)
make recommendations to the President concerning policies on matters of common interest to the departments and agencies of the United States Government concerned with the national security.
(c) Membership
(1) In general

The Council consists of the President, the Vice President, the Secretary of State, the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Energy, and such other officers of the United States Government as the President may designate.

(2) Attendance and participation in meetings

The President may designate such other officers of the United States Government as the President considers appropriate, including the Director of National Intelligence, the Director of National Drug Control Policy, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to attend and participate in meetings of the Council.

(d) Presiding officers

At meetings of the Council, the President shall preside or, in the absence of the President, a member of the Council designated by the President shall preside.

(e) Staff
(1) In general

The Council shall have a staff headed by a civilian executive secretary appointed by the President.

(2) Staff

Consistent with the direction of the President and subject to paragraph (3), the executive secretary may, subject to the civil service laws and chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of title 5, appoint and fix the compensation of such personnel as may be necessary to perform such duties as may be prescribed by the President in connection with performance of the functions of the Council.

(3) Number of professional staff

The professional staff for which this subsection provides shall not exceed 200 persons, including persons employed by, assigned to, detailed to, under contract to serve on, or otherwise serving or affiliated with the staff. The limitation in this paragraph does not apply to personnel serving substantially in support or administrative positions.

(f) Special Advisor to the President on International Religious Freedom

It is the sense of Congress that there should be within the staff of the Council a Special Adviser to the President on International Religious Freedom, whose position should be comparable to that of a director within the Executive Office of the President. The Special Adviser should serve as a resource for executive branch officials, compiling and maintaining information on the facts and circumstances of violations of religious freedom (as defined in section 6402 of title 22), and making policy recommendations. The Special Adviser should serve as liaison with the Ambassador at Large for International Religious Freedom, the United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, Congress and, as advisable, religious nongovernmental organizations.

(July 26, 1947, ch. 343, title I, § 101, 61 Stat. 496; Aug. 10, 1949, ch. 412, § 3, 63 Stat. 579; Oct. 28, 1949, ch. 782, title XI, § 1106(a), 63 Stat. 972; Oct. 10, 1951, ch. 479, title V, § 501(e)(1), 65 Stat. 378; Pub. L. 99–433, title II, § 203, Oct. 1, 1986, 100 Stat. 1011; Pub. L. 99–500, § 101(c) [title IX, § 9115(f)], Oct. 18, 1986, 100 Stat. 1783–82, 1783–125, and Pub. L. 99–591, § 101(c) [title IX, § 9115(f)], Oct. 30, 1986, 100 Stat. 3341–82, 3341–125; Pub. L. 99–661, div. A, title XIII, § 1311(f), Nov. 14, 1986, 100 Stat. 3986; Pub. L. 100–690, title I, § 1003(a)(3), Nov. 18, 1988, 102 Stat. 4182; Pub. L. 102–496, title VII, § 703, Oct. 24, 1992, 106 Stat. 3189; Pub. L. 104–293, title VIII, §§ 802, 804, Oct. 11, 1996, 110 Stat. 3474, 3476; Pub. L. 105–277, div. C, title VII, § 713(b), Oct. 21, 1998, 112 Stat. 2681–693; Pub. L. 105–292, title III, § 301, Oct. 27, 1998, 112 Stat. 2800; Pub. L. 108–458, title I, §§ 1071(a)(1)(A)–(D), 1072(a)(1), Dec. 17, 2004, 118 Stat. 3689, 3692; Pub. L. 110–53, title XVIII, § 1841(g), Aug. 3, 2007, 121 Stat. 500; Pub. L. 110–140, title IX, § 932, Dec. 19, 2007, 121 Stat. 1740; Pub. L. 113–126, title VII, § 702, July 7, 2014, 128 Stat. 1422; Pub. L. 114–328, div. A, title X, § 1085(a), Dec. 23, 2016, 130 Stat. 2422.)
Codification

Section was formerly classified to section 402 of this title prior to editorial reclassification and renumbering as this section.

Pub. L. 99–591 is a corrected version of Pub. L. 99–500.

Amendments

2016—Pub. L. 114–328 amended section generally. Prior to amendment, section related to the National Security Council.

2014—Subsec. (a)(5) to (8). Pub. L. 113–126 substituted “; and” for semicolon at end of par. (5), redesignated par. (8) as (6) and struck out “the Chairman of the Munitions Board, and the Chairman of the Research and Development Board,” after “military departments,”, and struck out former pars. (6) and (7) which read as follows:

“(6) the Director for Mutual Security;

“(7) the Chairman of the National Security Resources Board; and”.

2007—Subsec. (a)(5) to (8). Pub. L. 110–140 added par. (5) and redesignated former pars. (5) to (7) as (6) to (8), respectively.

Subsecs. (i), (k). Pub. L. 110–53, § 1841(g)(1), redesignated subsec. (i), relating to Special Adviser to the President on International Religious Freedom, as (k).

Subsec. (l). Pub. L. 110–53, § 1841(g)(2), added subsec. (l).

2004—Subsec. (h)(2)(A). Pub. L. 108–458, § 1071(a)(1)(A), substituted “Director of National Intelligence” for “Director of Central Intelligence”.

Subsec. (h)(5). Pub. L. 108–458, § 1071(a)(1)(B), substituted “Director of National Intelligence” for “Director of Central Intelligence”.

Subsec. (i)(2)(A). Pub. L. 108–458, § 1071(a)(1)(C), substituted “Director of National Intelligence” for “Director of Central Intelligence”.

Subsec. (j). Pub. L. 108–458, § 1072(a)(1), substituted “Principal Deputy Director of National Intelligence” for “Deputy Director of Central Intelligence”.

Pub. L. 108–458, § 1071(a)(1)(D), substituted “Director of National Intelligence” for “Director of Central Intelligence”.

1998—Subsecs. (f), (g). Pub. L. 105–277 added subsec. (f) and redesignated former subsec. (f) as (g).

Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 105–292 added subsec. (i) relating to Special Adviser to the President on International Religious Freedom.

1996—Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 104–293, § 802(2), added subsec. (h). Former subsec. (h) redesignated (j).

