36 U.S. Code Chapter 1 - PATRIOTIC AND NATIONAL OBSERVANCES

Amendments

2004—Pub. L. 108–447, div. J, title I, § 111(c)(2), Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3345, inserted “Constitution Day and” before “Citizenship Day” in item 106.

2001—Pub. L. 107–89, § 2, Dec. 18, 2001, 115 Stat. 877, added item 144.

John F. Kennedy Centennial Commission

Pub. L. 114–215, July 29, 2016, 130 Stat. 830, provided that:

“SECTION 1.
SHORT TITLE.

“This Act may be cited as the ‘John F. Kennedy Centennial Commission Act’.

“SEC. 2.
ESTABLISHMENT.

“There is established a commission to be known as the ‘John F. Kennedy Centennial Commission’ (in this Act referred to as the ‘Commission’).

“SEC. 3.
DUTIES OF COMMISSION.
“The Commission shall—
“(1)
plan, develop, and carry out such activities as the Commission considers fitting and proper to honor John F. Kennedy on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth;
“(2)
provide advice and assistance to Federal, State, and local governmental agencies, as well as civic groups to carry out activities to honor John F. Kennedy on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth;
“(3)
develop activities that may be carried out by the Federal Government that are fitting and proper to honor John F. Kennedy on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth; and
“(4)
submit to the President and Congress reports pursuant to section 7.
“SEC. 4.
MEMBERSHIP.
“(a)Number and Appointment.—The Commission shall be composed of 11 members as follows:
“(1)
The Secretary of the Interior.
“(2)
Four members appointed by the President after considering the recommendations of the Board of Trustees of the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation.
“(3)
Two Members of the House of Representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
“(4)
One Member of the House of Representatives appointed by the minority leader of the House of Representatives.
“(5)
Two Members of the Senate appointed by the majority leader of the Senate.
“(6)
One Member of the Senate appointed by the minority leader of the Senate.
“(b)Ex Officio Member.—
The Archivist of the United States shall serve in an ex officio capacity on the Commission to provide advice and information to the Commission.
“(c)Terms.—
Each member shall be appointed for the life of the Commission.
“(d)Deadline for Appointment.—
All members of the Commission shall be appointed not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [July 29, 2016].
“(e)Vacancies.—A vacancy on the Commission shall—
“(1)
not affect the powers of the Commission; and
“(2)
be filled in the manner in which the original appointment was made.
“(f)Rates of Pay.—
Members shall not receive compensation for the performance of their duties on behalf of the Commission.
“(g)Travel Expenses.—
Each member of the Commission shall be reimbursed for travel and per diem in lieu of subsistence expenses during the performance of duties of the Commission while away from home or his or her regular place of business, in accordance with applicable provisions under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, United States Code.
“(h)Quorum.—
A majority of the members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum to conduct business, but two or more members may hold hearings.
“(i)Chairperson.—
The chairperson of the Commission shall be elected by a majority vote of the members of the Commission.
“SEC. 5.
DIRECTOR AND STAFF OF COMMISSION.
“(a)Director and Staff.—
The Commission shall appoint an executive director and such other additional employees as are necessary to enable the Commission to perform its duties.
“(b)Applicability of Certain Civil Service Laws.—
The executive director and employees of the Commission may be appointed without regard to the provisions of title 5, United States Code, governing appointments in the competitive service, and may be paid without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title relating to classification and General Schedule pay rates, except that the rate of pay for the executive director and other employees may not exceed the rate payable for level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of such title.
“(c)Detail of Federal Employees.—
Upon request of the Commission, the Secretary of the Interior or the Archivist of the United States may detail, on a reimbursable basis, any of the employees of that department or agency to the Commission to assist it in carrying out its duties under this Act.
“(d)Experts and Consultants.—
The Commission may procure such temporary and intermittent services as are necessary to enable the Commission to perform its duties.
“(e)Volunteer and Uncompensated Services.—
Notwithstanding section 1342 of title 31, United States Code, the Commission may accept and use voluntary and uncompensated services as the Commission determines necessary.
“SEC. 6.
POWERS OF COMMISSION.
“(a)Hearings.—
The Commission may, for the purpose of carrying out this Act, hold hearings, sit and act at times and places, take testimony, and receive evidence as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(b)Mails.—
The Commission may use the United States mails in the same manner and under the same conditions as other departments and agencies of the United States.
“(c)Obtaining Official Data.—
The Commission may secure directly from any department or agency of the United States information necessary to enable it to carry out its duties under this Act. Upon request of the chairperson of the Commission, the head of that department or agency shall furnish that information to the Commission.
“(d)Gifts, Bequests, Devises.—
The Commission may solicit, accept, use, and dispose of gifts, bequests, or devises of money, services, or property, both real and personal, for the purpose of aiding or facilitating its work.
“(e)Available Space.—
Upon the request of the Commission, the Administrator of General Services shall make available nationwide to the Commission, at a normal rental rate for Federal agencies, such assistance and facilities as may be necessary for the Commission to carry out its duties under this Act.
“(f)Contract Authority.—
The Commission may enter into contracts with and compensate government and private agencies or persons to enable the Commission to discharge its duties under this Act.
“SEC. 7.
REPORTS.
“(a)Annual Reports.—
The Commission shall submit to the President and the Congress annual reports on the revenue and expenditures of the Commission, including a list of each gift, bequest, or devise to the Commission with a value of more than $250, together with the identity of the donor of each gift, bequest, or devise.
“(b)Interim Reports.—
The Commission may submit to the President and Congress interim reports as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(c)Final Report.—Not later than August 31, 2017, the Commission shall submit a final report to the President and the Congress containing—
“(1)
a summary of the activities of the Commission;
“(2)
a final accounting of funds received and expended by the Commission; and
“(3)
the findings, conclusions, and final recommendations of the Commission.
“SEC. 8.
TERMINATION.

“The Commission may terminate on such date as the Commission may determine after it submits its final report pursuant to section 7(c), but not later than September 30, 2017.

“SEC. 9.
ANNUAL AUDIT.

“The Inspector General of the Department of the Interior may perform an audit of the Commission, shall make the results of any audit performed available to the public, and shall transmit such results to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate.

“SEC. 10.
PROHIBITION ON OBLIGATION OF FEDERAL FUNDS.

“No Federal funds may be obligated to carry out this Act.”

United States Semiquincentennial Commission

Pub. L. 114–196, July 22, 2016, 130 Stat. 685, provided that:

“SECTION 1.
SHORT TITLE.

“This Act may be cited as the ‘United States Semiquincentennial Commission Act of 2016’.

