RULE 641-70.6 - Work practice standards for lead professionals conducting lead-based paint activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities

RULE 641-70.6. Work practice standards for lead professionals conducting lead-based paint activities in target housing and child-occupied facilities

All lead-based paint activities shall be performed according to the work practice standards in 641-70.6 (135), and a certified individual must perform that activity in compliance with the appropriate requirements below.

(1) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a lead-free inspection according to the following standards. A lead-free inspection shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. When conducting a lead-free inspection in a residential dwelling, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following procedures:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test paint in each room, including each exterior side.

(2) Except for components known to have been replaced after December 31, 1977, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test each testing combination in each room. On windows, the window frame, interior windowsill, window sash, and window trough shall each be considered a separate testing combination. Except for walls, one sample shall be taken for each testing combination in a room. Each wall in a room shall be tested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall require one of the following two types of evidence to determine that components were replaced after 1977:

1. Detailed specifications showing which components were to be replaced, restored, enclosed, or encapsulated and evidence that the work was actually completed such as receipts for building materials, city building records showing a date of remodeling, or a final inspection by the city or another inspector showing that the work was actually completed.

2. A certification under penalty of perjury per Iowa Code section 622.1 from the contractor who did the work or from the person(s) who owned the property at the time outlining all of the components that were removed and replaced.

If one of these two types of evidence is not available, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test the component.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall note any components where lead-based paint has been enclosed or encapsulated. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not make a determination that the residential dwelling is lead-free where components that are painted with lead-based paint have been enclosed or encapsulated.

(4) Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

1. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

2. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use standards provided by the manufacturer and the NIST 1.02 standard film for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer.

3. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection, every four hours, and at the end of the inspection.

4. Prior to taking the final set of calibration readings and if recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16.

5. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint.

6. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If instructed by the property owner or the person requesting the report, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that inconclusive readings are positive, but shall not assume that inconclusive readings are negative.

7. As described by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct retesting of 10 surfaces, calculate the retest tolerance limit, and determine whether the inspection meets the retest tolerance limit. If the retest tolerance limit is not met, then this procedure shall be repeated with 10 additional surfaces. If the retest tolerance limit is not met with the 20 retested surfaces, then all results of the inspection shall be considered invalid.

(5) If each testing combination in the residential dwelling is found to be free of lead-based paint, then the residential dwelling is free of lead-based paint. If any surface in the residential dwelling is found to be painted with lead-based paint, then the residential dwelling is not free of lead-based paint.

(6) If lead-based paint is identified through a lead-free inspection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a visual inspection to determine the presence of lead-based paint hazards and any other potential lead hazards including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated.

(7) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where a lead-free inspection is completed. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the lead-free inspection, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of each written report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

1. A statement that the inspection was conducted to determine whether the residential dwelling is free of lead-based paint;

2. Date of inspection;

3. Address of building;

4. Date of construction;

5. Apartment numbers (if applicable);

6. The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

7. Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the inspection;

8. Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the inspection;

9. Name, address, and telephone number of each laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples;

10. Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device;

11. XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated at each required calibration;

12. Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

13. The results of retesting of 10 surfaces, calculations to determine the retest tolerance limit, and the determination of whether the inspection meets the retest tolerance limit;

14. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor determines that the residential dwelling is free of lead-based paint, the report shall contain the following statement:

"The results of this inspection indicate that no lead in amounts greater than or equal to 1.0 mg/cm2in paint was found on any building components, using the inspection protocol in Chapter 7 of the Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing ((2012), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development). Therefore, this residential dwelling qualifies for the exemption in 24 CFR Part 35 and 40 CFR Part 745 for target housing being leased that is free of lead-based paint, as defined in the rule. However, some painted surfaces may contain levels of lead below 1.0 mg/cm2, which could create lead dust or lead-contaminated soil hazards if the paint is turned into dust by abrasion, scraping, or sanding. This report should be kept by the owner and all future owners for the life of the residential dwelling. Per the disclosure requirements of 24 CFR Part 35 and 40 CFR Part 745, prospective buyers are entitled to all available inspection reports should the property be resold.";

15. If any lead-based paint is identified, a description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, including the classification of each tested surface as to whether it is a lead-based paint hazard, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

16. A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

17. Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

18. Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation, remodeling and repainting found in 641-Chapter 70; and

19. The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

b. When conducting a lead-free inspection in multifamily housing, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following procedures:

(1) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may randomly select residential dwellings for testing when conducting a lead-free inspection in multifamily housing. If built before 1960 or if the date of construction is unknown, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. If built from 1960 to 1977, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 10 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not randomly select the residential dwellings for testing or if there are not enough residential dwellings to randomly select them for sampling, all residential dwellings shall be tested. If random selection is used, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the lead-free inspection shall randomly select the residential dwellings to be tested. The property owner, manager, or another interested party shall not specify which residential dwellings are to be tested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the number of residential dwellings to randomly select for testing.

Number of Similar Residential Dwellings, Similar Common Areas, or Similar Exteriors in Multifamily Housing

Lead-Free Inspection, Risk Assessment, or Lead Hazard Screen

Clearance Testing

Number of Pre-1960 Residential Dwellings or Residential Dwellings of Unknown Date of Construction to Randomly Select for Testing

Number of 1960-1977 Residential Dwellings to Randomly Select for Testing

Number of Residential Dwellings to Randomly Select for Clearance Testing

1-9

All

All

All

10-13

All

10

All

14

All

11

All

15

All

12

All

16-17

All

13

All

18

All

14

All

19

All

15

All

20

All

16

All

21-26

20

16

20

27

21

17

21

28

22

18

22

29

23

18

23

30

23

19

23

31

24

19

24

32

25

19

25

33-34

26

19

26

35

27

19

27

36

28

19

28

37

29

19

29

38-39

30

20

30

40-48

31

21

31

49-50

31

22

31

51

32

22

32

52-53

33

22

33

54

34

22

34

55-56

35

22

35

57-58

36

22

36

59

37

23

37

60-69

38

23

38

70-73

38

24

38

74-75

39

24

39

76-77

40

24

40

78-79

41

24

41

80-88

42

24

42

89-95

42

25

42

96-97

43

25

43

98-99

44

25

44

100-109

45

25

45

110-117

45

26

45

118-119

46

26

46

120-138

47

26

47

139-157

48

26

48

158-159

49

26

49

160-177

49

27

49

178-197

50

27

50

198-218

51

27

51

219-258

52

27

52

259-279

53

27

53

280-299

53

28

53

300-379

54

28

54

380-499

55

28

55

500-776

56

28

56

777-939

57

28

57

940-1004

57

29

57

1005-1022

58

29

58

1023-1032

59

29

59

1033-1039

59

30

59

1040+

5.8%, rounded to the next highest whole number

2.9%, rounded to the next highest whole number

5.8%, rounded to the next highest whole number

(2) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may randomly select each type of common area in the multifamily housing, including but not limited to hallways, exterior sides of a building, and laundry rooms, for testing. Each type of common area shall be counted separately. If built before 1960, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 20 of a type of common area in order to use random selection. If built from 1960 to 1977, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 10 of a type of common area in order to use random selection. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not randomly select the common areas for testing or if there are not enough common areas to randomly select them for testing, all common areas shall be tested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the number of each type of common area to randomly select for testing.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test paint in each room of each residential dwelling selected for testing and in each common area selected for testing.

(4) Except for components known to have been replaced after December 31, 1977, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test each testing combination in each room of a residential dwelling chosen for testing and in each common area chosen for testing. On windows, the window frame, interior windowsill, window sash, and window trough shall each be considered a separate testing combination. Each wall in a room or a common area shall be tested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall require one of the following two types of evidence to determine that components were replaced after 1977:

1. Detailed specifications showing which components were to be replaced, restored, enclosed, or encapsulated and evidence that the work was actually completed such as receipts for building materials, city building records showing a date of remodeling, or evidence of a final inspection by the city or another inspector showing that the work was actually completed.

2. A certification under penalty of perjury per Iowa Code section 622.1 from the contractor who did the work or from the person(s) who owned the property at the time outlining all of the components that were removed and replaced.

If one of these two types of evidence is not available, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test the component.

(5) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall note any components where lead-based paint has been enclosed or encapsulated. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not make a determination that a component or the multifamily housing is lead-free where components that are painted with lead-based paint have been enclosed or encapsulated.

(6) Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

1. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer which has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

2. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer using a software version or a mode of operation that could result in inconclusive readings or that recommends substrate correction.

3. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use standards provided by the manufacturer and the NIST 1.02 standard film for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer.

4. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection, every four hours, and at the end of the inspection.

5. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading as positive or negative according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint.

6. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall count the number of XRF readings taken for each component type. If fewer than 40 of any component type were tested, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall randomly choose additional testing combinations for the component type to reach a total of 40 XRF readings. If fewer than 40 testing combinations are available for testing, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test each testing combination.

(7) For each component type where at least 40 testing combinations have been tested, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall determine the number and percentage of each component type that is classified as positive or negative. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each component type as follows:

1. Lead-based paint is not present on a component type if all readings are classified as negative.

2. Lead-based paint is present on a component type if at least 15 percent of the readings are classified as positive.

3. Lead-based paint is present on a component type if greater than or equal to 5 percent but less than 15 percent of the XRF readings are classified as positive, unless the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor collects paint samples and obtains laboratory analyses for all positive XRF readings. If the laboratory analyses show that lead-based paint is not present on any components, then the component type is negative. If the laboratory analyses show that lead-based paint is present on any component, then the component type is positive.

4. Lead-based paint is present on a component type if greater than 0 but less than 5 percent of the XRF readings are classified as positive, unless the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor collects paint samples and obtains laboratory analyses for all positive XRF readings or randomly selects a second set of residential dwellings for testing. If the laboratory analyses show that lead-based paint is not present on any components, then the component type is negative. If the laboratory analyses show that lead-based paint is present on any component, then the component type is positive. If a second set of randomly selected residential dwellings is sampled and greater than 0 but less than 2.5 percent of the combined set of results is positive, the component type may be considered as not having lead-based paint development wide but rather, having lead-based paint in isolated locations, with a reasonable degree of confidence. Individual components that are classified as positive should be considered lead-based painted and managed or abated appropriately.

5. If a particular component type in the sampled residential dwellings is classified as positive, that same component type in the unsampled residential dwellings is also classified as positive.

(8) If fewer than 40 of a component type are available for testing, each testing combination must be classified individually as positive or negative.

(9) If any component type or individual component is classified as positive, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that the multifamily housing is free of lead-based paint.

(10) As specified by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct retesting of 10 surfaces selected from two residential dwellings, calculate the retest tolerance limit, and determine whether the inspection meets the retest tolerance limit. If the retest tolerance limit is not met, then this procedure shall be repeated with 10 additional surfaces selected from the two residential dwellings. If the retest tolerance limit is not met with the 20 retested surfaces, then all results of the inspection shall be considered invalid.