Subsec. (i). Pub. L. 104–293, § 804, added subsec. (i).

Subsec. (j). Pub. L. 104–293, § 802(1), redesignated subsec. (h) as (j).

1992—Subsec. (h). Pub. L. 102–496 added subsec. (h).

1988—Subsecs. (f), (g). Pub. L. 100–690, §§ 1003(a)(3), 1009, temporarily added subsec. (f), relating to participation by Director of National Drug Control Policy in meetings of National Security Council, and redesignated former subsec. (f) as (g). See Effective and Termination Dates of 1988 Amendment note below.

1986—Subsec. (e). Pub. L. 99–433 added subsec. (e).

Subsec. (f). Pub. L. 99–500, Pub. L. 99–591, and Pub. L. 99–661 amended section identically adding subsec. (f).

1951—Subsec. (a). Act Oct. 10, 1951, inserted cl. (5) relating to Director for Mutual Security, in fourth paragraph, and renumbered former cls. (5) and (6) thereof as cls. (6) and (7), respectively.

1949—Subsec. (a). Act Aug. 10, 1949, added the Vice President to the Council, removed the Secretaries of the military departments, to authorize the President to add, with the consent of the Senate, Secretaries and Under Secretaries of other executive departments and of the military department, and the Chairmen of the Munitions Board and the Research and Development Board.

Subsec. (c). Act Oct. 28, 1949, substituted “Classification Act of 1949” for “Classification Act of 1923, as amended”.

Effective Date of 2016 Amendment

Pub. L. 114–328, div. A, title X, § 1085(b), Dec. 23, 2016, 130 Stat. 2423, provided that:

“The limitation on the number of professional staff of the National Security Council specified in subsection (e)(3) of section 101 of the National Security Act of 1947 [this section], as amended by subsection (a) of this section, shall take effect on the date that is 18 months after the date of the enactment of this Act [Dec. 23, 2016].”

Effective Date of 2007 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 110–140 effective on the date that is 1 day after Dec. 19, 2007, see section 1601 of Pub. L. 110–140, set out as an Effective Date note under section 1824 of Title 2, The Congress.

Effective Date of 2004 Amendment

For Determination by President that amendment by Pub. L. 108–458 take effect on Apr. 21, 2005, see Memorandum of President of the United States, Apr. 21, 2005, 70 F.R. 23925, set out as a note under section 3001 of this title.

Amendment by Pub. L. 108–458 effective not later than six months after Dec. 17, 2004, except as otherwise expressly provided, see section 1097(a) of Pub. L. 108–458, set out in an Effective Date of 2004 Amendment; Transition Provisions note under section 3001 of this title.

Effective and Termination Dates of 1988 Amendment

Amendment by Pub. L. 100–690 effective Jan. 21, 1989, and repealed on Sept. 30, 1997, see sections 1012 and 1009, respectively, of Pub. L. 100–690.

Repeals

Act Oct. 28, 1949, ch. 782, cited as a credit to this section, was repealed (subject to a savings clause) by Pub. L. 89–554, Sept. 6, 1966, § 8, 80 Stat. 632, 655.

Transfer of Functions

Office of Director for Mutual Security abolished and functions of Director, including those as a member of National Security Council, transferred to Director of Foreign Operations Administration by Reorg. Plan No. 7 of 1953, eff. Aug. 1, 1953, 18 F.R. 4541, set out in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees. Foreign Operations Administration abolished by Ex. Ord. No. 10610, May 9, 1955, 20 F.R. 3179, and its functions and offices transferred to Department of State to be administered by International Cooperation Administration. For later transfer, see section 2381 of Title 22, Foreign Relations and Intercourse, and notes set out under that section.

National Security Resources Board, together with Office of Chairman, abolished by section 6 of Reorg. Plan No. 3 of 1953, eff. June 12, 1953, 18 F.R. 3375,67 Stat. 634, set out under section 3042 of this title. Functions of Chairman with limited exception, including his functions as a member of National Security Council transferred to Office of Defense Mobilization by section 2(a) of Reorg. Plan No. 3 of 1953. Functions of Director of Office of Defense Mobilization with respect to being a member of National Security Council transferred to Director of Office of Civil and Defense Mobilization by Reorg. Plan No. 1 of 1958, § 4, eff. July 1, 1958, 23 F.R. 4991,72 Stat. 1799, as amended by Pub. L. 85–763, Aug. 26, 1958, 72 Stat. 861, set out as a note under section 5195 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare. For subsequent transfers or delegations to Office of Emergency Planning, Office of Emergency Preparedness, President, Federal Preparedness Agency, and Secretary of Homeland Security, see Transfer of Functions notes set out under section 3042 of this title.

Munitions Board, together with office of Chairman, abolished by section 2 of Reorg. Plan No. 6 of 1953, eff. June 30, 1953, 18 F.R. 3743,67 Stat. 638, set out in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees. All functions vested in Munitions Board transferred to Secretary of Defense by section 1(a) of Reorg. Plan No. 6 of 1953.

Research and Development Board, together with office of Chairman, abolished by section 2 of Reorg. Plan No. 6 of 1953, eff. June 30, 1953, 18 F.R. 3743,67 Stat. 638, set out in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees. Functions vested in Board transferred to Secretary of Defense by section 1(a) of Reorg. Plan No. 6 of 1953.

National Security Council, together with its functions, records, property, personnel, and unexpended balances of appropriations, allocations, and other funds (available or to be made available) transferred to Executive Office of President by Reorg. Plan No. 4 of 1949, eff. Aug. 20, 1949, 14 F.R. 5227,63 Stat. 1067, set out in the Appendix to Title 5, Government Organization and Employees.

Rule of Construction for Duplicate Authorization and Appropriation Provisions of Public Laws 99–500, 99–591, and 99–661

For rule of construction for certain duplicate provisions of Public Laws 99–500, 99–591, and 99–661, see section 6 of Pub. L. 100–26, set out as a note under section 2302 of Title 10, Armed Forces.

Section as Unaffected by Repeals

Repeals by section 542(a) of Mutual Security Act of 1954 did not repeal amendment to this section by act Oct. 10, 1951.