“SEC. 2.
FINDINGS; PURPOSE.
“(a)Findings.—Congress finds that July 4, 2026, the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States, as marked by the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and the historic events preceding that anniversary—
“(1)
are of major significance in the development of the national heritage of the United States of individual liberty, representative government, and the attainment of equal and inalienable rights; and
“(2)
have had a profound influence throughout the world.
“(b)Purpose.—
The purpose of this Act is to establish a Commission to provide for the observance and commemoration of the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States and related events through local, State, national, and international activities planned, encouraged, developed, and coordinated by a national commission representative of appropriate public and private authorities and organizations.
“SEC. 3.
DEFINITIONS.
“In this Act:
“(1)Commission.—
The term ‘Commission’ means the United States Semiquincentennial Commission established by section 4(a).
“(2)Private citizen.—The term ‘private citizen’ means an individual who is not an officer or employee of—
“(A)
the Federal Government; or
“(B)
a State or local government.
“(3)Secretary.—
The term ‘Secretary’ means the Secretary of the Interior.
“SEC. 4.
ESTABLISHMENT OF COMMISSION.
“(a)In General.—
There is established a commission, to be known as the ‘United States Semiquincentennial Commission’, to plan, encourage, develop, and coordinate the commemoration of the history of the United States leading up to the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States.
“(b)Composition.—The Commission shall be composed of the following members:
“(1) Four members of the Senate, of whom—
“(A)
two shall be appointed by the majority leader of the Senate; and
“(B)
two shall be appointed by the minority leader of the Senate.
“(2) Four members of the House of Representatives, of whom—
“(A)
two shall be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives; and
“(B)
two shall be appointed by the minority leader of the House of Representatives.
“(3) Sixteen members who are private citizens, of whom—
“(A)
four shall be appointed by the majority leader of the Senate;
“(B)
four shall be appointed by the minority leader of the Senate;
“(C)
four shall be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives;
“(D)
four shall be appointed by the minority leader of the House of Representatives; and
“(E)
one of whom shall be designated by the President as the Chairperson.
“(4) The following nonvoting ex officio members:
“(A)
The Secretary.
“(B)
The Secretary of State.
“(C)
The Attorney General.
“(D)
The Secretary of Defense.
“(E)
The Secretary of Education.
“(F)
The Librarian of Congress.
“(G)
The Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.
“(H)
The Archivist of the United States.
“(I)
The presiding officer of the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.
“(c) Term; Vacancies.—
“(1)Term.—
A member shall be appointed for the life of the Commission.
“(2)Vacancies.—A vacancy on the Commission—
“(A)
shall not affect the powers of the Commission; and
“(B)
shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment was made.
“(d)Meetings.—
All meetings of the Commission shall be convened at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to honor the historical significance of the building as the site of deliberations and adoption of both the United States Declaration of Independence and Constitution.
“(e)Quorum.—
A majority of the members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum, but a lesser number of members may hold hearings.
“SEC. 5.
DUTIES.
“(a)In General.—The Commission shall—
“(1)
prepare an overall program for commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States and the historic events preceding that anniversary; and
“(2)
plan, encourage, develop, and coordinate observances and activities commemorating the historic events that preceded, and are associated with, the United States Semiquincentennial.
“(b) Requirements.—
“(1)In general.—In preparing plans and an overall program, the Commission—
“(A)
shall give due consideration to any related plans and programs developed by State, local, and private groups; and
“(B)
may designate special committees with representatives from groups described in subparagraph (A) to plan, develop, and coordinate specific activities.
“(2)Emphasis.—The Commission shall—
“(A) emphasize the planning of events in locations of historical significance to the United States, especially in those locations that witnessed the assertion of American liberty, such as—
“(i)
the 13 colonies; and
“(ii)
leading cities, including Boston, Charleston, New York City, and Philadelphia; and
“(B) give special emphasis to—
“(i)
the role of persons and locations with significant impact on the history of the United States during the 250-year period beginning on the date of execution of the Declaration of Independence; and
“(ii)
the ideas associated with that history, which have been so important in the development of the United States, in world affairs, and in the quest for freedom of all mankind.
“(3)Infrastructure.—The Commission shall—
“(A)
evaluate existing infrastructure;
“(B)
include in the report required under subsection (c) recommendations for what infrastructure should be in place for the successful undertaking of an appropriate celebration in accordance with this Act; and
“(C)
coordinate with State and local bodies to make necessary infrastructure improvements.
“(c) Report Submitted to the President.—
“(1)In general.—
Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act [July 22, 2016], the Commission shall submit to the President a comprehensive report that includes the specific recommendations of the Commission for the commemoration of the 250th anniversary and related events.
“(2)Recommended activities.—The report may include recommended activities such as—
“(A)
the production, publication, and distribution of books, pamphlets, films, and other educational materials focusing on the history, culture, and political thought of the period of the American Revolution;
“(B)
bibliographical and documentary projects and publications;
“(C)
conferences, convocations, lectures, seminars, and other programs, especially those located in the 13 colonies, including the major cities and buildings of national historical significance of the 13 colonies;
“(D)
the development of libraries, museums, historic sites, and exhibits, including mobile exhibits;
“(E) ceremonies and celebrations commemorating specific events, such as—
“(i)
the signing of the Declaration of Independence;
“(ii)
programs and activities focusing on the national and international significance of the United States Semiquincentennial; and
“(iii)
the implications of the Semiquincentennial for present and future generations; and
“(F)
encouraging Federal agencies to integrate the celebration of the Semiquincentennial into the regular activities and execution of the purpose of the agencies through such activities as the issuance of coins, medals, certificates of recognition, stamps, and the naming of vessels.
“(3)Requirements.—The report shall include—
“(A)
the recommendations of the Commission for the allocation of financial and administrative responsibility among the public and private authorities and organizations recommended for participation by the Commission; and
“(B)
proposals for such legislative enactments and administrative actions as the Commission considers necessary to carry out the recommendations.
“(d)Report Submitted to Congress.—The President shall submit to Congress a report that contains—
“(1)
the complete report of the Commission; and
“(2)
such comments and recommendations for legislation and such a description of administrative actions taken by the President as the President considers appropriate.
“(e)Point of Contact.—
The Commission, acting through the secretariat of the Commission described in section 9(b), shall serve as the point of contact of the Federal Government for all State, local, international, and private sector initiatives regarding the Semiquincentennial of the founding of the United States, with the purpose of coordinating and facilitating all fitting and proper activities honoring the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States.
“SEC. 6.
COORDINATION.
“(a)In General.—
In carrying out this Act, the Commission shall consult and cooperate with, and seek advice and assistance from, appropriate Federal agencies, State and local public bodies, learned societies, and historical, patriotic, philanthropic, civic, professional, and related organizations.
“(b) Responsibility of Other Federal Agencies.—
“(1)In general.—
Federal agencies shall cooperate with the Commission in planning, encouraging, developing, and coordinating appropriate commemorative activities.
“(2) Department of the interior.—
“(A)In general.—
The Secretary shall undertake a study of appropriate actions that might be taken to further preserve and develop historic sites and battlefields, at such time and in such manner as will ensure that fitting observances and exhibits may be held at appropriate sites and battlefields during the 250th anniversary celebration.