(11) If lead-based paint is identified on any component or component type, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a visual inspection to determine the presence of lead-based paint hazards and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated.

(12) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility inspected. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the inspection, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of each written report for no less than three years. The inspection report shall include, at least:

1. Date of each inspection;

2. Address of each building in the multifamily housing;

3. Date of construction for each building in the multifamily housing;

4. A list of the apartments and common areas in each building in the multifamily housing;

5. The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

6. A statement that the inspection was conducted to determine that lead-based paint is not present;

7. The name of the Iowa-certified inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor who randomly selected the residential dwellings and common areas for testing;

8. The number of residential dwellings and common areas that were selected for testing, how these numbers were determined, and a list of the residential dwellings and common areas that were selected for testing;

9. Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the inspection;

10. Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the inspection;

11. Name, address, and telephone number of each laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples;

12. Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer;

13. XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated at each required calibration;

14. Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and by residential dwelling or common area and the results for each component expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

15. Component aggregations and the determination of whether lead-based paint is present by component type;

16. The results of retesting of 10 surfaces, calculations to determine the retest tolerance limit, and the determination of whether the inspection meets the retest tolerance limit;

17. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor determines that the multifamily housing is free of lead-based paint, the report shall contain the following statement:

"The results of this inspection indicate that no lead in amounts greater than or equal to 1.0 mg/cm2 in paint was found on any building components, using the inspection protocol in Chapter 7 of the Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing ((2012), U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development). Therefore, this multifamily housing qualifies for the exemption in 24 CFR Part 35 and 40 CFR Part 745 for target housing being leased that is free of lead-based paint, as defined in the rule. However, some painted surfaces may contain levels of lead below 1.0 mg/cm2, which could create lead dust or lead-contaminated soil hazards if the paint is turned into dust by abrasion, scraping, or sanding. This report should be kept by the owner and all future owners for the life of the multifamily housing. Per the disclosure requirements of 24 CFR Part 35 and 40 CFR Part 745, prospective buyers are entitled to all available inspection reports should the property be resold.";

18. If any lead-based paint is identified, a description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, including the classification of each tested surface as to whether it is a lead-based paint hazard, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

19. A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

20. Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

21. Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69 and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

22. The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(2) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct lead inspections according to the following standards. Lead inspections shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. When conducting a lead inspection in a residential dwelling or child-occupied facility, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following procedures:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test paint in each room, including each exterior side.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test each testing combination in each room. On windows, the window frame, interior windowsill, window sash, and window trough shall each be considered a separate testing combination. One sample shall be taken for each testing combination in a room, including the walls. If a testing combination is painted and not tested, it shall be assumed to be painted with lead-based paint.

b. Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the NIST 1.02 standard film or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that any surface is free of lead-based paint unless the NIST 1.02 standard film is used for calibration.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection.

(4) If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all of the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

(5) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

(6) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings by laboratory analysis, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

c. If lead-based paint is identified through an inspection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a visual inspection to determine the presence of lead-based paint hazards and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated.

d. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility inspected. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the inspection, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of each written report for no less than three years. The inspection report shall include, at least:

(1) A statement that the inspection was conducted to identify lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards in the residential dwelling;

(2) Date of each inspection;

(3) Address of building;

(4) Date of construction;

(5) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(6) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(7) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the inspection;

(8) The name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the inspection;

(9) Name, address, and telephone number of each laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples;

(10) Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer;

(11) XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated;

(12) Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

(13) A statement that all painted or finished components that were not tested must be assumed to contain lead-based paint;

(14) A description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, including the classification of each tested surface as to whether it is a lead-based paint hazard, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

(15) A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

(16) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(17) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(18) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(3) A certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct elevated blood lead (EBL) inspections according to the following standards. Elevated blood lead (EBL) inspections shall be conducted only by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. This protocol may be used for children who do not meet the definition of an EBL child as defined in this chapter as long as the inspection is authorized by the department, a local board of health, or a public housing agency.

a. When conducting an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following procedures:

(1) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test paint in each room, including each exterior side.

(2) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test each testing combination in each room. One sample shall be taken for each testing combination in a room, including walls. On windows, the window frame, interior windowsill, window sash, and window trough shall each be considered a separate testing combination. If a testing combination is painted and not tested, it shall be assumed to be painted with lead-based paint.

b. Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

(1) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

(2) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the NIST 1.02 standard film or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that any surface is free of lead-based paint unless the NIST 1.02 standard film is used for calibration.

(3) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection.

(4) If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all of the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

(5) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

(6) The certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings, then the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

c. If lead-based paint is identified through an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, the certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a visual inspection to determine the presence of lead-based paint hazards and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the play area or in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated.

d. No later than two weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection has been conducted and shall provide a copy of this report to the property owner and the occupant of the dwelling. The report shall include, at least:

(1) A statement that the elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection was conducted to identify lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards in the residential dwelling;

(2) Date of each elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection;

(3) Address of building;

(4) Date of construction;

(5) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(6) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(7) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the inspection;

(8) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the inspection;

(9) Name, address, and telephone number of each laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples;

(10) Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer;

(11) XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated;

(12) Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

(13) A statement that all painted or finished components that were not tested must be assumed to contain lead-based paint;

(14) A description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, including the classification of each tested surface as to whether it is a lead-based paint hazard, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the play area or in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

(15) A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

(16) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(17) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(18) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

e. A certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain for no fewer than ten years a written record for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection has been conducted. The record shall include, at least:

(1) A copy of the written report required by paragraph 70.6(3)"d."

(2) Blood lead test results for the elevated blood lead (EBL) child.

(3) A record of conversations held with the owners and occupants of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility prior to, during, and after the EBL inspection.

(4) Records of follow-up visits made to each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where lead-based paint hazards are identified and, when issued, a copy of the clearance report.

(4) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct lead hazard screens according to the following standards. Lead hazard screens shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. Background information regarding the physical characteristics of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility and occupant use patterns that may cause lead-based paint exposure to at least one child under the age of six years shall be collected.

b. A visual inspection of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility shall be conducted to determine if any deteriorated paint is present and to locate at least two dust sampling locations.

c. If deteriorated paint is present, each surface with deteriorated paint which is determined to have a distinct painting history must be tested for the presence of lead. In addition, friction surfaces where there is evidence of abrasion and impact surfaces that are damaged or otherwise deteriorated from impact and that have a distinct painting history shall be tested for the presence of lead.

d. In residential dwellings, a minimum of two composite or single-surface dust samples shall be collected. One sample shall be collected from the floors and the other from the interior windowsills in rooms, hallways, or stairwells where at least one child under the age of six years is most likely to come in contact with dust.

e. In multifamily dwellings and child-occupied facilities, single-surface or composite dust samples shall also be collected from common areas where at least one child under the age of six years is likely to come in contact with dust.

f. Dust samples shall be collected by wipe samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. The minimum area for a floor wipe sample shall be 0.50 square feet or 72 square inches. The minimum area for a windowsill wipe sample and for a window trough wipe sample shall be 0.25 square feet or 36 square inches. Dust samples shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

g. Soil samples shall be collected and analyzed for lead content in exterior play areas and dripline areas where bare soil is present. In addition, soil samples shall be collected and analyzed for lead content from any other areas of the yard where bare soil is present. Soil and paint samples shall be collected using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department and shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

h. Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the National Institute of Standards and Technology 1.02 milligrams of lead per square centimeter standard reference material or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection.

(4) If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

(5) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

(6) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings by laboratory analysis, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

i. The following standards shall be used to determine whether a residential dwelling or child-occupied facility fails a lead hazard screen:

(1) A residential dwelling or child-occupied facility shall fail a lead hazard screen if any deteriorated paint or paint on friction or impact surfaces is found to be lead-based paint.

(2) A residential dwelling shall fail a lead hazard screen if any floor dust lead level in a single-surface or composite-surface dust sample is greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per square foot.

(3) A residential dwelling shall fail a lead hazard screen if any interior windowsill dust level in a single-surface or composite-surface dust sample is greater than or equal to 125 micrograms per square foot.

(4) A residential dwelling or child-occupied facility shall fail a lead hazard screen if any bare soil is found to be a soil-lead hazard.

j. When conducting a lead hazard screen in multifamily housing, a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may sample each residential dwelling or choose residential dwellings for sampling by random selection, targeted selection, or worst case selection.

(1) If built before 1960 or if the date of construction is unknown, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. If built from 1960 to 1977, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 10 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the number of residential dwellings to randomly select for testing.

(2) If the multifamily housing contains five or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use targeted selection. If using targeted selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than five similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested. Residential dwellings chosen by targeted selection shall meet as many of the following criteria as possible:

1. The residential dwelling has been cited with a housing or building code violation within the past year.

2. The property owner believes that the residential dwelling is in poor condition.

3. The residential dwelling contains two or more children between the ages of six months and six years. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall give preference to residential dwellings that house the largest number of children.

4. The residential dwelling serves as a day care facility.

5. The residential dwelling has been prepared for reoccupancy within the past three months.

If additional residential dwellings are needed to meet the minimum number specified in Table 2, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall select them randomly. If too many residential dwellings meet the criteria, residential dwellings shall be eliminated randomly.

Table 2

Minimum Number of Residential Dwellings in Multifamily Housing for Risk Assessment or Lead Hazard Screen Through Targeted Selection

Number of Similar Residential Dwellings

Number of Residential Dwellings to Sample*

1-4

All

5-20

4 residential dwellings or 50% (whichever is greater)**

21-75

10 residential dwellings or 20% (whichever is greater)**

76-125

17

126-175

19

176-225

20

226-300

21

301-400

22

401-500

23

501 +

24+1 residential dwelling for each additional increment of 100 residential dwellings or less

*Does not include residential dwellings housing children with elevated blood lead levels.

**For percentages, round up to determine number of residential dwellings to be sampled.

k. If the multifamily housing contains five or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use worst case selection. If using worst case selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than five similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested.

l. The following standards shall be used to determine whether multifamily housing fails a lead hazard screen:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean of the dust lead levels for carpeted floors, uncarpeted floors, and interior windowsills. If the arithmetic mean for carpeted floors or uncarpeted floors is greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per square foot, the multifamily housing shall fail the lead hazard screen. If the arithmetic mean for interior windowsills is greater than or equal to 125 micrograms per square foot, the multifamily housing shall fail the lead hazard screen. If the arithmetic mean for carpeted floors or uncarpeted floors is less than 25 micrograms per square foot, but some of the samples have dust lead levels that are greater than or equal to 25 micrograms per square foot, then the residential dwellings where these samples were taken and all other similar residential dwellings in the multifamily housing shall fail the lead hazard screen. If the arithmetic mean for interior windowsills is less than 125 micrograms per square foot, but some of the samples have dust lead levels that are greater than or equal to 125 micrograms per square foot, then the residential dwellings where these samples were taken and all other similar residential dwellings in the multifamily housing shall fail the lead hazard screen.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall evaluate the results of paint sampling by component and location. If all components at a given location are determined to be painted with lead-based paint or are determined to not be painted with lead-based paint, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume this condition is true for all similar residential dwellings. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not assume that the multifamily housing is free of lead-based paint. If a component at a given location is found to be painted with lead-based paint in some residential dwellings and not painted with lead-based paint in other residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the component is a lead-based paint hazard in all similar residential dwellings. If a component in a residential dwelling is determined or assumed to be lead-based paint, then the entire group of similar residential dwellings in the multifamily housing shall fail the lead hazard screen.