Pilot Program on Cryptologic Service Training

Pub. L. 108–375, div. A, title IX, § 922, Oct. 28, 2004, 118 Stat. 2029, which authorized the Director of the National Security Agency to carry out a pilot program on cryptologic service training for the intelligence community, was repealed by Pub. L. 111–259, title III, § 313(b)(1)(C), Oct. 7, 2010, 124 Stat. 2666.

Executive Order No. 10483

Ex. Ord. No. 10483, Sept. 2, 1953, 18 F.R. 5379, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 10598, Feb. 28, 1955, 20 F.R. 1237, which provided for an Operations Coordinating Board, was superseded by Ex. Ord. No. 10700, Feb. 25, 1957, formerly set out below.

Executive Order No. 10700

Ex. Ord. No. 10700, Feb. 25, 1957, 22 F.R. 1111, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 10773, July 1, 1958, 23 F.R. 5061; Ex. Ord. No. 10782, Sept. 6, 1958, 23 F.R. 6971; Ex. Ord. 10838, Sept. 16, 1959, 24 F.R. 7519, which provided for the Operations Coordinating Board, was revoked by Ex. Ord. No. 10920, Feb. 18, 1961, 26 F.R. 1463.

Ex. Ord. No. 13228. Establishing the Office of Homeland Security and the Homeland Security Council

Ex. Ord. No. 13228, Oct. 8, 2001, 66 F.R. 51812, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 13284, § 3, Jan. 23, 2003, 68 F.R. 4075; Ex. Ord. No. 13286, § 8, Feb. 28, 2003, 68 F.R. 10622, provided:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Establishment. I hereby establish within the Executive Office of the President an Office of Homeland Security (the “Office”) to be headed by the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security.

Sec. 2. Mission. The mission of the Office shall be to develop and coordinate the implementation of a comprehensive national strategy to secure the United States from terrorist threats or attacks. The Office shall perform the functions necessary to carry out this mission, including the functions specified in section 3 of this order.

Sec. 3. Functions. The functions of the Office shall be to coordinate the executive branch’s efforts to detect, prepare for, prevent, protect against, respond to, and recover from terrorist attacks within the United States.

(a) National Strategy. The Office shall work with executive departments and agencies, State and local governments, and private entities to ensure the adequacy of the national strategy for detecting, preparing for, preventing, protecting against, responding to, and recovering from terrorist threats or attacks within the United States and shall periodically review and coordinate revisions to that strategy as necessary.

(b) Detection. The Office shall identify priorities and coordinate efforts for collection and analysis of information within the United States regarding threats of terrorism against the United States and activities of terrorists or terrorist groups within the United States. The Office also shall identify, in coordination with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, priorities for collection of intelligence outside the United States regarding threats of terrorism within the United States.

(i) In performing these functions, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, as appropriate, to:

(A) facilitate collection from State and local governments and private entities of information pertaining to terrorist threats or activities within the United States;

(B) coordinate and prioritize the requirements for foreign intelligence relating to terrorism within the United States of executive departments and agencies responsible for homeland security and provide these requirements and priorities to the Director of Central Intelligence and other agencies responsible for collection of foreign intelligence;

(C) coordinate efforts to ensure that all executive departments and agencies that have intelligence collection responsibilities have sufficient technological capabilities and resources to collect intelligence and data relating to terrorist activities or possible terrorist acts within the United States, working with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, as appropriate;

(D) coordinate development of monitoring protocols and equipment for use in detecting the release of biological, chemical, and radiological hazards; and

(E) ensure that, to the extent permitted by law, all appropriate and necessary intelligence and law enforcement information relating to homeland security is disseminated to and exchanged among appropriate executive departments and agencies responsible for homeland security and, where appropriate for reasons of homeland security, promote exchange of such information with and among State and local governments and private entities.

(ii) Executive departments and agencies shall, to the extent permitted by law, make available to the Office all information relating to terrorist threats and activities within the United States.

(c) Preparedness. The Office of Homeland Security shall coordinate national efforts to prepare for and mitigate the consequences of terrorist threats or attacks within the United States. In performing this function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i) review and assess the adequacy of the portions of all Federal emergency response plans that pertain to terrorist threats or attacks within the United States;

(ii) coordinate domestic exercises and simulations designed to assess and practice systems that would be called upon to respond to a terrorist threat or attack within the United States and coordinate programs and activities for training Federal, State, and local employees who would be called upon to respond to such a threat or attack;

(iii) coordinate national efforts to ensure public health preparedness for a terrorist attack, including reviewing vaccination policies and reviewing the adequacy of and, if necessary, increasing vaccine and pharmaceutical stockpiles and hospital capacity;

(iv) coordinate Federal assistance to State and local authorities and nongovernmental organizations to prepare for and respond to terrorist threats or attacks within the United States;

(v) ensure that national preparedness programs and activities for terrorist threats or attacks are developed and are regularly evaluated under appropriate standards and that resources are allocated to improving and sustaining preparedness based on such evaluations; and

(vi) ensure the readiness and coordinated deployment of Federal response teams to respond to terrorist threats or attacks, working with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, when appropriate.

(d) Prevention. The Office shall coordinate efforts to prevent terrorist attacks within the United States. In performing this function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i) facilitate the exchange of information among such agencies relating to immigration and visa matters and shipments of cargo; and, working with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, ensure coordination among such agencies to prevent the entry of terrorists and terrorist materials and supplies into the United States and facilitate removal of such terrorists from the United States, when appropriate;

(ii) coordinate efforts to investigate terrorist threats and attacks within the United States; and

(iii) coordinate efforts to improve the security of United States borders, territorial waters, and airspace in order to prevent acts of terrorism within the United States, working with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, when appropriate.