“(B)Report.—The Secretary shall submit to the Commission a report that contains the results of the study and the recommendations of the Secretary, in time to afford the Commission an opportunity—
“(i)
to review the study; and
“(ii)
to incorporate in the report described in section 5(c) such findings and recommendations as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(3) Arts and humanities.—
“(A)In general.—
The presiding officer of the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities, the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Humanities shall cooperate with the Commission, especially in the encouragement and coordination of scholarly works and artistic expressions focusing on the history, culture, and political thought of the period predating the United States Semiquincentennial.
“(B) Library of congress, smithsonian institution, and archives.—
“(i)In general.—
The Librarian of Congress, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, and the Archivist of the United States shall cooperate with the Commission, especially in the development and display of exhibits and collections and in the development of bibliographies, catalogs, and other materials relevant to the period predating the United States Semiquincentennial.
“(ii)Location.—
To the maximum extent practicable, displays described in subparagraph (A) shall be located in, or in facilities near to, buildings of historical significance to the American Revolution, so as to promote greater public awareness of the heritage of the United States.
“(C)Submission of recommendations.—Each of the officers described in this paragraph shall submit to the Commission a report containing recommendations in time to afford the Commission an opportunity—
“(i)
to review the reports; and
“(ii)
to incorporate in the report described in section 5(c) such findings and recommendations as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(4)Department of state.—The Secretary of State shall coordinate the participation of foreign nations in the celebration of the United States Semiquincentennial, including by soliciting the erection of monuments and other cultural cooperations in founding cities of the United States so as—
“(A)
to celebrate the shared heritage of the United States with the many peoples and nations of the world; and
“(B)
to provide liaison and encouragement for the erection of international pavilions to showcase the spread of democratic institutions abroad in the period following the American Revolution.
“SEC. 7.
POWERS.
“(a)Hearings.—
The Commission may hold such hearings, meet and act at such times and places, take such testimony, and receive such evidence as the Commission considers advisable to carry out this Act.
“(b) Information From Federal Agencies.—
“(1)In general.—
The Commission may secure directly from a Federal agency such information as the Commission considers necessary to carry out this Act.
“(2)Provision of information.—
On request of the Chairperson of the Commission, the head of the agency shall provide the information to the Commission.
“(c)Postal Services.—
The Commission may use the United States mails in the same manner and under the same conditions as other agencies of the Federal Government.
“(d)Gifts.—
The Commission may accept, use, and dispose of gifts or donations of money, property, or personal services.
“(e)Additional Powers.—As determined necessary by the Commission, the Commission may—
“(1)
procure supplies, services, and property;
“(2)
make contracts;
“(3)
expend in furtherance of this Act funds donated or received in pursuance of contracts entered into under this Act; and
“(4)
take such actions as are necessary to enable the Commission to carry out efficiently and in the public interest the purposes of this Act.
“(f) Use of Materials.—
“(1)Time capsule.—A representative portion of all books, manuscripts, miscellaneous printed matter, memorabilia, relics, and other materials relating to the United States Semiquincentennial shall be deposited in a time capsule—
“(A)
to be buried in Independence Mall, Philadelphia, on July 4, 2026; and
“(B)
to be unearthed on the occasion of the 500th anniversary of the United States of America on July 4, 2276.
“(2)Other materials.—
All other books, manuscripts, miscellaneous printed matter, memorabilia, relics, and other materials relating to the United States Semiquincentennial, whether donated to the Commission or collected by the Commission, may be deposited for preservation in national, State, or local libraries or museums or be otherwise disposed of by the Commission, in consultation with the Librarian of Congress, the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, the Archivist of the United States, and the Administrator of General Services.
“(g)Property.—Any property acquired by the Commission remaining on termination of the Commission may be—
“(1)
used by the Secretary for purposes of the National Park Service; or
“(2)
disposed of as excess or surplus property.
“SEC. 8.
COMMISSION PERSONNEL MATTERS.
“(a)Compensation of Members.—
The members of the Commission shall receive no compensation for service on the Commission.
“(b)Travel Expenses.—
A member of the Commission shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, at rates authorized for an employee of an agency under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, United States Code, while away from the home or regular place of business of the member in the performance of the duties of the Commission.
“(c) Staff.—
“(1)In general.—
The Chairperson of the Commission may, without regard to the civil service laws (including regulations), appoint and terminate an executive director and such other additional personnel as are necessary to enable the Commission to perform the duties of the Commission.
“(2)Confirmation of executive director.—
The employment of an executive director shall be subject to confirmation by the Commission.
“(3) Compensation.—
“(A)In general.—
Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the Chairperson of the Commission may fix the compensation of the executive director and other personnel without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code, relating to classification of positions and General Schedule pay rates.
“(B)Maximum rate of pay.—
The rate of pay for the executive director and other personnel shall not exceed the rate payable for level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United States Code.
“(d) Detail of Federal Government Employees.—
“(1)In general.—
An employee of the Federal Government may be detailed to the Commission without reimbursement.
“(2)Civil service status.—
The detail of the employee shall be without interruption or loss of civil service status or privilege.
“(e)Procurement of Temporary and Intermittent Services.—
The Chairperson of the Commission may procure temporary and intermittent services in accordance with section 3109(b) of title 5, United States Code, at rates for individuals that do not exceed the daily equivalent of the annual rate of basic pay prescribed for level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of that title.
“(f)Advisory Committees.—
The Commission may appoint such advisory committees as the Commission determines necessary.
“SEC. 9.
EXPENDITURES OF COMMISSION.
“(a)In General.—
All expenditures of the Commission shall be made solely from donated funds.
“(b)Administrative Secretariat.—The Secretary of the Interior shall, through a competitive process, seek to enter into an arrangement with a nonprofit organization, the mission of which is consistent with the purpose of this Act. Under such arrangement, such nonprofit organization shall—
“(1)
serve as the secretariat of the Commission, including by serving as the point of contact under section 5(e);
“(2)
house the administrative offices of the Commission;
“(3)
assume responsibility for funds of the Commission; and
“(4)
provide to the Commission financial and administrative services, including services related to budgeting, accounting, financial reporting, personnel, and procurement.
“(c) Payment for Financial and Administrative Services.—
“(1)In general.—
Subject to paragraph (2), payment for services provided under subsection (b)(4) shall be made in advance, or by reimbursement, from funds of the Commission in such amounts as may be agreed on by the Chairperson of the Commission and the secretariat of the Commission.
“(2) Relationship to regulations.—
“(A)Erroneous payments.—
The regulations under section 5514 of title 5, United States Code, relating to the collection of indebtedness of personnel resulting from erroneous payments shall apply to the collection of erroneous payments made to, or on behalf of, a Commission employee.
“(B)No promulgation by commission.—
The Commission shall not be required to prescribe any regulations relating to the matters described in subparagraph (A).
“(d)Annual Report.—
Once each year during the period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act [July 22, 2016] and ending on December 31, 2027, the Commission shall submit to Congress a report of the activities of the Commission, including an accounting of funds received and expended during the year covered by the report.
“SEC. 10.
TERMINATION OF COMMISSION.