(3) Multifamily housing shall fail a lead hazard screen if any bare soil is found to be a soil-lead hazard.

m. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where a lead hazard screen is conducted. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the lead hazard screen, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of each written report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) Date of each lead hazard screen.

(2) Address of building.

(3) Date of construction.

(4) Apartment numbers (if applicable).

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility.

(6) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the lead hazard screen.

(7) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the lead hazard screen.

(8) Name, address, and telephone number of each recognized laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples, including the identification number for each such laboratory recognized by EPA under Section 405(b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2685(b)).

(9) Results of the visual inspection.

(10) Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer.

(11) If used, XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated.

(12) Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component tested expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used.

(13) All results of laboratory analysis of collected paint, dust, and soil samples. The results of dust sampling shall be reported in micrograms of lead per square foot, and the results of soil sampling shall be reported in parts per million of lead. Results shall not be reported as "not detectable."

(14) Any other sampling results.

(15) A statement that all painted or finished components that were not tested must be assumed to contain lead-based paint.

(16) Background information collected regarding the physical characteristics of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility and occupant use patterns that may cause lead-based paint exposure to at least one child under the age of six years.

(17) Whether the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility passed or failed the lead hazard screen and recommendations, if warranted, for a follow-up lead inspection or risk assessment, and, as appropriate, any further actions.

(18) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745.

(19) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70.

(20) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(5) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct risk assessments according to the following standards. Risk assessments shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. Background information regarding the physical characteristics of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility and occupant use patterns that may cause lead-based paint exposure to at least one child under the age of six years shall be collected.

b. A visual inspection for risk assessment shall be undertaken to locate the existence of deteriorated paint and other potential lead hazards and to assess the extent and causes of the paint deterioration.

c. If deteriorated paint is present, each surface with deteriorated paint which is determined to have a distinct painting history must be tested for the presence of lead.

d. Friction surfaces where there is evidence of abrasion and impact surfaces that are damaged or otherwise deteriorated from impact and that have a distinct painting history shall be tested for the presence of lead.

e. In residential dwellings, dust samples shall be collected from the interior windowsill, window trough, and floor in all living areas where at least one child is most likely to come in contact with dust. Dust samples shall be analyzed for lead concentration and may be either composite or single-surface samples.

f. In multifamily dwellings, dust samples shall also be collected from interior windowsills, window troughs, and floors in common areas adjacent to the sampled residential dwellings or child-occupied facility and in other common areas where the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor determines that at least one child under the age of six years is likely to come in contact with dust. Dust samples shall be analyzed for lead concentration and may be either composite or single-surface samples.

g. In child-occupied facilities, dust samples shall be collected from the interior windowsill, window trough, and floor in each room, hallway, or stairwell utilized by one or more children under the age of six years and in other common areas where the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor determines that at least one child under the age of six years is likely to come in contact with dust. Dust samples shall be analyzed for lead concentration and may be either composite or single-surface samples.

h. Soil samples shall be collected and analyzed for lead content in exterior play areas and dripline areas where bare soil is present. In addition, soil samples shall be collected and analyzed for lead content from any other areas of the yard where bare soil is present.

i. Dust samples shall be collected by wipe samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. The minimum area for a floor wipe sample shall be 0.50 square feet. The minimum area for a windowsill wipe sample and for a window trough wipe sample shall be 0.25 square feet. Soil and paint samples shall be collected using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. Dust and soil samples shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead. The results of dust sampling shall be reported in micrograms of lead per square foot, and the results of soil sampling shall be reported in parts per million of lead. The results shall not be reported as "not detectable."

j. Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the NIST 1.02 standard film material or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that any surface is free of lead-based paint unless the NIST 1.02 standard film is used for calibration.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection.

(4) If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all of the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

(5) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

(6) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings by laboratory analysis, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

k. When conducting a risk assessment in multifamily housing, a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may sample each residential dwelling or choose residential dwellings for sampling by random selection, targeted selection, or worst case selection.

(1) If built before 1960 or if the date of construction is unknown, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. If built from 1960 to 1977, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 10 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the number of residential dwellings to randomly select for testing.

(2) If the multifamily housing contains five or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use targeted selection. If using targeted selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than five similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested. Residential dwellings chosen by targeted selection shall meet as many of the following criteria as possible. If additional residential dwellings are needed to meet the minimum number specified in Table 2, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall select them randomly. If too many residential dwellings meet the criteria, residential dwellings shall be eliminated randomly. Targeted selection criteria are as follows:

1. The residential dwelling has been cited with a housing or building code violation within the past year.

2. The property owner believes that the residential dwelling is in poor condition.

3. The residential dwelling contains two or more children between the ages of six months and six years. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall give preference to residential dwellings that house the largest number of children.

4. The residential dwelling serves as a day care facility.

5. The residential dwelling has been prepared for reoccupancy within the past three months.

(3) If the multifamily housing contains five or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use worst case selection. If using worst case selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than five similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested.

(4) The following standards shall be used to determine the extent of lead-based paint hazards throughout multifamily housing that is sampled by random selection, targeted selection, or worst case selection:

1. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean of the dust lead levels for carpeted floors, uncarpeted floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs. If the arithmetic mean is greater than or equal to the level defined as a dust lead hazard for the component, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall determine that a dust lead hazard has been identified on the component throughout the multifamily housing. If the arithmetic mean is less than the level defined as a dust lead hazard for the component, but some of the individual components have dust lead levels that are greater than or equal to the level defined as a dust lead hazard, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall determine that a dust lead hazard has been identified on the individual components and on all other similar components throughout the multifamily housing.

2. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall evaluate the results of paint sampling by component and location. If all components at a given location are determined to be painted with lead-based paint or are determined to not be painted with lead-based paint, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume this condition is true for all similar residential dwellings. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not assume that the multifamily housing is free of lead-based paint. If a component at a given location is found to be painted with lead-based paint in some residential dwellings and not painted with lead-based paint in other residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the component is a lead-based paint hazard in all similar residential dwellings.

l. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where a risk assessment is conducted. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the risk assessment, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of the report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) Date of each risk assessment;

(2) Address of building;

(3) Date of construction;

(4) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(6) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the risk assessment;

(7) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the risk assessment;

(8) Name, address, and telephone number of each recognized laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples, including the identification number for each such laboratory recognized by EPA under Section 405(b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2685(b));

(9) Results of the visual inspection;

(10) Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer;

(11) If used, XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated;

(12) Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component tested expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

(13) All results of laboratory analysis of collected paint, dust, and soil samples;

(14) Any other sampling results;

(15) A statement that all painted or finished components that were not tested must be assumed to contain lead-based paint;

(16) Background information collected regarding the physical characteristics of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility and occupant use patterns that may cause lead-based paint exposure to at least one child under the age of six years;

(17) To the extent that they are used as part of the lead-based paint hazard determination, the results of any previous inspections or analyses for the presence of lead-based paint, or other assessments of lead-based paint hazards;

(18) A description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the play area or in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

(19) A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

(20) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(21) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(22) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(6) A certified lead abatement contractor or certified lead abatement worker must conduct lead abatement according to the following standards. Lead abatement shall be conducted only by a certified lead abatement contractor or a certified lead abatement worker.

a. A certified lead abatement contractor must be on site during all work site preparation and during the postabatement cleanup of work areas. At all other times when lead abatement is being conducted, the certified lead abatement contractor shall be on site or available by telephone, pager, or answering service, and be able to be present at the work site in no more than two hours.

b. A certified lead abatement contractor shall ensure that lead abatement is conducted according to all federal, state, and local requirements.

c. A certified lead abatement contractor shall notify the department in writing at least seven days prior to the commencement of lead abatement in a residential dwelling or child-occupied facility. The notification shall include the following information:

(1) The address, including apartment numbers, where lead abatement will be conducted.

(2) The dates when lead abatement will be conducted.

(3) The name, address, telephone number, Iowa certification number, and signature of the contact for the certified firm that will conduct the work.

(4) The name, address, telephone number, Iowa certification number, and signature of the certified lead abatement contractor who will serve as the contact person for the project.

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the property owner.

(6) Whether the dwelling is owner-occupied or a rental dwelling.

(7) If the dwelling is an occupied rental, the names of the occupants.

(8) The approximate year that the dwelling was built.

(9) A brief description of the lead abatement work to be done.

d. A certified lead abatement contractor shall submit a revised notification to the department if any information in the original notification changes.

e. A certified lead abatement contractor shall ensure that the worksite(s) is accessed only by certified lead professionals according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135). Noncertified individuals shall not be allowed access to a worksite. A worksite shall remain inaccessible to noncertified individuals until it passes clearance testing.

f. A certified lead abatement contractor or a certified project designer shall develop a written occupant protection plan for all lead abatement projects prior to starting lead abatement and shall implement the occupant protection plan during the lead abatement project. The occupant protection plan shall be unique to each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility. If the occupants will be living at the property where lead abatement is taking place, then the written occupant plan shall be given to the occupants prior to the start date of the lead abatement project and must contain at least the following information:

(1) A description of the type and location of the physical barriers that will keep occupants out of the designated worksite(s).

(2) An explanation of how the contractor will ensure that the worksite(s) is not entered by the occupants.

(3) An explanation of how the contractor will ensure that the occupants have access to a kitchen, bathroom, and living area that are not in the worksite(s).

g. Approved methods must be used to conduct lead abatement, and prohibited work practices must not be used to conduct lead abatement.

(1) Signs must be posted and readable. All signs must be posted before lead abatement begins and must remain in place until dust-lead clearance has been passed.

1. To the extent practicable, all signage must be posted in the occupants' primary language.

2. The signs must clearly define the work area.

3. The signs must warn occupants and other persons not involved with the lead abatement to remain outside the work area.

4. The signs must be posted at the entrance(s) to all work areas.

(2) The work area must be effectively contained before the lead abatement begins. To be effective, containment must:

1. Isolate the work area so that no dust or debris leaves the work area while the lead abatement is being performed.

2. Be monitored and maintained so that any plastic or other impermeable materials are not torn or displaced.

3. Be installed in such a manner that it does not interfere with occupant and worker egress in an emergency.

(3) For interior lead abatement, containment shall include:

1. The removal or covering of all objects from the work area, including but not limited to furniture, rugs, and window coverings. Objects that are not removed from the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material with all seams and edges taped or otherwise sealed.