(e) Protection. The Office shall coordinate efforts to protect the United States and its critical infrastructure from the consequences of terrorist attacks. In performing this function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i) strengthen measures for protecting energy production, transmission, and distribution services and critical facilities; other utilities; telecommunications; facilities that produce, use, store, or dispose of nuclear material; and other critical infrastructure services and critical facilities within the United States from terrorist attack;

(ii) coordinate efforts to protect critical public and privately owned information systems within the United States from terrorist attack;

(iii) develop criteria for reviewing whether appropriate security measures are in place at major public and privately owned facilities within the United States;

(iv) coordinate domestic efforts to ensure that special events determined by appropriate senior officials to have national significance are protected from terrorist attack;

(v) coordinate efforts to protect transportation systems within the United States, including railways, highways, shipping, ports and waterways, and airports and civilian aircraft, from terrorist attack;

(vi) coordinate efforts to protect United States livestock, agriculture, and systems for the provision of water and food for human use and consumption from terrorist attack; and

(vii) coordinate efforts to prevent unauthorized access to, development of, and unlawful importation into the United States of, chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear, explosive, or other related materials that have the potential to be used in terrorist attacks.

(f) Response and Recovery. The Office shall coordinate efforts to respond to and promote recovery from terrorist threats or attacks within the United States. In performing this function, the Office shall work with Federal, State, and local agencies, and private entities, as appropriate, to:

(i) coordinate efforts to ensure rapid restoration of transportation systems, energy production, transmission, and distribution systems; telecommunications; other utilities; and other critical infrastructure facilities after disruption by a terrorist threat or attack;

(ii) coordinate efforts to ensure rapid restoration of public and private critical information systems after disruption by a terrorist threat or attack;

(iii) work with the National Economic Council to coordinate efforts to stabilize United States financial markets after a terrorist threat or attack and manage the immediate economic and financial consequences of the incident;

(iv) coordinate Federal plans and programs to provide medical, financial, and other assistance to victims of terrorist attacks and their families; and

(v) coordinate containment and removal of biological, chemical, radiological, explosive, or other hazardous materials in the event of a terrorist threat or attack involving such hazards and coordinate efforts to mitigate the effects of such an attack.

(g) Incident Management. Consistent with applicable law, including the statutory functions of the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall be the official primarily responsible for advising and assisting the President in the coordination of domestic incident management activities of all departments and agencies in the event of a terrorist threat, and during and in the aftermath of terrorist attacks, major disasters, or other emergencies, within the United States. Generally, the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall serve as the principal point of contact for and to the President with respect to the coordination of such activities. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall coordinate with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, as appropriate.

(h) Continuity of Government. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, in coordination with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, shall review plans and preparations for ensuring the continuity of the Federal Government in the event of a terrorist attack that threatens the safety and security of the United States Government or its leadership.

(i) Public Affairs. The Office, subject to the direction of the White House Office of Communications, shall coordinate the strategy of the executive branch for communicating with the public in the event of a terrorist threat or attack within the United States. The Office also shall coordinate the development of programs for educating the public about the nature of terrorist threats and appropriate precautions and responses.

(j) Cooperation with State and Local Governments and Private Entities. The Office shall encourage and invite the participation of State and local governments and private entities, as appropriate, in carrying out the Office’s functions.

(k) Review of Legal Authorities and Development of Legislative Proposals. The Office shall coordinate a periodic review and assessment of the legal authorities available to executive departments and agencies to permit them to perform the functions described in this order. When the Office determines that such legal authorities are inadequate, the Office shall develop, in consultation with executive departments and agencies, proposals for presidential action and legislative proposals for submission to the Office of Management and Budget to enhance the ability of executive departments and agencies to perform those functions. The Office shall work with State and local governments in assessing the adequacy of their legal authorities to permit them to detect, prepare for, prevent, protect against, and recover from terrorist threats and attacks.

(l) Budget Review. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, in consultation with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (the “Director”) and the heads of executive departments and agencies, shall identify programs that contribute to the Administration’s strategy for homeland security and, in the development of the President’s annual budget submission, shall review and provide advice to the heads of departments and agencies for such programs. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall provide advice to the Director on the level and use of funding in departments and agencies for homeland security-related activities and, prior to the Director’s forwarding of the proposed annual budget submission to the President for transmittal to the Congress, shall certify to the Director the funding levels that the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security believes are necessary and appropriate for the homeland security-related activities of the executive branch.

Sec. 4. Administration.

(a) The Office of Homeland Security shall be directed by the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security.

(b) The Office of Administration within the Executive Office of the President shall provide the Office of Homeland Security with such personnel, funding, and administrative support, to the extent permitted by law and subject to the availability of appropriations, as directed by the Chief of Staff to carry out the provisions of this order.

(c) Heads of executive departments and agencies are authorized, to the extent permitted by law, to detail or assign personnel of such departments and agencies to the Office of Homeland Security upon request of the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, subject to the approval of the Chief of Staff.

Sec. 5. Establishment of Homeland Security Council.

(a) I hereby establish a Homeland Security Council (the “Council”), which shall be responsible for advising and assisting the President with respect to all aspects of homeland security. The Council shall serve as the mechanism for ensuring coordination of homeland security-related activities of executive departments and agencies and effective development and implementation of homeland security policies.

(b) The Council shall have as its members the President, the Vice President, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Defense, the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Transportation, the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Director of Central Intelligence, the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, and such other officers of the executive branch as the President may from time to time designate. The Chief of Staff, the Chief of Staff to the Vice President, the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, the Counsel to the President, and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget also are invited to attend any Council meeting. The Secretary of State, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Energy, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, and the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy shall be invited to attend meetings pertaining to their responsibilities. The heads of other executive departments and agencies and other senior officials shall be invited to attend Council meetings when appropriate.

(c) The Council shall meet at the President’s direction. When the President is absent from a meeting of the Council, at the President’s direction the Vice President may preside. The Assistant to the President for Homeland Security shall be responsible, at the President’s direction, for determining the agenda, ensuring that necessary papers are prepared, and recording Council actions and Presidential decisions.

Sec. 6. Original Classification Authority. I hereby delegate the authority to classify information originally as Top Secret, in accordance with Executive Order 12958 [former 50 U.S.C. 3161 note] or any successor Executive Order, to the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security.

Sec. 7. Continuing Authorities. This order does not alter the existing authorities of United States Government departments and agencies, including the Department of Homeland Security. All executive departments and agencies are directed to assist the Council and the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security in carrying out the purposes of this order.