“The Commission shall terminate on December 31, 2027.”

World War I Centennial

Pub. L. 113–291, div. B, title XXX, § 3091(a)–(c)(3)(B), Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3858–3860, provided that:

“(a) Liberty Memorial as World War I Museum and Memorial.—
“(1)Designation of liberty memorial.—
The Liberty Memorial of Kansas City at America’s National World War I Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, is hereby designated as a ‘World War I Museum and Memorial’.
“(2)Ceremonies.—
The World War I Centennial Commission (in this section referred to as the ‘Commission’) may plan, develop, and execute ceremonies to recognize the designation of the Liberty Memorial of Kansas City as a World War I Museum and Memorial.
“(b) Pershing Park as World War I Memorial.—
“(1)Redesignation of pershing park.—
Pershing Park in the District of Columbia is hereby redesignated as a ‘World War I Memorial’.
“(2)Ceremonies.—
The Commission may plan, develop, and execute ceremonies for the rededication of Pershing Park, as it approaches its 50th anniversary, as a World War I Memorial and for the enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work as authorized by paragraph (3).
“(3) Authority to enhance commemorative work.—
“(A)In general.—
The Commission may enhance the General Pershing Commemorative Work by constructing on the land designated by paragraph (1) as a World War I Memorial appropriate sculptural and other commemorative elements, including landscaping, to further honor the service of members of the United States Armed Forces in World War I.
“(B)General pershing commemorative work defined.—
In this subsection, the term ‘General Pershing Commemorative Work’ means the memorial to the late John J. Pershing, General of the Armies of the United States, who commanded the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, and to the officers and men under his command, as authorized by Public Law 89–786 (80 Stat. 1377).
“(4) Compliance with standards for commemorative works.—
“(A)In general.—
Except as provided in subparagraph (B), chapter 89 of title 40, United States Code, applies to the enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work under this subsection.
“(B) Waiver of certain requirements.—
“(i)Site selection for memorial.—
Section 8905 of such title does not apply with respect to the selection of the site for the World War I Memorial.
“(ii)Certain conditions.—
Section 8908(b) of such title does not apply to this subsection.
“(5)No infringement upon existing memorial.—
The World War I Memorial designated by paragraph (1) may not interfere with or encroach on the District of Columbia War Memorial.
“(6) Deposit of excess funds.—
“(A)Use for other world war i commemorative activities.—
If, upon payment of all expenses for the enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work under this subsection (including the maintenance and preservation amount required by section 8906(b)(1) of title 40, United States Code), there remains a balance of funds received for such purpose, the Commission may use the amount of the balance for other commemorative activities authorized under the World War I Centennial Commission Act (Public Law 112–272; 126 Stat. 2448) [set out below].
“(B)Use for other commemorative works.—
If the authority for enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work and the authority of the Commission to plan and conduct commemorative activities under the World War I Centennial Commission Act have expired and there remains a balance of funds received for the enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work, the Commission shall transmit the amount of the balance to a separate account with the National Park Foundation, to be available to the Secretary of the Interior following the process provided in section 8906(b)(4) of title 40, United States Code, for accounts established under section 8906(b)(3) of such title, except that funds in such account may only be obligated subject to appropriation.
“(7)Authorization to complete construction after termination of commission.—
[Amended section 8 of Pub. L. 112–272, set out below.]
“(c)Additional Amendments to World War I Centennial Commission Act.—
[Pars. (1) to (3)(B) amended sections 4, 7, and 9 of Pub. L. 112–272, set out below. Par. (3)(C) amended table of contents of Pub. L. 112–272, which was omitted from the Code.]”

Pub. L. 112–272, Jan. 14, 2013, 126 Stat. 2448, as amended by Pub. L. 113–291, div. B, title XXX, § 3091(b)(7)–(c)(3)(B), Dec. 19, 2014, 128 Stat. 3859, 3860, provided that:

“SECTION 1.
SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.
“(a)Short Title.—
This Act may be cited as the ‘World War I Centennial Commission Act’.
“(b)Table of Contents.—
[Omitted.]
“SEC. 2.
FINDINGS.
“Congress makes the following findings:
“(1)
From 2014 through 2018, the United States and nations around the world will mark the centennial of World War I, including the entry of the United States into the war in April 1917.
“(2)
America’s support of Great Britain, France, Belgium, and its other allies in World War I marked the first time in United States history that American soldiers went abroad in defense of liberty against foreign aggression, and it marked the true beginning of the ‘American century’.
“(3)
Although World War I was at the time called ‘the war to end all wars’, in fact the United States would commit its troops to the defense of foreign lands 3 more times in the 20th century.
“(4)
More than 4,000,000 men and women from the United States served in uniform during World War I, among them 2 future presidents, Harry S. Truman and Dwight D. Eisenhower. Two million individuals from the United States served overseas during World War I, including 200,000 naval personnel who served on the seas. The United States suffered 375,000 casualties during World War I, including 116,516 deaths.
“(5)
The events of 1914 through 1918 shaped the world, the United States, and the lives of millions of people.
“(6)
The centennial of World War I offers an opportunity for people in the United States to learn about and commemorate the sacrifices of their predecessors.
“(7)
Commemorative programs, activities, and sites allow people in the United States to learn about the history of World War I, the United States involvement in that war, and the war’s effects on the remainder of the 20th century, and to commemorate and honor the participation of the United States and its citizens in the war effort.
“SEC. 3.
DEFINITIONS.
“In this Act—
“(1)America’s national world war i museum.—
The term ‘America’s National World War I Museum’ means the Liberty Memorial Museum in Kansas City, Missouri, as recognized by Congress in section 1031(b) of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108–375; 118 Stat. 2045).
“(2)Centennial commission.—
The term ‘Centennial Commission’ means the World War I Centennial Commission established by section 4(a).
“(3)Veterans service organization.—
The term ‘veterans service organization’ means any organization recognized by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs for the representation of veterans under section 5902 of title 38, United States Code.
“SEC. 4.
ESTABLISHMENT OF WORLD WAR I CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.
“(a)Establishment.—
There is established a commission to be known as the ‘World War I Centennial Commission’.
“(b) Membership.—
“(1)Composition.—The Centennial Commission shall be composed of 12 members as follows:
“(A)
Two members who shall be appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
“(B)
One member who shall be appointed by the minority leader of the House of Representatives.
“(C)
Two members who shall be appointed by the majority leader of the Senate.
“(D)
One member who shall be appointed by the minority leader of the Senate.
“(E)
Three members who shall be appointed by the President from among persons who are broadly representative of the people of the United States (including members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and representatives of veterans service organizations).
“(F)
One member who shall be appointed by the executive director of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the United States.
“(G)
One member who shall be appointed by the executive director of the American Legion.
“(H)
One member who shall be appointed by the president of the Liberty Memorial Association.
“(2)Time for appointment.—
The members of the Centennial Commission shall be appointed not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [Jan. 14, 2013].
“(3)Period of appointment.—
Each member shall be appointed for the life of the Centennial Commission.
“(4)Vacancies.—
A vacancy in the Centennial Commission shall be filled in the manner in which the original appointment was made.
“(c) Meetings.—
“(1) Initial meeting.—
“(A)In general.—
Not later than 30 days after the date on which all members of the Centennial Commission have been appointed, the Centennial Commission shall hold its first meeting.
“(B)Location.—
The location for the meeting held under subparagraph (A) shall be the America’s National World War I Museum.
“(2) Subsequent meetings.—
“(A)In general.—
The Centennial Commission shall meet at the call of the Chair.
“(B)Frequency.—
The Chair shall call a meeting of the members of the Centennial Commission not less frequently than once each year.
“(C)Location.—
Not less frequently than once each year, the Centennial Commission shall meet at the America’s National World War I Museum.
“(3)Quorum.—
Seven members of the Centennial Commission shall constitute a quorum, but a lesser number may hold hearings.
“(d)Chair and Vice Chair.—
The Centennial Commission shall select a Chair and Vice Chair from among its members.
“(e) Ex Officio and Other Advisory Members.—
“(1)Powers.—
The individuals listed in paragraphs (2) and (3), or their designated representative, shall serve on the Centennial Commission solely to provide advice and information to the members of the Centennial Commission appointed pursuant to subsection (b)(1), and shall not be considered members for purposes of any other provision of this Act.
“(2)Ex officio members.—The following individuals shall serve as ex officio members:
“(A)
The Archivist of the United States.
“(B)
The Librarian of Congress.
“(C)
The Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.
“(D)
The Secretary of Education.
“(E)
The Secretary of State.
“(F)
The Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
“(G)
The Administrator of General Services.
“(3)Other advisory members.—The following individuals shall serve as other advisory members:
“(A)
Four members appointed by the Secretary of Defense in the following manner: One from the Navy, one from the Marine Corps, one from the Army, and one from the Air Force.
“(B)
Two members appointed by the Secretary of Homeland Security in the following manner: One from the Coast Guard and one from the United States Secret Service.
“(C)
Two members appointed by the Secretary of the Interior, including one from the National Parks Service.
“(4)Vacancies.—
A vacancy in a member position under paragraph (3) shall be filled in the same manner in which the original appointment was made.
“SEC. 5.
DUTIES OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.
“(a)In General.—The duties of the Centennial Commission are as follows:
“(1)
To plan, develop, and execute programs, projects, and activities to commemorate the centennial of World War I.
“(2)
To encourage private organizations and State and local governments to organize and participate in activities commemorating the centennial of World War I.
“(3)
To facilitate and coordinate activities throughout the United States relating to the centennial of World War I.
“(4)
To serve as a clearinghouse for the collection and dissemination of information about events and plans for the centennial of World War I.
“(5)
To develop recommendations for Congress and the President for commemorating the centennial of World War I.
“(b) Reports.—
“(1)Periodic report.—
Not later than the last day of the 6-month period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act [Jan. 14, 2013], and not later than the last day of each 3-month period thereafter, the Centennial Commission shall submit to Congress and the President a report on the activities and plans of the Centennial Commission.
“(2)Recommendations.—
Not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Centennial Commission shall submit to Congress and the President a report containing specific recommendations for commemorating the centennial of World War I and coordinating related activities.
“SEC. 6.
POWERS OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.
“(a)Hearings.—
The Centennial Commission may hold such hearings, sit and act at such times and places, take such testimony, and receive such evidence as the Centennial Commission considers appropriate to carry out its duties under this Act.
“(b)Powers of Member and Agents.—
If authorized by the Centennial Commission, any member or agent of the Centennial Commission may take any action which the Centennial Commission is authorized to take under this Act.
“(c)Information From Federal Agencies.—
The Centennial Commission shall secure directly from any Federal department or agency such information as the Centennial Commission considers necessary to carry out the provisions of this Act. Upon the request of the Chair of the Centennial Commission, the head of such department or agency shall furnish such information to the Centennial Commission.
“(d)Administrative Support Services.—
Upon the request of the Centennial Commission, the Administrator of the General Services Administration shall provide to the Centennial Commission, on a reimbursable basis, the administrative support services necessary for the Centennial Commission to carry out its responsibilities under this Act.
“(e) Contract Authority.—
“(1)In general.—Except as provided in paragraph (2), the Centennial Commission is authorized—
“(A)
to procure supplies, services, and property; and
“(B)
to make or enter into contracts, leases, or other legal agreements.
“(2)Limitation.—
The Centennial Commission may not enter into any contract, lease, or other legal agreement that extends beyond the date of the termination of the Centennial Commission under section 8(a).
“(f)Postal Services.—
The Centennial Commission may use the United States mails in the same manner and under the same conditions as other departments and agencies of the Federal Government.
“(g)Gifts, Bequests, and Devises.—
The Centennial Commission shall accept, use, and dispose of gifts, bequests, or devises of services or property, both real and personal, for the purpose of covering the costs incurred by the Centennial Commission to carry out its duties under this Act.
“SEC. 7.
CENTENNIAL COMMISSION PERSONNEL MATTERS.
“(a)Compensation of Members.—
Members of the Centennial Commission shall serve without compensation for such service.
“(b)Travel Expenses.—
Each member of the Centennial Commission shall be allowed travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in accordance with the applicable provisions of title 5, United States Code.
“(c) Staff.—
“(1)In general.—
The Chair of the Centennial Commission shall, in consultation with the members of the Centennial Commission, appoint an executive director and such other additional personnel as may be necessary to enable the Centennial Commission to perform its duties.
“(2) Compensation.—
“(A)In general.—
Subject to subparagraph (B), the Chair of the Centennial Commission may fix the compensation of the executive director and any other personnel appointed under paragraph (1), without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of title 5, United States Code, relating to classification and General Schedule pay rates.
“(B)Limitation.—
The Chair of the Centennial Commission may not fix the compensation of the executive director or other personnel appointed under paragraph (1) at a rate that exceeds the rate of payable [sic] for level II of the Executive Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code.
“(C)Work location.—
If the city government for Kansas City, Missouri, and the Liberty Memorial Association make space available in the building in which the America’s National World War I Museum is located, the executive director of the Centennial Commission and other personnel appointed under paragraph (1) shall work in such building to the extent practical.
“(d)Detail of Government Employees.—
Upon request of the Centennial Commission, the head of any Federal department or agency may detail, on a reimbursable basis, any employee of that department or agency to the Centennial Commission to assist it in carrying out its duties under this Act.
“(e)Procurement of Temporary and Intermittent Services.—
The Chair of the Centennial Commission may procure temporary and intermittent services under section 3109(b) of title 5, United States Code.
“SEC. 8.
TERMINATION OF CENTENNIAL COMMISSION.
“(a)In General.—Except as provided in subsection (c), the Centennial Commission shall terminate on the earlier of—
“(1)
the date that is 30 days after the date the completion of the activities under this Act honoring the centennial observation of World War I; or
“(2)
July 28, 2019.
“(b) Application of Federal Advisory Committee Act.—
“(1)In general.—
Except as provided in paragraph (2), the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall apply to the activities of the Centennial Commission under this Act.
“(2)Exception.—
Section 14(a)(2) of such Act shall not apply to the Centennial Commission.
“(c)Exception for Completion of World War I Memorial.—
The Centennial Commission may perform such work as is necessary to complete the rededication of a World War I Memorial and enhancement of the General Pershing Commemorative Work under section 3091(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 [Pub. L. 113–291, set out above], subject to section 8903 of title 40, United States Code.
“SEC. 9.
LIMITATION ON OBLIGATION OF FEDERAL FUNDS.

“No Federal funds may be obligated or expended for the designation, establishment, or enhancement of a memorial or commemorative work by the World War I Centennial Commission.”

Ronald Reagan Centennial Commission

Pub. L. 111–25, June 2, 2009, 123 Stat. 1767, as amended by Pub. L. 112–13, § 1, May 12, 2011, 125 Stat. 215, provided that:

“SECTION 1.
SHORT TITLE.

“This Act may be cited as the ‘Ronald Reagan Centennial Commission Act’.

“SEC. 2.
ESTABLISHMENT.

“There is established a commission to be known as the ‘Ronald Reagan Centennial Commission’ (in this Act referred to as the ‘Commission’).