2. Closing and covering all duct openings in the work area. Ducts must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material that is taped down.

3. Closing windows and doors in the work area. Doors must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as an entrance to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass through while confining dust and debris to the work area.

4. Covering the floor surface, including installed carpet, with taped-down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in the work area six feet beyond the perimeter of the surfaces undergoing lead abatement or a sufficient distance to contain the dust, whichever is greater.

5. Ensuring that all personnel, tools, and other items, including the exteriors of containers of waste, are free of dust and debris before leaving or being removed from the work area.

(4) For exterior lead abatement, containment shall include:

1. Closing all doors and windows within 20 feet of the lead abatement. On multistory buildings, all doors and windows within 20 feet of the lead abatement on the same story as the lead abatement shall be closed, and all doors and windows on all stories below the lead abatement that are the same horizontal distance from the lead abatement shall be closed.

2. Ensuring that doors within the work areas that will be used while the lead abatement is being performed are covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass through while confining dust and debris to the work area.

3. Covering the ground with plastic sheeting or other disposable impermeable material extending 10 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing lead abatement or a sufficient distance to collect falling paint debris, whichever is greater, unless the property line prevents 10 feet of such ground cover. Exterior ground cover shall include anchors or weights to ensure that the covering remains effective even during weather conditions such as high wind.

4. Vertical containment. In certain situations, such as where other buildings are in close proximity to the work area, when conditions are windy, or where the work area abuts a property line, the certified lead abatement contractor or certified lead abatement worker shall erect a system of vertical containment designed to prevent dust and debris from migrating to adjacent property or contaminating the ground, other buildings, or any object beyond the work area.

(5) The following are prohibited work practices:

1. Open-flame burning or torching of lead-based paint.

2. Machine sanding or grinding or abrasive blasting or sandblasting of lead-based paint unless used with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) exhaust control that removes particles of 0.3 microns or larger from the air at 99.97 percent or greater efficiency.

3. Uncontained water blasting of lead-based paint.

4. Dry scraping or dry sanding of lead-based paint except in conjunction with the use of a heat gun or around electrical outlets.

5. Operating a heat gun at a temperature at or above 1100 degrees Fahrenheit.

(6) All waste generated during lead abatement shall be contained to prevent the release of dust and debris before the waste is removed from the work area for storage or disposal. Any chutes used to remove waste from the work area shall be covered.

1. At the conclusion of each workday and at the conclusion of the lead abatement, waste that has been collected from lead abatement activities must be stored under containment, in an enclosure, or behind a barrier that prevents release of dust and debris out of the work area and prevents access to dust and debris.

2. All waste from lead abatement must be contained during transportation so that no dust or debris is released.

(7) The work area shall be cleaned so that no dust, debris, or residue remains after lead abatement. Cleaning shall include:

1. The collection of all paint chips and debris and, without dispersing the paint chips and debris, the sealing of the materials in heavy-duty bags.

2. The removal of the protective sheeting used as required in this subrule. The sheeting shall be misted, then the sheeting shall be folded dirty side inward. All sheeting shall be taped shut or otherwise sealed inside heavy-duty bags. Sheeting used to separate work areas from non-work areas must remain in place until after the cleaning and removal of other sheeting. All sheeting shall be disposed of as waste.

3. For interior lead abatement, all objects and surfaces in the work area and within two feet of the work area must be cleaned from high to low in the following manner:

* Walls must either be vacuumed with a HEPA vacuum or wiped with a wet cloth, beginning at the ceiling and working toward the floor.

* All remaining surfaces including objects and fixtures must be thoroughly vacuumed with a HEPA vacuum. For carpeted floors and rugs, the HEPA vacuum must be equipped with a beater bar.

* All remaining surfaces, except for carpeted or upholstered surfaces, must also be wiped with a damp cloth. Uncarpeted floors must be thoroughly mopped using a method that keeps the wash water separate from the rinse water, such as the two-bucket mopping method, or using a wet mopping system.

h. Soil abatement shall be conducted using one of the following methods:

(1) If soil is removed, soil that is a soil-lead hazard shall be replaced by soil with a lead concentration as close to the local background as practicable, but less than 400 parts per million. The soil that is removed shall not be used as topsoil at another residential property or child-occupied facility.

(2) If soil is not removed, the soil that is a soil-lead hazard shall be remediated to meet the definition of "permanently covered soil."

i. If lead-based paint is removed from a surface, the surface shall be repainted or refinished prior to postabatement clearance dust sampling. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall visually verify that lead-based paint was removed from a surface prior to repainting or refinishing.

j. If components painted with lead-based paint are removed, the replacement components shall be installed prior to postabatement clearance testing.

k. Postabatement clearance procedures shall be conducted by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. If the abatement is conducted in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, clearance must be conducted by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. Postabatement clearance testing shall be performed by persons or entities independent of those performing lead abatement, unless the designated party uses qualified in-house employees to conduct postabatement clearance testing. An in-house employee shall not conduct both lead abatement and the postabatement clearance testing for this work. Postabatement clearance testing shall be conducted using the following procedures:

(1) Following a lead abatement, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall review the report of the lead inspection, risk assessment, or visual assessment done prior to the lead abatement project and the lead abatement specifications to determine the lead-based paint hazards that were to be abated by the lead abatement project. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall perform a visual inspection to determine if all lead-based paint hazards that were to be abated have been abated and to determine if deteriorated paint surfaces or visible amounts of dust, debris, or residue are still present in the rooms where lead abatement was conducted. If lead-based paint hazards that were to be abated by the project or deteriorated paint surfaces or visible amounts of dust, debris, or residue are present in the rooms where lead abatement was conducted, these conditions must be eliminated prior to the continuation of the clearance procedures. However, elimination of deteriorated paint is not required if it has been determined through paint testing or a lead-based paint inspection that the deteriorated paint is not lead-based paint. Following an exterior lead abatement, a visual inspection shall be conducted to determine if all lead-based paint hazards that were to be abated have been abated and to determine if any visible dust or debris remains on any horizontal surfaces in the outdoor living areas close to the abated surface. In addition, a visual inspection shall be conducted to determine the presence of paint chips on the dripline or next to the foundation below any exterior surface that was abated. If lead-based paint hazards that were to be abated by the project are still present, these conditions must be eliminated prior to the continuation of the clearance procedures. If visible dust, debris, or paint chips are present, they must be removed from the site and properly disposed of according to all applicable federal, state, and local standards.

(2) Following the visual inspection and any required postabatement cleanup, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct clearance sampling for lead in dust. Clearance sampling may be conducted by employing single-surface sampling or composite dust sampling. Interior dust-lead testing shall be performed for all projects that include window replacement.

(3) Dust samples shall be collected a minimum of one hour after the completion of final postabatement cleanup activities.

(4) Dust samples shall be collected by wipe samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. The minimum area for a floor wipe sample shall be 0.50 square feet or 72 square inches. The minimum area for a windowsill wipe sample and for a window trough wipe sample shall be 0.25 square feet or 36 square inches. Dust samples shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

(5) The following postabatement clearance activities shall be conducted as appropriate based upon the extent or manner of lead abatement activities conducted in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility:

1. After conducting a lead abatement with containment between abated and unabated areas, three dust samples shall be taken from each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area. Dust samples shall be taken from one interior windowsill and from one window trough (if available), and one dust sample shall be taken from the floor of each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area. In addition, one dust sample shall be taken from the floor outside of each individual containment area. If there are fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area, then all rooms, hallways, and stairwells shall be sampled.

2. After conducting a lead abatement with no containment between abated and unabated areas, three dust samples shall be taken from each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility. Dust samples shall be taken from one interior windowsill and from one window trough (if available), and one dust sample shall be taken from the floor of each room, hallway, or stairwell selected. If there are fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility, then all rooms, hallways, and stairwells shall be sampled.

3. The certified lead abatement contractors and certified lead abatement workers who abate or clean the dwellings shall not have any knowledge of which rooms or surfaces will be selected for the dust samples.

(6) Reserved.

(7) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall compare the residual lead level as determined by the laboratory analysis from each single-surface dust sample with applicable single-surface clearance levels for lead in dust on floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs. If the residual lead level in a single-surface dust sample is greater than or equal to the applicable clearance level for a floor, interior windowsill, or window trough, then the failed component in each room with a failed single-surface dust sample and that type of component in each room that was not tested shall be recleaned. Additional clearance samples shall be taken from the failed component in each room where it failed and from enough additional rooms that were not previously tested so that four rooms are sampled. If four rooms are not available, then each available room shall be retested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall evaluate the results of this testing to determine if the recleaned components meet the clearance level. The components must be recleaned and retested until the clearance level is met.

(8) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall compare the residual lead level as determined by the laboratory analysis from each composite dust sample with applicable single-surface clearance levels for lead in dust on floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs divided by half the number of subsamples in the composite sample. If the residual lead level in a composite dust sample is greater than or equal to the applicable clearance level divided by half the number of subsamples in the composite sample, then all the components represented by the failed composite dust sample shall be recleaned and retested until clearance levels are met.

l. In multifamily housing consisting of at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings, random selection for the purpose of clearance testing may be conducted if the following conditions are met:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall randomly select the residential dwellings that will be sampled. The certified lead abatement contractors and certified lead abatement workers who abate or clean the dwellings do not know which residential dwellings will be selected for the random selection or which rooms or surfaces will be selected for the dust samples.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the minimum number of residential dwellings selected for dust sampling. This shall provide a 95 percent level of confidence that no more than 5 percent or 50 of the residential dwellings (whichever is smaller) in the randomly sampled population are greater than or equal to the appropriate clearance levels.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall sample the randomly selected residential dwellings and evaluate them for clearance according to the procedures found in paragraphs 70.6(6)"i" through"k."

m. No later than three weeks after the property passes clearance, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a report to the lead abatement contractor that contains the items required by subparagraphs 70.6(6)"n" (7) through (9).

n. The certified lead abatement contractor or a certified project designer shall prepare a lead abatement report containing the following information:

(1) A copy of the original and any revised lead abatement notifications.

(2) Starting and completion dates of the lead abatement project.

(3) The name, address, and telephone number of the property owner(s).

(4) The name, address, and signature of the certified lead abatement contractor and of the certified firm contact for the firm conducting the lead abatement.

(5) Whether or not containment was used and, if containment was used, the locations of the containment.

(6) The occupant protection plan required by paragraph 70.6(6)"f."

(7) The name, address, and signature of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting clearance sampling, the date on which the clearance testing was conducted, the results of the visual inspection for the presence of lead hazards that were not abated as specified, deteriorated paint and visible dust, debris, residue, or paint chips in the interior rooms and exterior areas where lead abatement was conducted, and the results of all postabatement clearance testing and all soil analyses, if applicable. The results of dust sampling shall be reported in micrograms of lead per square foot by location of sample, and the results of soil sampling shall be reported in parts per million of lead. The results shall not be reported as "not detectable." If random selection was used to select the residential dwellings that were sampled, the report shall state that random selection was used, the number of residential dwellings that were sampled, and how this number was determined.