Sec. 8. General Provisions.

(a) This order does not create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or equity by a party against the United States, its departments, agencies or instrumentalities, its officers or employees, or any other person.

(b) References in this order to State and local governments shall be construed to include tribal governments and United States territories and other possessions.

(c) References to the “United States” shall be construed to include United States territories and possessions.

Sec. 9. [Amended Ex. Ord. No. 12656, set out as a note under section 5195 of Title 42, The Public Health and Welfare.]

George W. Bush.
Executive Order No. 13260

Ex. Ord. No. 13260, Mar. 19, 2002, 67 F.R. 13241, as amended by Ex. Ord. No. 13286, § 4, Feb. 28, 2003, 68 F.R. 10619, which established the President’s Homeland Security Advisory Council and Senior Advisory Committees for Homeland Security, was revoked by Ex. Ord. No. 13286, § 4, Feb. 28, 2003, 68 F.R. 10619, eff. Mar. 31, 2003.

Ex. Ord. No. 13657. Changing the Name of the National Security Staff to the National Security Council Staff

Ex. Ord. No. 13657, Feb. 10, 2014, 79 F.R. 8823, provided:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, and in order to reflect my decision to change the name of the National Security Staff to the National Security Council staff, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Name Change. All references to the National Security Staff or Homeland Security Council Staff in any Executive Order or Presidential directive shall be understood to refer to the staff of the National Security Council.

Sec. 2. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Barack Obama.
Ex. Ord. No. 13729. A Comprehensive Approach to Atrocity Prevention and Response

Ex. Ord. No. 13729, May 18, 2016, 81 F.R. 32611, provided:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. As articulated in Presidential Study Directive-10 (PSD–10), preventing mass atrocities and genocide is a core national security interest and a core moral responsibility of the United States. Noting that governmental engagement on mass atrocities and genocide too often arrives too late, when opportunities for prevention or low-cost, low-risk action have been missed, PSD–10 directed the establishment of an interagency Atrocities Prevention Board (Board), with the primary purpose of coordinating a whole-of-government approach to prevent mass atrocities and genocide. PSD–10 also directed an interagency study to develop and recommend the membership, mandate, structure, operational protocols, authorities, and support necessary for the Board to coordinate and develop atrocity prevention and response policy. This order continues in place the Board established in 2012 as I directed in PSD–10, sets out the support to be afforded by executive departments, agencies, and offices, and updates and memorializes the terms on which the Board will continue to operate in the service of its important mission.

Sec. 2. Definition. For purposes of this order, the term “mass atrocities” or “atrocities,” neither of which is defined under international law, refers to large scale and deliberate attacks on civilians, and includes acts falling within the definition “genocide” as defined in international law and under U.S. domestic statute.

Sec. 3. Responsibilities. The Board shall seek to ensure that mass atrocities and the risk thereof are effectively considered and appropriately addressed by the U.S. Government, and shall coordinate the development and execution of policies and tools to enhance our capacity to prevent and respond to mass atrocities.

(a) In order to ensure that emerging mass atrocity risks and mass atrocity situations are considered and addressed, the Board shall monitor developments around the world that heighten the risk of mass atrocities, and analyze and closely review specific mass atrocity threats or situations of heightened concern.

(b) The Board shall also identify any gaps related to the prevention of and response to mass atrocities in the current policies and ongoing interagency processes concerning particular regions or countries and shall make recommendations to strengthen policies, programs, resources, and tools related to mass atrocity prevention and response to relevant executive departments and agencies (agencies), including through the Board’s function as an interagency policy committee, as detailed in section 4 of this order. In these efforts, the Board shall focus in particular on ways for the U.S. Government to develop, strengthen, and enhance its capabilities to:

(i) monitor, receive early warning of, and coordinate responses to potential mass atrocities;

(ii) deter and isolate perpetrators of mass atrocities through all available and appropriate authorities;

(iii) promote accountability of and deny impunity for perpetrators of mass atrocities, including by denying safe haven for perpetrators found in the United States;

(iv) engage allies and partners, including the United Nations and other multilateral and regional institutions, to build capacity and mobilize action for preventing and responding to mass atrocities;

(v) deploy civilian personnel with expertise in conflict prevention, civilian protection, mediation, and other relevant skills, including on a rapid response basis, to assist in mass atrocity prevention and response efforts;

(vi) increase capacity for our diplomats, armed services, development professionals, and other actors to engage in mass atrocity prevention and response activities;

(vii) develop and implement tailored foreign assistance programs as well as doctrine for our armed services to address and mitigate the risks of mass atrocities;

(viii) ensure intelligence collection, analysis, and sharing of information, as appropriate, relating to mass atrocity threats and situations; and

(ix) address any other issue regarding mass atrocity prevention and response that the Board determines is appropriate.

Sec. 4. Structure and Protocols of the Atrocities Prevention Board. The Board shall continue to operate and will have the following structure and protocols:

(a) The Board shall function as an interagency policy committee, or body of equivalent standing, chaired by a member of the National Security Council staff at the Senior Director level or higher who shall be designated by the President (Chair).

(b) The Chair shall convene the Board on a monthly basis to perform the responsibilities set forth in section 3 of this order. The Board shall also meet as needed on an ad hoc and time-sensitive basis to consider and address emerging mass atrocity threats or situations.

(c) The Deputies Committee of the National Security Council (Deputies) shall meet at least twice per year, and the Principals Committee of the National Security Council (Principals) shall meet at least once per year, to review and direct the work of the Board.

(d) The Board shall be composed of individuals at the Assistant Secretary-level or higher who shall be designated by the leadership of their respective departments or agencies. Within 60 days of a vacancy on the Board, the relevant department or agency or office head shall designate a replacement representative and notify the National Security Advisor. In addition to the Chair, the Board shall consist of the designated representatives from the following:

(i) the Office of the Vice President;

(ii) the Department of State;

(iii) the Department of the Treasury;

(iv) the Department of Defense;

(v) the Department of Justice;

(vi) the Department of Homeland Security;

(vii) the U.S. Mission to the United Nations;

(viii) the Office of the Director of National Intelligence;

(ix) the Central Intelligence Agency;

(x) the U.S. Agency for International Development;

(xi) the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and

(xii) such other agencies or offices as may request to participate in coordination with the Chair.