“SEC. 3.
DUTIES OF COMMISSION.
“The Commission shall—
“(1)
plan, develop, and carry out such activities as the Commission considers fitting and proper to honor Ronald Reagan on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth;
“(2)
provide advice and assistance to Federal, State, and local governmental agencies, as well as civic groups[,] to carry out activities to honor Ronald Reagan on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth;
“(3)
develop activities that may be carried out by the Federal Government to determine whether the activities are fitting and proper to honor Ronald Reagan on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of his birth; and
“(4)
submit to the President and Congress reports pursuant to section 7.
“SEC. 4.
MEMBERSHIP.
“(a)Number and Appointment.—The Commission shall be composed of 11 members as follows:
“(1)
The Secretary of the Interior.
“(2)
Four members appointed by the President after considering the recommendations of the Board of Trustees of the Ronald Reagan Foundation.
“(3)
Two Members of the House of Representatives appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
“(4)
One Member of the House of Representatives appointed by the minority leader of the House of Representatives.
“(5)
Two Members of the Senate appointed by the majority leader of the Senate.
“(6)
One Member of the Senate appointed by the minority leader of the Senate.
“(b)Ex Officio Member.—
The Archivist of the United States shall serve in an ex officio capacity on the Commission to provide advice and information to the Commission.
“(c)Terms.—
Each member shall be appointed for the life of the Commission.
“(d)Deadline for Appointment.—
All members of the Commission shall be appointed not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act [June 2, 2009].
“(e)Vacancies.—A vacancy on the Commission shall—
“(1)
not affect the powers of the Commission; and
“(2)
be filled in the manner in which the original appointment was made.
“(f)Rates of Pay.—
Members shall not receive compensation for the performance of their duties on behalf of the Commission.
“(g)Travel Expenses.—
Each member of the Commission shall be reimbursed for travel and per diem in lieu of subsistence expenses during the performance of duties of the Commission while away from home or his or her regular place of business, in accordance with applicable provisions under subchapter I of chapter 57 of title 5, United States Code.
“(h)Quorum.—
A majority of the members of the Commission shall constitute a quorum to conduct business, but two or more members may hold hearings.
“(i)Chairperson.—
The chairperson of the Commission shall be elected by a majority vote of the members of the Commission.
“SEC. 5.
DIRECTOR AND STAFF OF COMMISSION.
“(a)Director and Staff.—
The Commission shall appoint an executive director and such other additional personnel as are necessary to enable the Commission to perform its duties.
“(b)Applicability of Certain Civil Service Laws.—
The executive director and staff of the Commission may be appointed without regard to the provisions of title 5, United States Code, governing appointments in the competitive service, and may be paid without regard to the provisions of chapter 51 and subchapter III of chapter 53 of such title relating to classification and General Schedule pay rates, except that the rate of pay for the executive director and other staff may not exceed the rate payable for level V of the Executive Schedule under section 5316 of such title.
“(c)Detail of Federal Employees.—
Upon request of the Commission, the Secretary of the Interior or the Archivist of the United States may detail, on a reimbursable basis, any of the personnel of that department or agency to the Commission to assist it in carrying out its duties under this Act.
“(d)Experts and Consultants.—
The Commission may procure such temporary and intermittent services as are necessary to enable the Commission to perform its duties.
“(e)Volunteer and Uncompensated Services.—
Notwithstanding section 1342 of title 31, United States Code, the Commission may accept and use voluntary and uncompensated services as the Commission determines necessary.
“SEC. 6.
POWERS OF COMMISSION.
“(a)Hearings.—
The Commission may, for the purpose of carrying out this Act, hold hearings, sit and act at times and places, take testimony, and receive evidence as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(b)Mails.—
The Commission may use the United States mails in the same manner and under the same conditions as other departments and agencies of the United States.
“(c)Obtaining Official Data.—
The Commission may secure directly from any department or agency of the United States information necessary to enable it to carry out its duties under this Act. Upon request of the chairperson of the Commission, the head of that department or agency shall furnish that information to the Commission.
“(d)Gifts, Bequests, Devises.—
The Commission may solicit, accept, use, and dispose of gifts, bequests, or devises of money, services, or property, both real and personal, for the purpose of aiding or facilitating its work.
“(e)Available Space.—
Upon the request of the Commission, the Administrator of General Services shall make available nationwide to the Commission, at a normal rental rate for Federal agencies, such assistance and facilities as may be necessary for the Commission to carry out its duties under this Act.
“(f)Contract Authority.—
The Commission may enter into contracts with and compensate government and private agencies or persons to enable the Commission to discharge its duties under this Act.
“SEC. 7.
REPORTS.
“(a)Annual Reports.—
The Commission shall submit to the President and the Congress annual reports on the revenue and expenditures of the Commission, including a list of each gift, bequest, or devise to the Commission with a value of more than $250, together with the identity of the donor of each gift, bequest, or devise.
“(b)Interim Reports.—
The Commission may submit to the President and Congress interim reports as the Commission considers appropriate.
“(c)Final Report.—Not later than November 30, 2011, the Commission shall submit a final report to the President and the Congress containing—
“(1)
a summary of the activities of the Commission;
“(2)
a final accounting of funds received and expended by the Commission; and
“(3)
the findings, conclusions, and final recommendations of the Commission.
“SEC. 8.
TERMINATION.

“The Commission may terminate on such date as the Commission may determine after it submits its final report pursuant to section 7(c), but not later than December 31, 2011.

“SEC. 9.
ANNUAL AUDIT.

“The Inspector General of the Department of the Interior may perform an audit of the Commission, shall make the results of any audit performed available to the public, and shall transmit such results to the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of the Senate.

“SEC. 10.
PROHIBITION ON OBLIGATION OF FEDERAL FUNDS.

“No Federal funds may be obligated to carry out this Act.”

225th Anniversary of the American Revolution Commemoration

Pub. L. 108–447, div. J, title II, Dec. 8, 2004, 118 Stat. 3348, provided that:

“SEC. 201.
SHORT TITLE.

“This title may be cited as the ‘225th Anniversary of the American Revolution Commemoration Act’.

“SEC. 202.
FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.
“(a) FINDINGS.—Congress finds the following:
“(1)
The American Revolution, inspired by the spirit of liberty and independence among the inhabitants of the original 13 colonies of Great Britain, was an event of global significance having a profound and lasting effect upon American Government, laws, culture, society, and values.
“(2)
The years 2000 through 2008 mark the 225th anniversary of the Revolutionary War.
“(3)
Every generation of American citizens should have an opportunity to understand and appreciate the continuing legacy of the American Revolution.
“(4)
This 225th anniversary provides an opportunity to enhance public awareness and understanding of the impact of the American Revolution’s legacy on the lives of citizens today.
“(5)
Although the National Park Service administers battlefields, historical parks, historic sites, and programs that address elements of the story of the American Revolution, there is a need to establish partnerships that link sites and programs administered by the National Park Service with those of other Federal and non-Federal entities in order to place the story of the American Revolution in the broad context of its causes, consequences, and meanings.
“(6)
The story and significance of the American Revolution can best engage the American people through a national program of the National Park Service that links historic structures and sites, routes, activities, community projects, exhibits, and multimedia materials, in a manner that is both unified and flexible.
“(b)Purposes.—The purposes of this Act [probably should be “title”] are as follows:
“(1)
To recognize the enduring importance of the American Revolution in the lives of American citizens today.
“(2)
To authorize the National Park Service to coordinate, connect, and facilitate Federal and non-Federal activities to commemorate, honor, and interpret the history of the American Revolution, its significance, and its relevance to the shape and spirit of American Government and society.
“SEC. 203.
225TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION COMMEMORATION PROGRAM.
“(a)In General.—The Secretary of the Interior (hereinafter in this Act [title] referred to as the ‘Secretary’) shall establish a program to be known as the ‘225th Anniversary of the American Revolution Commemoration’ (hereinafter in this Act [title] referred to as the ‘225th Anniversary’). In administering the 225th Anniversary, the Secretary shall—
“(1)
produce and disseminate to appropriate persons educational materials, such as handbooks, maps, interpretive guides, or electronic information related to the 225th Anniversary and the American Revolution;
“(2)
enter into appropriate cooperative agreements and memoranda of understanding to provide technical assistance under subsection (c);
“(3)
assist in the protection of resources associated with the American Revolution;
“(4)
enhance communications, connections, and collaboration among the National Park Service units and programs related to the Revolutionary War;
“(5)
expand the research base for American Revolution interpretation and education; and
“(6)
create and adopt an official, uniform symbol or device for the theme ‘Lighting Freedom’s Flame: American Revolution, 225th Anniversary’ and issue regulations for its use.
“(b)Elements.—The 225th Anniversary shall encompass the following elements:
“(1)
All units and programs of the National Park Service determined by the Secretary to pertain to the American Revolution.
“(2)
Other governmental and nongovernmental sites, facilities, and programs of an educational, research, or interpretive nature that are documented to be directly related to the American Revolution.
“(3)
Through the Secretary of State, the participation of the Governments of the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Spain, and Canada.
“(c)Cooperative Agreements and Memoranda of Understanding.—To achieve the purposes of this Act [title] and to ensure effective coordination of the Federal and non-Federal elements of the 225th Anniversary with National Park Service units and programs, the Secretary may enter into cooperative agreements and memoranda of understanding with, and provide technical assistance to, the following:
“(1)
The heads of other Federal agencies, States, units of local government, and private entities.
“(2)
In cooperation with the Secretary of State, the Governments of the United Kingdom, France, the Netherlands, Spain, and Canada.
“(d)Authorization of Appropriations.—
There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out this Act [title] $500,000 for each of fiscal years 2004 through 2009.”