(8) A statement that the lead abatement was or was not done as specified and that the rooms and exterior areas where lead abatement was conducted did or did not pass the visual clearance and the clearance dust testing. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the clearance testing cannot verify that all lead-based paint hazards have been abated, the report shall contain the following statement:

"The purpose of this clearance report is to verify that the lead abatement project was done according to the project specifications. This residential dwelling may still contain hazardous lead-based paint, soil-lead hazards, or dust-lead hazards in the rooms or exterior areas that were not included in the lead abatement project."

(9) The name, address, and telephone number of each recognized laboratory conducting an analysis of clearance samples and soil samples, including the identification number for each such laboratory recognized by EPA under Section 405(b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2685(b)).

(10) A detailed written description of the lead abatement project, including lead abatement methods used, locations of rooms and components where lead abatement occurred, reasons for selecting particular lead abatement methods, and any suggested monitoring of encapsulants or enclosures.

(11) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745.

(12) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70.

(13) If applicable, a copy of the written consent or waiver required by subrule 70.6(13).

o. The lead abatement report shall be completed no later than 30 days after the lead abatement project passes clearance testing.

p. The certified lead abatement contractor shall maintain all reports and plans required in this subrule for a minimum of three years.

q. The certified lead abatement contractor shall provide a copy of all reports required by this subrule to the building owner and to the person who contracted for the lead abatement, if different.

(7) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician must conduct visual risk assessments according to the following standards. Provided that all of the following standards are met, a certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician may remotely conduct a visual risk assessment using technology that allows for adequate visual evaluation of the painted surfaces. Visual risk assessments shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician.

a. Background information regarding the physical characteristics of the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility and occupant use patterns that may cause lead-based paint exposure to at least one child under the age of six years shall be collected.

b. A visual inspection for risk assessment shall be undertaken to locate the existence of deteriorated paint and other potential lead-based paint hazards and to assess the extent and causes of the paint deterioration. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall assess each component in each room, including each exterior side. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall identify the following conditions as potential lead-based paint hazards:

(1) All interior and exterior surfaces with deteriorated paint.

(2) Horizontal hard surfaces, including but not limited to floors and windowsills, that are not smooth or cleanable.

(3) Dust-generating conditions, including but not limited to conditions causing rubbing, binding, or crushing of surfaces known or presumed to be coated with lead-based paint.

(4) Bare soil in the play area and dripline of the home.

c. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where a visual risk assessment is conducted. No later than three weeks after completing the visual risk assessment, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the visual risk assessment, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall maintain a copy of the report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) Date of each visual risk assessment;

(2) Address of building;

(3) Date of construction;

(4) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(6) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified sampling technician, certified lead inspector/risk assessor, or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the visual risk assessment;

(7) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the visual risk assessment;

(8) A statement that all painted or finished components must be assumed to contain lead-based paint;

(9) Specific locations of painted or finished components identified as likely to contain lead-based paint and likely to be lead-based paint hazards;

(10) Specific locations of bare soil in the play area and the dripline of a home;

(11) If a remote visual risk assessment is conducted, a description of the methodologies used;

(12) Information for the owner and occupants on how to reduce lead hazards in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(13) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(14) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69, and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(15) The following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a sampling technician, lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(8) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician must conduct clearance testing according to the following standards. Clearance testing following lead abatement shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. Clearance testing after renovation and clearance testing after interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, and rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 shall be conducted only by certified sampling technicians, certified lead inspector/risk assessors, or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessors. If the abatement, renovation, or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 is conducted in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, clearance must be conducted by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. Clearance testing following lead abatement shall be conducted according to paragraphs 70.6(6)"i" through"m."

b. Clearance testing after renovation and clearance testing after interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 shall be conducted according to the following standards:

(1) A certified sampling technician shall perform clearance testing only for a single-family property or for individual residential dwellings and associated common areas in multifamily housing. A certified sampling technician shall not perform clearance testing using random selection of residential dwellings or common areas in multifamily housing.

(2) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall review the report of the lead inspection, risk assessment, or visual assessment done prior to interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 and the project specifications to determine the lead-based paint hazards that were to be controlled by the project. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall perform a visual inspection to determine if all lead-based paint hazards that were to be controlled by the project have been controlled and to determine if deteriorated paint surfaces or visible amounts of dust, debris, or residue are still present in the rooms where interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation were conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35. If lead-based paint hazards that were to be controlled by the project, deteriorated paint surfaces or visible amounts of dust, debris, or residue are present in these rooms, these conditions must be eliminated prior to the continuation of the clearance testing.

However, elimination of deteriorated paint is not required if it has been determined through a lead-based paint inspection that the deteriorated paint is not lead-based paint. If exterior painted surfaces have been disturbed by the interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35, the visual inspection shall include an assessment to determine if all exterior lead-based paint hazards that were to be controlled by the project have been controlled and to determine if any visible dust or debris remains on any horizontal surfaces in the outdoor living areas close to the affected exterior painted surfaces. In addition, a visual inspection shall be conducted to determine if paint chips are present on the dripline or next to the foundation below any exterior painted surface that was treated. If lead-based paint hazards that were to be controlled by the project are still present, these conditions must be eliminated prior to the continuation of the clearance procedures. If visible dust, debris, or paint chips are present, they must be removed from the site and properly disposed of according to all applicable federal, state, and local standards.

(3) Following the visual inspection and any required cleanup, clearance sampling for lead in dust shall be conducted. Clearance sampling may be conducted by employing single-surface sampling or composite dust sampling.

(4) Dust samples shall be collected a minimum of one hour after the completion of final cleanup activities.

(5) Dust samples shall be collected by wipe samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. The minimum area for a floor wipe sample shall be 0.50 square feet or 72 square inches. The minimum area for a windowsill wipe sample and for a window trough wipe sample shall be 0.25 square feet or 36 square inches. Dust samples shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

(6) The following clearance activities shall be conducted as appropriate based upon the extent or manner of renovation or of interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility:

1. After conducting renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35, with containment between treated and untreated areas, three dust samples shall be taken from each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area. Dust samples shall be taken from one interior windowsill and from one window trough (if available), and one dust sample shall be taken from the floor of each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area. In addition, one dust sample shall be taken from the floor outside of each individual containment area. If there are fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells within the containment area, then all rooms, hallways, and stairwells shall be sampled. Interior dust-lead testing shall be performed for all projects that include window replacement.

2. After conducting renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35, with no containment between treated and untreated areas, three dust samples shall be taken from each of no fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility. Dust samples shall be taken from one interior windowsill and window trough (if available), and one dust sample shall be taken from the floor of each room, hallway, or stairwell selected. If there are fewer than four rooms, hallways, or stairwells in the residential dwelling or child-occupied facility, then all rooms, hallways, and stairwells shall be sampled. Interior dust-lead testing shall be performed for all projects that include window replacement.

(7) The contractors conducting the work or cleaning the dwellings shall not know which rooms or surfaces will be selected for the dust samples.

(8) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall compare the residual lead level as determined by the laboratory analysis from each single-surface dust sample with applicable single-surface clearance levels for lead in dust on floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs. If the residual lead level in a single-surface dust sample is greater than or equal to the applicable clearance level for a floor, interior windowsill, or window trough, then the failed component in each room with a failed single-surface dust sample and that type of component in each room that was not tested shall be recleaned. Additional clearance samples shall be taken from the failed component in each room where it failed and from enough additional rooms that were not previously tested so that four rooms are sampled. If four rooms are not available, then each available room shall be retested. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall evaluate the results of this testing to determine if the recleaned components meet the clearance level. The components must be recleaned and retested until the clearance level is met.

(9) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall compare the residual lead level as determined by the laboratory analysis from each composite dust sample with applicable single-surface clearance levels for lead in dust on floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs divided by half the number of subsamples in the composite sample. If the residual lead level in a composite dust sample is greater than or equal to the applicable clearance level divided by half the number of subsamples in the composite sample, then all the components represented by the failed composite dust sample shall be recleaned and retested until clearance levels are met.

c. In multifamily housing consisting of at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings, random selection for the purpose of clearance testing may be conducted if the following conditions are met:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall randomly select the dwellings that will be sampled. The contractors and the workers who conducted the lead abatement, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation do not know which residential dwellings will be selected for the random selection.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the minimum number of dwellings selected for dust sampling. This shall provide a 95 percent level of confidence that no more than 5 percent or 50 of the residential dwellings (whichever is smaller) in the randomly sampled population are greater than or equal to the appropriate clearance levels.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall sample the randomly selected residential dwellings and evaluate them for clearance according to the procedures found in paragraphs 70.6(6)"h" through"j."

(4) The clearance testing is conducted by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

d. A clearance report must be prepared that provides documentation of the lead abatement, renovation, or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 as well as the clearance testing. When lead abatement is performed, the report shall be a lead abatement report in accordance with paragraph 70.6(6)"n." When renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 is performed, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where clearance testing is conducted. No later than 30 days after the property passes clearance, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the clearance testing, if different. The clearance report shall include the following information:

(1) The address of the residential property and, if only part of a multifamily property is affected, the specific dwelling units and common areas affected.

(2) The following information regarding the clearance testing:

1. The date(s) of the clearance testing.

2. The name, address, and signature of each certified lead professional performing the clearance examination, including the certification number.

3. The name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the clearance testing.

4. Whether or not containment was used and, if containment was used, the locations of the containment.

5. If random selection was used to select the residential dwellings that were sampled, the report shall state that random selection was used, the number of residential dwellings that were sampled, and how this number was determined.

6. The results of the visual inspection for the presence of deteriorated paint and visible dust, debris, residue, or paint chips in the rooms where renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation was conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35.

7. All of the results of the analysis of dust samples, in micrograms per square foot, by location of sample. The results shall not be reported as "not detectable."

8. A statement that the renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 was or was not done as specified and that the rooms and exterior areas where these activities were conducted did or did not pass the visual clearance and the clearance dust testing. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician conducting the clearance testing cannot verify that all lead-based paint hazards have been controlled, the report shall contain the following statement:

"The purpose of this clearance report is to verify that this lead hazard control project was done according to the project specifications. This residential dwelling may still contain hazardous lead-based paint, soil-lead hazards, or dust-lead hazards in the rooms or exterior areas that were not included in the lead hazard control project."

9. The name, address, and telephone number of each recognized laboratory conducting an analysis of the dust samples, including the identification number for each such laboratory recognized by EPA under Section 405(b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2685(b)).

(3) The following information on the renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 for which clearance testing was performed:

1. The start and completion dates of the renovation, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation.

2. The name and address of each firm or organization conducting the renovation, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation and the name of each supervisor assigned.