(e) The Chair shall report, through the National Security Advisor, to the President by April 30 each year on the work of the U.S. Government in mass atrocity prevention and response, including the work of the Board.

(f) The Chair shall prepare written updates for the public, on an annual basis, on the work of the U.S. Government in mass atrocity prevention and response, including the work of the Board.

(g) Consistent with the objectives set out in this order and in accordance with applicable law, the Board shall conduct outreach, including regular consultations, with representatives of nongovernmental organizations with expertise in mass atrocity prevention and response and other appropriate parties. Such outreach shall be for the purpose of assisting the Board with its work on considering and addressing emerging mass atrocity threats or situations and on developing new or improved policies and tools, as well as for the purpose of providing transparency on the work of the Board.

(h) In order to conduct the work set forth in this order effectively, the Board may:

(i) request information or analysis from the Intelligence Community (IC), Chiefs of Mission, agencies, and offices;

(ii) develop policy recommendations and programmatic recommendations for agencies, offices, and existing interagency processes;

(iii) in conjunction with existing interagency processes, formulate policy recommendations and programmatic recommendations;

(iv) coordinate with the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to develop guidance on mass atrocity prevention resource priorities for agencies and offices; and

(v) bring urgent or significant matters to the attention of the Deputies and, as appropriate, request that the Deputies convene to address a situation of concern, consistent with Presidential Policy Directive-1 or its successor.

Sec. 5. Enhancing Capabilities and Tools. Agencies shall take the following actions in support of the United States Government’s policy of working to prevent and respond to mass atrocities:

(a) Agencies, in coordination with the Board, shall ensure that mass atrocity prevention and response staffing, training, funding, and activities are addressed in their strategic planning and budget processes, including Department Quadrennial Reviews, Mission Resource Requests, State Department Integrated Country Strategies, U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Joint Strategic Plans, State Department Bureau Strategic Resource Plans, and related strategic planning and budget processes and documents. The Chair shall make recommendations to the National Security Advisor on the inclusion of material in the President’s National Security Strategy that addresses mass atrocity prevention and response.

(b) The Department of State and USAID shall work with OMB to support the maintenance of civilian assistance accounts and authorities that enable swift civilian responses to mass atrocity threats and situations.

(c) The Department of State and USAID shall offer mass atrocity prevention and response training courses to all officers deployed or planning deployment to countries deemed by the IC to be at high or substantial risk for mass atrocities.

(d) The Department of State and USAID shall continue to build and use civilian capacity (i.e., the ability to deploy personnel with expertise in conflict prevention, civilian protection, mediation, and other relevant skills) effectively for mass atrocity prevention and response, and shall develop mechanisms for enhanced partnerships with non-U.S. Government actors that could provide surge capacity, such as the United Nations and other multilateral and regional organizations, foreign governments, and nongovernmental organizations.

(e) The IC shall continue to monitor developments worldwide and, as changing conditions warrant, prepare an IC-coordinated assessment updating IC judgments in its National Intelligence Estimate on the global risk of mass atrocities and genocide at regular intervals to inform the work of the Board.

(f) Recognizing mass atrocity prevention as a core national security interest of the United States, the IC shall allocate resources so as to permit a collection surge for countries where the Board determines, and the Deputies concur, that there are ongoing or acute risks of mass atrocities that merit increased attention, in accordance with the National Intelligence Priority Framework and available resources.

(g) The IC shall work with partner governments to encourage the collection and analysis of mass atrocity-related intelligence and the sharing of this intelligence with the U.S. Government and its partners in mass atrocity prevention and response.

(h) The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of Justice, in coordination with the Department of State, shall continue to develop proposals for legislative, regulatory, or administrative amendments or changes that would permit the more effective use and enforcement of immigration and other laws to deny impunity to perpetrators of mass atrocities and that would enhance our ability to prosecute such perpetrators subject to the jurisdiction of the United States and remove those who are not citizens.

(i) The Department of Defense (DOD) shall continue to develop joint doctrine and training that support mass atrocity prevention and response operations and shall address mass atrocity prevention and response as part of its general planning guidance to combatant commands and services.

(j) The Department of State, the Department of the Treasury, DHS, the U.S. Mission to the United Nations (USUN), and other agencies as appropriate, shall coordinate with bilateral and multilateral partners on the deployment of mass atrocity prevention and response tools, including isolating and deterring perpetrators of mass atrocities through all available authorities (including administrative actions, visa authorities, and capacity-building support), as appropriate.

(k) The Department of State, in coordination with USUN, DOD, and other agencies as appropriate, shall work bilaterally, multilaterally, and with regionally based organizations to enhance effectiveness in the fields of early warning, analysis, prevention, response, and accountability, and shall work with international partners to build or encourage building the capacity of our allies and partners to prevent and respond to mass atrocities.

Sec. 6. General Provisions. (a) Members of the Board shall serve without any additional compensation for their work on the Board.

(b) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof, or the status of that department or agency within the Federal Government; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of OMB relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(c) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law, and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(d) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Barack Obama.
Ex. Ord. No. 13747. Advancing the Global Health Security Agenda To Achieve a World Safe and Secure From Infectious Disease Threats

Ex. Ord. No. 13747, Nov. 4, 2016, 81 F.R. 78701, provided:

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, it is hereby ordered as follows:

Section 1. Policy. As articulated in the National Strategy for Countering Biological Threats and implemented in Presidential Policy Directive 2 (PPD–2), promoting global health security is a core tenet of our national strategy for countering biological threats. No single nation can be prepared if other nations remain unprepared to counter biological threats; therefore, it is the policy of the United States to advance the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), which is a multi-faceted, multi-country initiative intended to accelerate partner countries’ measurable capabilities to achieve specific targets to prevent, detect, and respond to infectious disease threats (GHSA targets), whether naturally occurring, deliberate, or accidental. The roles, responsibilities, and activities described in this order will support the goals of the International Health Regulations (IHR) and will be conducted, as appropriate, in coordination with the World Health Organization (WHO), Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, the International Criminal Police Organization (INTERPOL), and other relevant organizations and stakeholders. To advance the achievement of the GHSA targets and to support the implementation of the IHR within partner countries, each executive department, agency, and office (agency) shall, as appropriate, partner, consult, and coordinate with other governments, international financial institutions, international organizations, regional organizations, economic communities, and nongovernmental stakeholders, including the private sector.