Benjamin Franklin Tercentenary Commission

Pub. L. 107–202, July 24, 2002, 116 Stat. 739, known as the Benjamin Franklin Tercentenary Commission Act, created the Commission to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Franklin’s birth, established the Commission’s membership, duties and powers, authorized appropriations, required interim reports and a final report by Jan. 16, 2007, and provided that the Commission would terminate 120 days after submitting its final report.

Brown v. Board of Education 50th Anniversary Commission

Pub. L. 107–41, Sept. 18, 2001, 115 Stat. 226, created the Brown v. Board of Education 50th Anniversary Commission to plan and coordinate the commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the Supreme Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education and provided for reports by the Commission and for its termination not later than Feb. 1, 2005.

James Madison Commemoration Commission

Pub. L. 106–550, Dec. 19, 2000, 114 Stat. 2745, known as the James Madison Commemoration Commission Act, created the James Madison Commemoration Commission and the James Madison Commemoration Advisory Committee, directed them to prepare various publications, activities, and events relating to the life of James Madison, and provided for a final report by the Commission not later than Feb. 15, 2002, and the termination of the Commission and Committee not later than 60 days after submission of the report.

Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission

Pub. L. 106–173, Feb. 25, 2000, 114 Stat. 14, as amended by Pub. L. 107–20, title II, § 2804, July 24, 2001, 115 Stat. 185; Pub. L. 107–68, title II, § 209, Nov. 12, 2001, 115 Stat. 588; Pub. L. 107–117, div. B, § 917(a), Jan. 10, 2002, 115 Stat. 2324; Pub. L. 108–7, div. H, title I, § 1304, Feb. 20, 2003, 117 Stat. 379; Pub. L. 108–59, § 1, July 14, 2003, 117 Stat. 860; Pub. L. 111–8, div. G, title I, § 1204, Mar. 11, 2009, 123 Stat. 826, known as the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission Act, established the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission to plan and carry out various activities to honor the bicentennial anniversary of Lincoln’s birth and provided for a final report by the Commission not later than Apr. 30, 2010, and termination of the Commission 120 days after submission of the report.

Proc. No. 9452. Armed Forces Day

Proc. No. 9452, May 20, 2016, 81 F.R. 33327, provided:

The Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines, and Coast Guardsmen who comprise our Armed Forces have defended our Nation and the values for which we stand for generations, answering the call to give up the comforts of civilian life, do whatever it takes to keep us safe, and go wherever they are needed. On Armed Forces Day, we offer our most profound gratitude to the patriots—at home and abroad—who have risked their lives so our people can live knowing the fullest measure of freedom and security.

With courage and honor, our men and women in uniform embody the everlasting responsibility we have to each other and to future generations by giving of themselves to ensure the preservation of our Republic and secure peace throughout the world. It is because of them and the values they represent that people across the globe look to the United States of America in moments of desperation and despair. For the relief they offer, the stability they provide, and the hope they inspire, we owe our service members an extraordinary debt—one we will never stop working to repay.

Our country’s strength is measured by how we support and take care of our troops. Humbled by the sacrifices they make—and by the strength of their families—we stand in support of those who don our uniform and strive to ensure they have every opportunity to pursue the American dream they defend. They give their best for America, and they deserve the best from us. On this day, let us salute these brave Americans and all those who laid down their lives for our safety, and each day, let us remember that we live knowing liberty because of our Armed Forces.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, and Commander in Chief of the Armed Forces of the United States, continuing the precedent of my predecessors in office, do hereby proclaim the third Saturday of each May as Armed Forces Day.

I direct the Secretary of Defense on behalf of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, and the Secretary of Homeland Security on behalf of the Coast Guard, to plan for appropriate observances each year, with the Secretary of Defense responsible for encouraging the participation and cooperation of civil authorities and private citizens.

I invite the Governors of the United States and its Territories, and appropriate officials of all units of government, to provide for the observance of Armed Forces Day within their jurisdiction each year in an appropriate manner designed to increase public understanding and appreciation of the Armed Forces of the United States. I also invite veterans, civic leaders, and organizations to join in the observance of Armed Forces Day.

Finally, I call upon all Americans to display the flag of the United States at their homes on Armed Forces Day, and I urge citizens to learn more about military service by attending and participating in the local observances of the day. I also encourage Americans to volunteer at organizations that provide support to our troops and their families.

Proclamation 9283 of May 15, 2015, is hereby superseded.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand sixteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and fortieth.

Barack Obama.

Prior similar proclamations were contained in the following:

Proc. No. 9283, May 15, 2015, 80 F.R. 29199, superseded by Proc. No. 9452, May 20, 2016, 81 F.R. 33327.

Proc. No. 9129, May 16, 2014, 79 F.R. 29321, superseded by Proc. No. 9283, May 15, 2015, 80 F.R. 29200.

Proc. No. 8984, May 17, 2013, 78 F.R. 30731, superseded by Proc. No. 9129, May 16, 2014, 79 F.R. 29321.

Proc. No. 8823, May 18, 2012, 77 F.R. 30875, superseded by Proc. No. 8984, May 17, 2013, 78 F.R. 30731.

Proc. No. 8681, May 20, 2011, 76 F.R. 30497, superseded by Proc. No. 8823, May 18, 2012, 77 F.R. 30875.

Proc. No. 8522, May 14, 2010, 75 F.R. 28185, superseded by Proc. No. 8681, May 20, 2011, 76 F.R. 30497.

Proc. No. 8380, May 14, 2009, 74 F.R. 23603, superseded by Proc. No. 8522, May 14, 2010, 75 F.R. 28185.