3. A detailed written description of the renovation, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation, including the methods used, locations of exterior surfaces, interior rooms, common areas, and components where the hazard reduction activity occurred.

4. If interim control of soil hazards was conducted, a detailed description of the location(s) of the interim controls and the method(s) used.

5. Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745.

6. Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70.

7. The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a sampling technician, lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

e. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor or a certified sampling technician shall maintain a copy of the clearance testing information included in the lead abatement report specified in paragraph 70.6(6)"m " for no fewer than three years. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor, a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or a certified sampling technician shall maintain a copy of the clearance testing report specified in paragraph 70.6(8)"d" for no fewer than three years.

f. Clearance testing shall be performed by persons or entities independent of those performing lead abatement, renovation, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation, unless the designated party uses qualified in-house employees to conduct clearance testing. An in-house employee shall not conduct both lead abatement, renovation, interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, or rehabilitation and the clearance examination for this work.

(9) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct paint testing pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 according to the following standards. Paint testing pursuant to 24 CFR Part 3 5 shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. When conducting paint testing in a residential dwelling or child-occupied facility, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following procedures:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall test paint on each deteriorated paint surface and on each painted surface that will be disturbed or replaced. On windows, the window frame, interior windowsill, window sash, and window trough shall each be tested.

(2) Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If testing by laboratory analysis, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect paint samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

1. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

2. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the NIST 1.02 standard film or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that any surface is free of lead-based paint unless the NIST 1.02 standard film is used for calibration.

3. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings at the beginning of the inspection.

4. If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all of the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

5. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

6. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings by laboratory analysis, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

b. If lead-based paint is identified through paint testing, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct a visual inspection to determine the presence of lead-based paint hazards and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated.

c. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where paint testing is conducted. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the inspection, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of each written report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) A statement that the inspection was conducted to determine whether lead-based paint is present on deteriorated paint surfaces and on painted surfaces that will be disturbed or replaced;

(2) Date of the testing;

(3) Address of building;

(4) Date of construction;

(5) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(6) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(7) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the paint testing;

(8) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the paint testing;

(9) Name, address, and telephone number of each laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples;

(10) Each testing method and sampling procedure employed for paint analysis, including quality control data and, if used, the manufacturer, serial number, software, and operating mode of any X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analyzer;

(11) XRF readings taken for calibration and calculations to demonstrate that the XRF is properly calibrated;

(12) Specific locations by room of each painted component tested for the presence of lead-based paint and the results for each component expressed in terms appropriate to the sampling method used;

(13) A statement that all painted or finished components that were not tested must be assumed to contain lead-based paint;

(14) A description of the location, type, and severity of identified lead-based paint hazards, including the classification of each tested surface as to whether it is a lead-based paint hazard, and any other potential lead hazards, including bare soil in the dripline of a home where lead-based paint is identified on exterior components or lead-based paint previously existed on exterior components, but has been removed, enclosed, or encapsulated;

(15) A description of interim controls and lead abatement options for each identified lead-based paint hazard and a suggested prioritization for addressing each hazard. If the use of an encapsulant or enclosure is recommended, the report shall recommend a maintenance and monitoring schedule for the encapsulant or enclosure;

(16) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(17) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(18) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3 (135) and 70.5(135)."

(10) A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor must conduct reevaluations according to the following standards. Reevaluations shall be conducted only by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

a. All available information regarding lead-based paint for the property being reevaluated shall be reviewed, including but not limited to reports of any lead-based paint activities conducted in a residential dwelling, multifamily dwelling, or child-occupied facility.

b. A visual inspection of the property shall be undertaken to locate the existence of deteriorated paint; bare soil; recommended lead abatement, interim controls, or standard treatments that were not implemented; and failed interim controls, standard treatments, encapsulation, or enclosure.

c. Deteriorated paint for which the lead content is unknown shall be tested for the presence of lead.

d. Soil samples shall be collected and analyzed from bare soil for which the lead content is unknown. Soil samples shall be collected using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department and shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

e. If any lead-based paint hazards, recommended lead abatement, interim controls, or standard treatments that were not implemented, or failed interim controls, standard treatments, encapsulation, or enclosure is identified, then the reevaluation is failed. These conditions shall be controlled through lead abatement or interim controls before the reevaluation can continue. Clearance testing shall be conducted following control of the conditions through lead abatement or interim controls.

f. If there are no lead-based paint hazards present and all of the recommended lead abatement or interim controls were implemented and have not failed, then single-surface or composite dust samples shall be collected. The reevaluation is passed if all of the dust samples taken are below the clearance level.

g. In residential dwellings, single-surface or composite dust samples shall be collected from floors and interior windowsills in at least four rooms, hallways, or stairwells where at least one child under the age of six years is most likely to come in contact with dust.

h. In multifamily dwellings, single-surface or composite dust samples shall also be collected from common areas where at least one child under the age of six years is likely to come in contact with dust.

i. In child-occupied facilities, single-surface or composite dust samples shall be collected from the floor and interior windowsill in at least four rooms, hallways, or stairwells utilized by one or more children under the age of six years and in other common areas where the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor determines that at least one child under the age of six years is likely to come in contact with dust.

j. Dust samples shall be collected by wipe samples using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. The minimum area for a floor wipe sample shall be 0.50 square feet or 72 square inches. The minimum area for a windowsill wipe sample and for a window trough wipe sample shall be 0.25 square feet or 36 square inches. Dust samples shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory to determine the level of lead.

k. Paint shall be tested using adequate quality control by X-ray fluorescence or by laboratory analysis using a recognized laboratory to determine the presence of lead-based paint on a surface. If tested by laboratory analysis, the paint shall be sampled using the documented methodologies specified in guidance documents issued by the department. If testing by X-ray fluorescence, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the following methodologies:

(1) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use an X-ray fluorescence analyzer that has a performance characteristics sheet and shall use the X-ray fluorescence analyzer according to the performance characteristics sheet.

(2) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use the NIST 1.02 standard film or standards provided by the manufacturer for calibration of the X-ray fluorescence analyzer. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not state that any surface is free of lead-based paint unless the NIST 1.02 standard film is used for calibration.

(3) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall take calibration readings consisting of an average of three readings.

(4) If recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall conduct substrate correction for all XRF readings less than 4.0 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each substrate that requires substrate correction, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall completely remove all paint from an area of two different testing combinations for that substrate. If possible, the areas chosen for substrate correction should have initial XRF readings of less than 2.5 milligrams of lead per square centimeter. For each testing combination, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall remove paint from an area that is at least as large as the XRF probe faceplate. On each of the two areas, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall place the NIST 1.02 standard film over the surface, and take three XRF readings with the XRF used to conduct the inspection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean for these six readings and shall subtract 1.02 from this arithmetic mean to obtain the substrate correction value. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall then subtract the substrate correction value from each XRF reading for the substrate requiring substrate correction to obtain the corrected XRF reading. For example, if the six readings taken on the NIST 1.02 standard film were 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.1, the arithmetic mean is calculated by the equation (1.1 + 1.3 + 1.4 + 1.0 + 1.2 + 1.1)/6 and is equal to 1.18. The substrate correction value is equal to 1.18 minus 1.02, or 0.16. If the certified lead inspector/ risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not conduct substrate correction where recommended by the performance characteristics sheet, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that all of the readings are positive and shall not state that a surface is free of lead-based paint.

(5) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall classify each XRF reading that did not require substrate correction and each corrected XRF reading for XRF readings that required substrate correction as positive, negative, or inconclusive, according to the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not discard XRF readings unless instructed to do so by the performance characteristics sheet or the operating instructions from the manufacturer. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor believes that a reading classified as positive is in error, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall collect a paint sample for laboratory analysis. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall change the positive classification to negative only if the results of the laboratory analysis indicate that the surface is not painted with lead-based paint. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume that all inconclusive readings are positive and classify them as such.

(6) The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall resolve inconclusive readings as defined by the performance characteristics sheet for the XRF by collecting paint samples for laboratory analysis. If the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor does not resolve inconclusive readings by laboratory analysis, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the inconclusive readings are positive.

l. When conducting reevaluation in multifamily housing, a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may sample each residential dwelling or choose residential dwellings for sampling by random selection, targeted selection, or worst case selection.

(1) If built before 1960 or if the date of construction is unknown, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 20 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. If built from 1960 to 1977, the multifamily housing shall contain at least 10 similarly constructed and maintained residential dwellings in order to use random selection. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 1 to determine the number of residential dwellings to randomly select for testing.

(2) If the multifamily housing contains 5 or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use targeted selection. If using targeted selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than 5 similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested. Residential dwellings chosen by targeted selection shall meet as many of the following criteria as possible. If additional residential dwellings are needed to meet the minimum number specified in Table 2, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall select them randomly. If too many residential dwellings meet the criteria, residential dwellings shall be eliminated randomly. Targeted selection criteria are as follows:

1. The residential dwelling has been cited with a housing or building code violation within the past year.

2. The property owner believes that the residential dwelling is in poor condition.

3. The residential dwelling contains two or more children between the ages of six months and six years. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall give preference to residential dwellings that house the largest number of children.

4. The residential dwelling serves as a child-occupied facility.

5. The residential dwelling has been prepared for reoccupancy within the past three months.

(3) If the multifamily housing contains 5 or more similar residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may use worst case selection. If using worst case selection, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall use Table 2 to determine the number of residential dwellings to test. If the multifamily housing has fewer than 5 similar dwellings, all residential dwellings shall be tested.

(4) The following standards shall be used to determine the extent of lead-based paint hazards throughout multifamily housing that is sampled by random selection, targeted selection, or worst case selection:

1. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall calculate the arithmetic mean of the dust-lead levels for carpeted floors, uncarpeted floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs. If the arithmetic mean is greater than or equal to the level defined as a dust-lead hazard for the component, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall determine that a dust-lead hazard has been identified on the component throughout the multifamily housing. If the arithmetic mean is less than the level defined as a dust-lead hazard for the component, but some of the individual components have dust-lead levels that are greater than or equal to the level defined as a dust-lead hazard, then the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall determine that a dust-lead hazard has been identified on the individual components and on all other similar components throughout the multifamily housing.

2. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall evaluate the results of paint sampling by component and location. If all components at a given location are determined to be painted with lead-based paint or are determined not to be painted with lead-based paint, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor may assume this condition is true for all similar residential dwellings. The certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall not assume that the multifamily housing is free of lead-based paint. If a component at a given location is found to be painted with lead-based paint in some residential dwellings and not painted with lead-based paint in other residential dwellings, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall assume that the component is a lead-based paint hazard in all similar residential dwellings.

m. If reevaluation is conducted, the first reevaluation shall be conducted no later than two years from completion of lead abatement, interim controls, or standard treatments. Subsequent reevaluation shall be conducted at intervals of two years, plus or minus 60 days. To be exempt from additional reevaluation, a residential dwelling or child-occupied facility shall have at least two consecutive passing reevaluations conducted at such two-year intervals. If, however, a reevaluation fails, at least two more consecutive reevaluations conducted at such two-year intervals must be conducted.

n. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall prepare a written report for each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility where a reevaluation is conducted. No later than three weeks after the receipt of laboratory results, the certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall send a copy of the report to the property owner and to the person requesting the reevaluation, if different. A certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall maintain a copy of the report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) Date of each reevaluation;

(2) Address of building;

(3) Date of construction;

(4) Apartment numbers (if applicable);

(5) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner or owners of each residential dwelling or child-occupied facility;

(6) Name, signature, and certification number of each certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor conducting the reevaluation;

(7) Name and certification number of the certified firm(s) conducting the reevaluation;

(8) All of the information gathered for the review as outlined in 70.6(10)"a";

(9) Results of the visual inspection including details of any newly identified lead-based paint hazards, the status of past lead hazard control measures, and repair options for any lead-based paint hazards identified during the reevaluation;

(10) An indication of whether or not the property passed or failed the reevaluation;

(11) An indication of when the next reevaluation, if any, should occur;

(12) The results of any environmental samples taken, including all XRF readings, all laboratory analyses and clearance testing results, if necessary;

(13) Name, address, and telephone number of each recognized laboratory conducting an analysis of collected samples, including the identification number for each such laboratory recognized by EPA under Section 405(b) of the Toxic Substances Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2685(b));

(14) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745;

(15) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation found in 641-Chapter 70; and

(16) The report shall contain the following statement:

"The Iowa Department of Public Health may review this report for compliance purposes. It is a violation of law for anyone other than the certified lead professional signing it to alter this report. This report may be supplemented with additional information, so long as any addendum is signed by a sampling technician, lead inspector/risk assessor or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor certified according to Iowa Administrative Code 641-70.3(135) and 70.5(135)."

(11) All renovations performed in target housing and child-occupied facilities, except for emergency renovations and minor repair and maintenance activities, shall be performed according to the work practice standards in 70.6(11). Renovation activities conducted in housing or on surfaces determined to be free of lead-based paint by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor shall be exempt from all work practice standards except record keeping. All renovations shall be performed by a certified firm under the supervision of a certified lead abatement contractor or a certified lead abatement worker who completes initial certification on or after January 13, 2010, or if certified prior to January 13, 2010, completes a lead abatement worker, lead abatement contractor, or lead-safe renovator refresher course on or after January 13, 2010, or shall be performed by a certified lead-safe renovator in accordance with the requirements below.

a. A firm shall assign at least one certified lead abatement contractor, a certified lead abatement worker, or a certified lead-safe renovator to each individual renovation project. The certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator assigned to each individual renovation project shall ensure the following:

(1) A certified lead abatement contractor, a certified lead abatement worker, or a certified lead-safe renovator must be on site during all worksite preparation and during the cleanup of work areas. At all other times when renovation is being conducted, a certified lead abatement contractor, a certified lead abatement worker, or a certified lead-safe renovator shall be on site or available by telephone, pager, or answering service and be able to be present at the worksite in no more than two hours.

(2) Signs are posted and readable. All signs must be posted before the renovation begins and must remain in place until the postrenovation cleaning verification has been completed.

1. To the extent practicable, all signage must be posted in the occupants' primary language.

2. The signs must clearly define the work area.

3. The signs must warn occupants and other persons not involved with the renovation activity to remain outside the work area.

4. The signs must be posted at the entrance(s) to all work areas.

(3) The work area must be effectively contained before the renovation is begun. To be effective, containment must:

1. Isolate the work area so that no dust or debris leaves the work area while the renovation is being performed.

2. Be monitored and maintained so that any plastic or other impermeable materials are not torn or displaced.

3. Be installed in such a manner that it does not interfere with occupant and worker egress in an emergency.

(4) For interior renovations, containment shall include:

1. The removal or covering of all objects from the work area, including but not limited to furniture, rugs, and window coverings. Objects that are not removed from the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material with all seams and edges taped or otherwise sealed.

2. Closing and covering all duct openings in the work area. Ducts must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material that is taped down.

3. Closing windows and doors in the work area. Doors must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material. Doors used as an entrance to the work area must be covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass through while confining dust and debris to the work area.

4. Covering the floor surface, including installed carpet, with taped-down plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in the work area six feet beyond the perimeter of the surfaces undergoing renovation or a sufficient distance to contain the dust, whichever is greater.

5. Ensuring that all personnel, tools, and other items, including the exteriors of containers of waste, are free of dust and debris before leaving or being removed from the work area.

(5) For exterior renovations, containment shall include:

1. Closing all doors and windows within 20 feet of the renovation. On multistory buildings, all doors and windows within 20 feet of the renovation on the same story as the renovation shall be closed, and all doors and windows on all stories below the renovation that are the same horizontal distance from the renovation shall be closed.

2. Ensuring that doors within the work areas that will be used while the renovation is being performed are covered with plastic sheeting or other impermeable material in a manner that allows workers to pass through while confining dust and debris to the work area.

3. Covering the ground with plastic sheeting or other disposable impermeable material extending 10 feet beyond the perimeter of surfaces undergoing renovation or a sufficient distance to collect falling paint debris, whichever is greater, unless the property line prevents 10 feet of such ground cover. Exterior ground cover shall include anchors or weights to ensure the covering remains effective even during weather conditions such as high wind.

4. Vertical containment. In certain situations, such as where other buildings are in close proximity to the work area, when conditions are windy, or where the work area abuts a property line, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall erect a system of vertical containment designed to prevent dust and debris from migrating to adjacent property or contaminating the ground, other buildings, or any object beyond the work area.

(6) Prohibited practices are not used during the renovation. Prohibited practices include:

1. Open-flame burning or torching of paint.

2. Machine sanding or grinding or abrasive blasting or sandblasting of paint unless used with high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) exhaust control that removes particles of 0.3 microns or larger from the air at 99.97 percent or greater efficiency.

3. Uncontained water blasting of paint.

4. Dry scraping or dry sanding of paint except in conjunction with the use of a heat gun or around electrical outlets.

5. Operating a heat gun at a temperature at or above 1100 degrees Fahrenheit.

(7) All workers that are not certified lead abatement contractors, certified lead abatement workers, or certified lead-safe renovators must have on-the-job training as required by 70.6(11) "J. " However, on-the-job training does not meet the training requirement for work conducted pursuant to 24 CFR 35.1340.

(8) If desired, perform all testing with recognized test kits in accordance with 70.6(11)"e. "

(9) Perform the postrenovation cleaning verification as outlined in 70.6(11)"b. "

(10) All waste generated during renovation activities is contained to prevent the release of dust and debris before the waste is removed from the work area for storage or disposal. Any chutes used to remove waste from the work area shall be covered.

1. At the conclusion of each workday and at the conclusion of the renovation, waste that has been collected from renovation activities must be stored under containment, in an enclosure, or behind a barrier that prevents release of dust and debris out of the work area and prevents access to dust and debris.

2. All waste from renovation activities must be contained during transportation so that no dust or debris is released.

(11) The work area shall be cleaned so that no dust, debris, or residue remains after the renovation. Cleaning shall include:

1. The collection of all paint chips and debris and, without dispersing the paint chips and debris, the sealing of the materials in heavy-duty bags.

2. The removal of the protective sheeting used as required in this subrule. The sheeting shall be misted, then the sheeting shall be folded dirty side inward. All sheeting shall be taped shut or otherwise sealed inside heavy-duty bags. Sheeting used to separate work areas from non-work areas must remain in place until after the cleaning and removal of other sheeting. All sheeting shall be disposed of as waste.

3. For interior renovations, all objects and surfaces in the work area and within two feet of the work area must be cleaned from high to low in the following manner:

* Walls must either be vacuumed with a HEPA vacuum or wiped with a wet cloth, beginning at the ceiling and working toward the floor.

* All remaining surfaces including objects and fixtures must be thoroughly vacuumed with a HEPA vacuum. For carpeted floors and rugs, the HEPA vacuum must be equipped with a beater bar.

* All remaining surfaces, except for carpeted or upholstered surfaces, must also be wiped with a damp cloth. Uncarpeted floors must be thoroughly mopped using a method that keeps the wash water separate from the rinse water, such as the two-bucket mopping method, or using a wet mopping system.

b. Postrenovation cleaning verification. A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall use the following procedure for conducting postrenovation cleaning verification. In lieu of postrenovation cleaning verification, clearance testing as outlined in 70.6(8) can be performed. If the work is done in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, clearance testing shall be performed by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor in lieu of postrenovation cleaning verification. Warning signs may be removed after all of the work areas in a renovation project have been adequately cleaned and verified or passed clearance testing.

(1) For interior renovations, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall perform a visual inspection to determine whether dust, debris, or residue is still present. If dust, debris, or residue is still present, these conditions must be removed by recleaning, and another visual inspection must be performed. Following a successful visual inspection, a certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator must:

1. Verify that each windowsill and window trough in the work area has been adequately cleaned, using the following procedure:

* Wipe the windowsill and window trough with a wet disposable cleaning cloth that is damp to the touch. If the cloth matches or is lighter than the cleaning verification card, the windowsill has been adequately cleaned.

* If the cloth does not match and is darker than the cleaning verification card, reclean the windowsill or window trough as directed in 70.6(11) "a "(11). Then wipe the windowsill or window trough again, using a new cloth or the same cloth folded in such a way that an unused surface is exposed. If the cloth matches or is lighter than the cleaning verification card, that windowsill has been adequately cleaned.

* If the cloth does not match and is darker than the cleaning verification card, wait for one hour or until the surface has dried completely, whichever is longer.

* After waiting for the windowsill or window trough to dry, wipe the windowsill or window trough with a dry disposable cleaning cloth. After this wipe, that windowsill or window trough has been adequately cleaned.

2. Verify that uncarpeted floors and countertops in the work area have been adequately cleaned, using the following procedure. If the surface within the work area is greater than 40 square feet, the surface within the work area must be divided into roughly equal sections that are each less than 40 square feet.

* Wipe uncarpeted floors and countertops within the work area with a wet disposable cleaning cloth. Floors must be wiped using an application device with a long handle and a head to which the cloth is attached. The cloth must remain damp at all times while it is being used to wipe the surface for postrenovation cleaning verification. Wipe each such section separately with a new wet disposable cleaning cloth. If the cloth used to wipe each section of the surface within the work area matches or is lighter than the cleaning verification card, the surface has been adequately cleaned.

* If the cloth does not match and is darker than the cleaning verification card, reclean the surface as in 70.6(11)"a"(11). Then wipe the floor or counter top again, using a new cloth. If the cloth matches or is lighter than the cleaning verification card, that surface has been adequately cleaned.

* If the cloth does not match and is darker than the cleaning verification card, wait for one hour or until the surface has dried completely, whichever is longer.

* After waiting for the surface to dry, wipe each section of the surface that has not yet achieved the postrenovation cleaning verification with a dry disposable cleaning cloth. After this wipe, that surface has been adequately cleaned.