Sec. 2. GHSA Interagency Review Council.

(a) GHSA Coordination and Policy Development. In furtherance of the policy described in section 1 of this order, I hereby direct the National Security Council staff, in accordance with the procedures and requirements in Presidential Policy Directive 1 (or any successor directive), to convene a GHSA Interagency Review Council (Council) to perform the responsibilities described in this order. The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, in coordination with the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism, shall designate a member of the National Security Council staff to serve as Chair for the Council. The Council shall meet not less than four times per year to advance its mission and fulfill its responsibilities.

(b) GHSA Interagency Review Council Responsibilities.

(i) The Council shall be responsible for the following activities:

(A) Provide, by consensus, policy-level guidance to participating agencies on GHSA goals, objectives, and implementation.

(B) Facilitate interagency, multi-sectoral engagement to carry out GHSA implementation.

(C) Provide a forum for raising and working to resolve interagency disagreements concerning the GHSA.

(D) Review the progress toward and work to resolve challenges in achieving U.S. commitments under the GHSA, including commitments to assist other countries in achieving the GHSA targets. The Council shall consider, among other issues, the status of U.S. financial commitments to the GHSA in the context of commitments by other donors, and the contributions of partner countries to achieve the GHSA targets; progress toward the milestones outlined in GHSA national plans for those countries where the United States Government has committed to assist in implementing the GHSA and in annual work-plans outlining agency priorities for implementing the GHSA; and external evaluations of United States and partner country capabilities to address infectious disease threats, including the ability to achieve the targets outlined within the WHO Joint External Evaluation (JEE) tool, as well as gaps identified by such external evaluations.

(E) Provide, by consensus, within 30 days of the date of this order, initial policy-level guidance on GHSA implementation.

(F) Develop a report on an annual basis regarding the progress achieved and challenges concerning the United States Government’s ability to advance the GHSA across priority countries. The report shall include recommendations to resolve, mitigate, or otherwise address the challenges identified therein. The report shall be transmitted to the President and, to the extent possible, made publicly available.

(G) Conduct an overall review of the GHSA for submission to the President by September 2019. The review should include an evaluation of the progress achieved during the 5 years of this initiative, as well as any challenges faced. The report should also provide recommendations on the future direction of the initiative.

(ii) The Council shall not perform any activities or functions that interfere with the foreign affairs responsibilities of the Secretary of State, including the responsibility to oversee the implementation of programs and policies that advance the GHSA within foreign countries.

(c) Participation. The Council shall consist of representatives, serving at the Assistant Secretary level or higher, from the following agencies:

(i) the Department of State;

(ii) the Department of Defense;

(iii) the Department of Justice;

(iv) the Department of Agriculture;

(v) the Department of Health and Human Services;

(vi) the Department of Homeland Security;

(vii) the Office of Management and Budget;

(viii) the United States Agency for International Development;

(ix) the Environmental Protection Agency;

(x) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;

(xi) the Federal Bureau of Investigation;

(xii) the Office of Science and Technology Policy; and

(xiii) such other agencies as the agencies set forth above, by consensus, deem appropriate.

Sec. 3. Agency Roles and Responsibilities. In furtherance of the policy described in section 1 of this order, I hereby direct agencies to perform the following:

(a) The heads of agencies described in section 2(c) of this order shall:

(i) make the GHSA and its implementation a high priority within their respective agencies, and include GHSA-related activities within their respective agencies’ strategic planning and budget processes;

(ii) designate a senior-level official to be responsible for the implementation of this order;

(iii) designate, in accordance with section 2(c) of this order, an appropriate representative at the Assistant Secretary level or higher to participate on the Council;

(iv) keep the Council apprised of GHSA-related activities undertaken within their respective agencies;

(v) maintain responsibility for agency-related programmatic functions in coordination with host governments, country teams, and GHSA in-country teams, and in conjunction with other relevant agencies;

(vi) coordinate with other agencies that are identified in this order to satisfy programmatic goals, and further facilitate coordination of country teams, implementers, and donors in host countries; and

(vii) coordinate across GHSA national plans and with GHSA partners to which the United States is providing assistance.

(b) The Secretary of State shall:

(i) engage Chiefs of Mission, country teams, and regional and functional bureaus within the Department of State to promote the GHSA with international partners and to facilitate country-level implementation of U.S. programmatic activities;

(ii) monitor and evaluate progress toward achieving GHSA targets, determine where more work is needed, and work with agencies and international partners to identify the partners best placed to improve performance and to achieve the GHSA targets for countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(iii) facilitate implementation and coordination of Department of State programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(iv) coordinate planning, implementation, and evaluation of GHSA activities with the U.S. Global Malaria Coordinator at the United States Agency for International Development and the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator at the Department of State in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(v) lead diplomatic outreach, including at senior levels, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, to build international support for the GHSA with its members, other countries, and regional and multilateral bodies, including the Group of 7 (G7), the Group of 20 (G20), the African Union, the WHO, the OIE, the FAO, INTERPOL, the Global Partnership Against the Spread of Weapons and Materials of Mass Destruction, the European Union, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the Economic Community of West African States, the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, development banks, and other relevant partners;

(vi) work, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, with other donors and nongovernmental implementers in partner countries in order to leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners; and

(vii) coordinate, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, the United States Government relationship with foreign and domestic GHSA nongovernmental stakeholders, including the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, and foundations, and develop, with consensus from the Council, an annual GHSA nongovernmental outreach strategy.

(c) The Secretary of Defense shall:

(i) facilitate implementation and coordination of Department of Defense programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(ii) work, in conjunction with interagency partners and the in-country GHSA team, with other donors and nongovernmental implementers in partner countries in which Department of Defense programs are active in order to coordinate and leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners; and

(iii) coordinate and communicate, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, with defense ministries with regard to the GHSA, including at the GHSA Ministerial and Steering Group.

(d) The Attorney General, generally acting through the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), shall:

(i) serve, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, as the United States Government lead for GHSA targets relating to linking public health and law enforcement, and coordinate with INTERPOL on the GHSA and its successful implementation;

(ii) facilitate implementation and coordination of FBI programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist; and

(iii) work, in conjunction with interagency partners and the in-country GHSA team, with other donors and nongovernmental implementers in partner countries in which FBI programs are active in order to coordinate and leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners.

(e) The Secretary of Agriculture shall:

(i) represent, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, the United States in coordination and communication with the FAO and OIE with regard to the GHSA;

(ii) facilitate implementation and coordination of Department of Agriculture programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist; and

(iii) work, in conjunction with interagency partners and the in-country GHSA team, with other donors, contributing international organizations, and nongovernmental implementers in partner countries in which Department of Agriculture programs are active in order to coordinate and leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners.

(f) The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall:

(i) represent, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, the United States at GHSA Ministerial and Steering Group meetings and in working with G7 and G20 Health Ministers on the GHSA, and coordinate United States Government support for those activities;

(ii) provide overall leadership and coordination for the GHSA Action Packages (Action Packages), which consist of country commitments to advance and share best practices toward specific GHSA targets, including serving as the primary point of contact for the Action Packages, providing support to Action Package leaders, and tracking overall progress on the Action Packages;

(iii) coordinate United States Government support for and participation in external evaluations, including the WHO JEE tool and the Alliance for Country Assessments for Global Health Security and IHR Implementation;

(iv) represent, in conjunction with other relevant agencies, the United States in coordination and communication with the WHO regarding the GHSA;

(v) facilitate, no less than every 4 years, the request for an external assessment, such as the process outlined within the WHO JEE tool, of United States Government domestic efforts to implement the IHR and the GHSA and work to publish the assessment to the general public; and

(vi) consolidate and publish to the general public an external assessment of United States domestic capability to address infectious disease threats and implement the IHR, including the ability to achieve the targets outlined within the WHO JEE tool and including the gaps identified by such external assessment.

(g) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall:

(i) assess the impacts of global health threats on homeland security operations; and

(ii) lead, in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of State, and the Secretary of Agriculture, United States Government GHSA activities related to global health threats at U.S. borders and ports of entry.

(h) The Administrator for the United States Agency for International Development shall:

(i) facilitate implementation and coordination of United States Agency for International Development programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(ii) provide, in conjunction with other agencies, strategic technical guidance for achieving GHSA targets; and

(iii) work, in conjunction with interagency partners and the in-country GHSA teams, with other donors and nongovernmental GHSA implementers in partner countries in which United States Agency for International Development programs are active in order to coordinate and leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners.

(i) The Director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in coordination with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, shall:

(i) facilitate implementation and coordination of U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention programs to further the GHSA, as well as provide technical expertise to measure and evaluate progress in countries the United States has made a commitment to assist;

(ii) provide, in conjunction with other agencies, strategic technical guidance for achieving GHSA targets;

(iii) provide, in coordination with the Department of Health and Human Services, strategic technical support for and participate in external assessments, including the WHO JEE tool, and the Alliance for Country Assessments for Global Health Security and IHR implementation; and

(iv) work, in conjunction with interagency partners and the in-country GHSA team, with other donors and nongovernmental implementers in partner countries in which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention programs are active in order to coordinate and leverage commitments to advance the GHSA with partners.

Sec. 4. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair, or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department, agency, or the head thereof;

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office of Management and Budget relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals; or

(iii) the coordination or implementation of emergency response operations during a health emergency.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law, and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

Barack Obama.
Steps for Increased Legal and Policy Transparency Concerning the United States Use of Military Force and Related National Security Operations

Memorandum of President of the United States, Dec. 5, 2016, 81 F.R. 94213, provided:

Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies

Since my earliest days in office, I have emphasized the importance of transparency and my commitment to making as much information as possible available to the Congress and the public about the United States use of military force and related national security operations. Doing so, I believe, not only supports the process of democratic decision making, but also demonstrates the legitimacy and strengthens the sustainability of our operations while promoting mutual understanding with our allies and partners.

The United States has used military force and conducted related national security operations within legal and policy frameworks that are designed to ensure that such operations are lawful and effective and that they serve our interests and values. Consistent with my commitment to transparency, my Administration has provided to the public an unprecedented amount of information regarding these frameworks through speeches, public statements, reports, and other materials. We have attempted to explain, consistent with our national security and the proper functioning of the executive branch, when and why the United States conducts such operations, the legal basis and policy parameters for such operations, and how such operations have unfolded, so that the American people can better understand them.

In addition to the efforts we have made to date, there is still more work that can be done to inform the public. Thus, consistent with my Administration’s previous efforts, by this memorandum I am directing national security departments and agencies to take additional steps to share with the public further information relating to the legal and policy frameworks within which the United States uses military force and conducts related national security operations. Accordingly, I hereby direct as follows:

Section 1. Report. National security departments and agencies shall prepare for the President a formal report that describes key legal and policy frameworks that currently guide the United States use of military force and related national security operations, with a view toward the report being released to the public.

Sec. 2. Keeping the Public Informed. On no less than an annual basis, the National Security Council staff shall be asked to, as appropriate, coordinate a review and update of the report described in section 1 of this memorandum, provide any updated report to the President, and arrange for the report to be released to the public.

Sec. 3. Definitions. For the purposes of this memorandum:

“National security departments and agencies” include the Departments of State, the Treasury, Defense, Justice, and Homeland Security, the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the Central Intelligence Agency, and such other agencies as the President may designate.

“Related national security operations” include operations deemed relevant and appropriate by national security departments and agencies for inclusion in the report described in section 1 of this memorandum, such as detention, transfer, and interrogation operations.

Sec. 4. Publication. The Secretary of State is hereby authorized and directed to publish this memorandum in the Federal Register.

Barack Obama.

 

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