(2) For exterior renovations, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall perform a visual inspection to determine whether dust, debris, or residue is still present on surfaces in and below the work area, including windowsills and the ground. If dust, debris, or residue is present, these conditions must be eliminated and another visual inspection must be performed. When the area passes the visual inspection, the exterior has been adequately cleaned.

(3) A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall only use cleaning verification cards that are approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

(4) A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall not use cleaning verification cards that have expired.

c. Clearance testing. Postrenovation cleaning verification is not required if the contract between the renovation firm and the person contracting for the renovation or another federal, state, territorial, tribal, or local law or regulation requires the renovation firm to perform clearance testing at the conclusion of a renovation covered by this chapter.

(1) The dust samples must be collected by a certified lead inspector/risk assessor, certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor, or certified sampling technician. If the work is done in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection, the dust samples must be collected by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

(2) The firm conducting the renovation is required to reclean the work area until the dust clearance sample results are below the clearance standards in subrule 70.6(8).

d. On-the-job training. The certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator assigned to the renovation project shall ensure that each noncertified individual conducting renovation activities has been or is currently being trained on how to safely conduct renovation activities. However, on-the-job training does not meet the training requirement for work conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35.

(1) All on-the-job training shall be conducted by a certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator.

(2) Each noncertified individual shall be trained by a certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator who is employed by the same certified firm. A certified firm shall not accept on-the-job training that was performed by another firm. On-the-job training does not meet the requirement for work conducted pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35.

(3) On-the-job training shall be specific for the type of work the noncertified individual is performing and must include at least the following topics:

1. An overview of the requirements described in this chapter.

2. An overview of the health effects of lead poisoning.

3. Methods to prevent taking lead dust home from the worksite.

4. How and why to properly set up a work area for lead-safe renovations.

5. How and where to properly post signage.

6. Personal protection.

7. How and why to properly set up containment.

8. How and why to minimize dust and debris.

9. Proper cleaning techniques and time lines for cleaning in renovation activities.

10. How to properly handle and control waste generated from renovation activities.

11. An overview of the postrenovation cleaning verification and clearance testing.

12. An overview of the prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69.

13. Prohibited work practices.

e. Recognized test kits. A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator may use recognized test kits to determine whether surfaces to be affected by renovation activities are painted with lead-based paint. The result from each individual test performed applies only to the individual surface tested. Surfaces which are determined by proper use of a recognized test kit to be free of lead-based paint are exempt from the requirements of 70.6(11) "a" through"d." Results obtained from recognized test kits are only valid if the testing was performed according to the manufacturer's directions. Any results from test kits which are not recognized shall be invalid. A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall not discard a valid result from a recognized test kit.

f. A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator must complete a written report when conducting a renovation. The report shall include the results of any testing performed with a recognized test kit, information regarding the work practices used in the renovation and, if applicable, a copy of the clearance testing report. When the final invoice for the renovation is delivered or within 30 days after the renovation activity is complete, whichever is earlier, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall send a copy of the report to the owner of the building. If the renovation took place within a residential dwelling, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall send a copy of the report to an adult occupant of the residential dwelling and to the person requesting the renovation, if different from the owner. If the renovation took place within a child-occupied facility, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall send a copy of the report to an adult representative of the child-occupied facility and to the person requesting the renovation, if different from the owner. If the renovation took place within common areas of multifamily target housing, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall post in areas where it is likely to be seen by the occupants of all of the affected units the report required by this paragraph or instructions on how interested occupants can obtain a copy of this report at no charge. If the renovation took place within a child-occupied facility, the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall post in areas where it is likely to be seen by the parents or guardians of children frequenting the child-occupied facility the report required by this paragraph or instructions on how interested parents or guardians of children frequenting the child-occupied facility can obtain a copy of this report at no charge. A certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator shall maintain a copy of the report for no less than three years. The report shall include, at least:

(1) The date(s) of the renovation.

(2) Address of the building, including apartment numbers, if applicable.

(3) The name, address, and telephone number of the owner(s) of the address(es) where the renovation took place.

(4) The name, address, signature, certification number, and telephone number of the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator who performed the renovation.

(5) The name and certification number of the certified firm performing the renovation.

(6) If testing was performed with a recognized test kit, the location of each test. The location shall be specific to the room and component.

(7) The results of testing. The results shall be classified as either positive for lead-based paint or negative for lead-based paint.

(8) The name and manufacturer of the recognized test kit(s) used, the expiration date, and the EPA approval number.

(9) The work practices used in the renovation, including the location(s) where each work practice was used. The location shall be specific to the room and component.

(10) If applicable, a copy of the clearance report.

(11) Information regarding the owner's obligations to disclose known lead-based paint and lead-based paint hazards upon sale or lease of residential property as required by Subpart H of 24 CFR Part 35 and Subpart I of 40 CFR Part 745.

(12) Information regarding Iowa's prerenovation notification requirements found in 641-Chapter 69; and information regarding Iowa's regulations for renovation, remodeling and repainting found in 641-Chapter 70.

g. Record keeping. Records shall be kept for each renovation project that involves target housing or child-occupied facilities. The records for each renovation shall include:

(1) The name and certification number of the certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator responsible for the renovation.

(2) The name and certification number of the certified firm that performed the renovation.

(3) The address(es) of the property where the renovation activity was performed.

(4) The name, address, and telephone number of the property owner where the renovation activity was performed.

(5) Renovations considered emergency pursuant to 641-70.2 (135) shall contain a description of the circumstances explaining why the renovations were immediately required and which work practice standards were not followed as a result.

(6) Any reports or documentation completed by a certified lead professional concerning the renovation project, including documentation from certified lead inspector/risk assessors or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) lead inspector/risk assessors regarding housing, components, or surfaces that have been determined to be free of lead-based paint and clearance reports from clearance testing performed in lieu of postrenovation cleaning verification.

(7) Documentation that each noncertified individual working on the renovation project had, or was receiving, the appropriate on-the-job training outlined in 70.6(11)"d. " The documentation must include the names of all of the noncertified individuals who worked on the renovation. However, on-the-job training does not meet the training requirement for work conducted pursuant to 24 CFR 35.1340.

(8) Documentation that the certified lead-safe renovator followed the work practices for renovation activities outlined in 70.6(11). This shall include documentation that the following work practices were followed:

1. Signs were posted at the entrance to the work area.

2. The work area was contained.

3. All objects in the work area were covered or removed.

4. All HVAC ducts in the work area were closed and covered.

5. All windows in the work area were closed, and all windows within 20 feet of exterior work areas were closed.

6. All doors not used to enter the work area were closed and sealed, and all doors within 20 feet of exterior work areas were closed and sealed.

7. All doors used as an entrance to the work area had containment in place to prevent the spread of dust and debris.

8. All floors in the work area were covered for a sufficient distance to contain the dust and debris from the renovation.

9. Adequate ground cover was in place to contain the dust and debris for exterior renovations.

10. Adequate vertical containment was in place to contain the dust and debris for exterior renovations.

11. All waste generated during the renovations was contained throughout the renovation and the transportation to disposal.

(9) Documentation that the renovation work area was cleaned and passed the postrenovation cleaning verification procedures outlined in 70.6(11) "Z>, " including the expiration date of the cleaning verification cards used.

(10) Documentation regarding the use of any recognized test kits outlined in 70.6(11)"e." The documentation shall include a copy of the written report required by 70.6(11)"f."

h. Emergency renovations.

(1) Renovation activities that are deemed to be an emergency are exempt from the certification requirements and all of the work practice standards, except for the cleaning requirements, postrenovation cleaning verification, and the written report required by 70.6(11)"f. " All postrenovation cleaning must take place under the direction of a certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator. The postrenovation cleaning verification after an emergency renovation must be performed by a certified lead abatement contractor, certified lead abatement worker, or certified lead-safe renovator.

(2) Emergency renovations that are required as a result of an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection are initially exempt from the certification requirements. The work practice standards found in 70.6(11)"a" shall apply. All individuals who perform emergency renovations in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection are required to obtain certification as a lead-safe renovator, lead abatement contractor, or lead abatement worker within six months from the date the elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection report was issued. Renovations and interim controls performed in response to an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspection are required to pass clearance testing that is performed by a certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor.

(12) Rescinded IAB 2/12/20, effective 3/18/20.

(13) A person may be certified as a lead inspector/risk assessor, sampling technician, or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor and as a lead abatement contractor or lead abatement worker. Except as specified by paragraph 70.6(6)"k" and paragraph 70.6(8)"f," a person who is certified both as a lead inspector/risk assessor, sampling technician, or elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor and as a lead abatement contractor or lead abatement worker shall not provide both lead inspection or visual risk assessment and lead abatement services at the same site unless a written consent or waiver, following full disclosure by the person, is obtained from the owner or manager of the site.

(14) Any paint chip, dust, or soil samples collected pursuant to the work practice standards contained in subrules 70.6(1) to 70.6(6) and 70.6(9) shall be collected by persons certified as a lead inspector/risk assessor or an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. Any paint chip, dust, or soil samples collected pursuant to the work practice standards contained in subrule 70.6(8) for clearance testing following lead abatement shall be collected by persons certified as a lead inspector/risk assessor or an elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessor. Any dust or soil samples collected pursuant to the work practice standards contained in subrule 70.6(8) for clearance testing after renovation or interim controls, paint stabilization, standard treatments, ongoing lead-based paint maintenance, and rehabilitation pursuant to 24 CFR Part 35 shall be collected only by certified sampling technicians, certified lead inspector/risk assessors, or certified elevated blood lead (EBL) inspector/risk assessors. Any paint chip, dust, or soil samples collected pursuant to the work practice standards contained in 641-70.6 (135) shall be analyzed by a recognized laboratory.

(15) Composite dust sampling shall be conducted only in the situations specified in subrules 70.6(4) to 70.6(6) and 70.6(8). If composite sampling is conducted, it shall meet the following requirements:

a. Composite dust samples shall consist of at least two subsamples.

b. Every component that is being tested shall be included in the sampling.

c. Composite dust samples shall not consist of subsamples from more than one type of component.

d. The results of composite dust samples shall be evaluated by comparing the residual lead level as determined by the laboratory analysis from each composite dust sample with applicable single-surface dust-lead hazard or clearance levels for lead in dust on floors, interior windowsills, and window troughs divided by half the number of subsamples in the composite sample. For example, the applicable clearance level for a composite window trough sample consisting of three subsamples would be 267 micrograms per square foot (400/1.5).

(16) Rescinded IAB 6/7/17, effective 7/12/17.

(ARC 8502B, IAB 2/10/10, effective 1/2013/10 Amended by IAB June 7, 2017/Volume XXXIX, Number 25, effective 7/12/2017 Amended by IAB February 12, 2020/Volume XLII, Number 17, effective 3/18/2020)

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