Proc. No. 7562, May 16, 2002, 67 F.R. 35707, superseded by Proc. No. 8380, May 14, 2009, 74 F.R. 23603.

Proc. No. 6693, May 21, 1994, 59 F.R. 26923, superseded by Proc. No. 7562, May 16, 2002, 67 F.R. 35707.

Proc. No. 5983, May 17, 1989, 54 F.R. 21593, superseded by Proc. No. 6693, May 21, 1994, 59 F.R. 26923.

Proc. No. 4934, Apr. 16, 1982, 47 F.R. 16767, superseded by Proc. No. 5983, May 17, 1989, 54 F.R. 21593.

Proc. No. 4571, May 15, 1978, 43 F.R. 21313, superseded by Proc. No. 4934, Apr. 16, 1982, 47 F.R. 16767.

Proc. No. 4492, Mar. 22, 1977, 42 F.R. 15889, superseded by Proc. No. 4571, May 15, 1978, 43 F.R. 21313.

Proc. No. 4357, Mar. 25, 1975, 40 F.R. 13293, superseded by Proc. No. 4492, Mar. 22, 1977, 42 F.R. 15889.

Proc. No. 4276, Mar. 21, 1974, 39 F.R. 10877, superseded by Proc. No. 4357, Mar. 25, 1975, 40 F.R. 13293.

Proc. No. 3655, May 7, 1965, 30 F.R. 6467, superseded by Proc. No. 4276, Mar. 21, 1974, 39 F.R. 10877.

Proc. No. 3399, Mar. 22, 1961, 26 F.R. 2501, superseded by Proc. No. 3655, May 7, 1965, 30 F.R. 6467.

Proc. No. 3172, Mar. 6, 1957, 22 F.R. 1427, superseded by Proc. No. 3399, Mar. 22, 1961, 26 F.R. 2501.

Proc. No. 8455. National Farm-City Week

Proc. No. 8455, Nov. 20, 2009, 74 F.R. 61261, provided:

Our Nation’s farm and ranch families supply many of the basic necessities of our daily life. They manage a large portion of our country’s fertile land base, and they are caretakers of our valuable natural resources and diverse ecosystems. Their connections with urban and suburban communities are critical to our economy and to the nourishment of our people. During National Farm-City Week, we express gratitude for the contributions of our Nation’s farmers and ranchers, and we rededicate ourselves to providing all Americans with access to healthy food, and thus, a healthy future.

Pioneered by Native Americans, agriculture was our Nation’s first industry. For agriculture to thrive in the 21st century, we must continue to cultivate the relationships between farmers and rural businesses and their partners and customers in cities and towns. American farmers and ranchers are proud to grow the food, feed, fuel, and fiber that enhance our national security and prosperity, and remain steadfast stewards of the land they love. We must ensure that farming is maintained as an economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable way of life for future generations.

This Thanksgiving season, we celebrate farms of every size that produce fruits, vegetables, dairy, and livestock indispensable to the health of our families. We also recognize the vital ties between our urban and suburban communities and their local farmers through regional food systems, farmers markets, and community gardens. During National Farm-City Week, we celebrate the bounty of America, and we honor the commitment of those who grow, harvest, and deliver agricultural goods to feed our country and grow our economy.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim the week ending on Thanksgiving Day of each year as National Farm-City Week. I call on Americans as they gather with their families and friends to reflect on the accomplishments of all who dedicate their lives to promoting our Nation’s agricultural abundance and environmental stewardship.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this twentieth day of November, in the year of our Lord two thousand nine, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fourth.

Barack Obama.
Proc. No. 8641. Cesar Chavez Day

Proc. No. 8641, Mar. 30, 2011, 76 F.R. 18629, provided:

Our Nation’s story of progress is rich with profound struggle and great sacrifice, marked by the selfless acts and fearless leadership of remarkable Americans. A true champion for justice, Cesar Chavez advocated for and won many of the rights and benefits we now enjoy, and his spirit lives on in the hands and hearts of working women and men today. As we celebrate the anniversary of his birth, we honor Cesar Chavez’s lasting victories for American workers and his noble methods in achieving them.

Raised in the fields of Arizona and California, Cesar Chavez faced hardship and injustice from a young age. At the time, farm workers toiled in the shadows of society, vulnerable to abuse and exploitation. Families like Chavez’s were impoverished; exposed to hazardous working conditions and dangerous pesticides; and often denied clean drinking water, toilets, and other basic necessities.

Cesar Chavez saw the need for change and made a courageous choice to work to improve the lives of his fellow farm workers. Through boycotts and fasts, he led others on a path of nonviolence conceived in careful study of the teachings of St. Francis of Assisi and Mahatma Gandhi, and in the powerful example of Martin Luther King, Jr. He became a community organizer and began his lifelong advocacy to protect and empower people. With quiet leadership and a powerful voice, Cesar founded the United Farm Workers (UFW) with Dolores Huerta, launching one of our Nation’s most inspiring social movements.

Cesar Chavez’s legacy provides lessons from which all Americans can learn. One person can change the course of a nation and improve the lives of countless individuals. Cesar once said, “Non-violence is not inaction. … Non-violence is hard work. It is the willingness to sacrifice. It is the patience to win.” From his inspiring accomplishments, we have learned that social justice takes action, selflessness, and commitment. As we face the challenges of our day, let us do so with the hope and determination of Cesar Chavez, echoing the words that were his rallying cry and that continue to inspire so many today, “Sí, se puede”—“Yes, we can.”

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim March 31 of each year as Cesar Chavez Day. I call upon all Americans to observe this day with appropriate service, community, and educational programs to honor Cesar Chavez’s enduring legacy.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirtieth day of March, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

Barack Obama.
Proc. No. 8647. World Autism Awareness Day

Proc. No. 8647, Apr. 1, 2011, 76 F.R. 19265, provided:

With autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affecting nearly one percent of children in the United States, autism is an urgent public health issue with a profound impact on millions of Americans. World Autism Awareness Day is an opportunity to recognize the contributions of individuals with ASDs and rededicate ourselves to the cause of understanding and responding to autism.

Men and women on the autism spectrum have thrived and excelled in communities across America and around the world. Yet, despite great progress in understanding ASDs, challenges remain for these individuals and their loved ones. For too long, the needs of people living with autism and their families have gone without adequate support and understanding. While we continue to encourage the development of resources for children on the autism spectrum and provide necessary resources for their families, we must also remember that young people with ASDs become adults with ASDs who deserve our support, our respect, and the opportunity to realize their highest aspirations.

As our understanding of the autism spectrum grows, my Administration remains dedicated to supporting children and adults impacted by autism. Led by the Department of Health and Human Services, we have expanded investments in autism research, public health tracking, early detection, and services—from early intervention for children to improved long-term services and support programs for adults. My Administration maintains a firm commitment to advance autism research and treatment, as well as promote education, employment, and equality for all individuals with autism, from early childhood through employment and community life. We will continue to work with the Congress, experts, and families to improve Federal and State programs that assist individuals with ASDs and their families and to bolster the impact and reach of community support and services. I encourage all Americans to visit www.HHS.gov/autism for more information and resources on ASDs.

With each breakthrough in research and each innovative treatment, we open endless possibilities for the many American families who have been touched by autism. As we mark World Autism Awareness Day, let us recommit to improving the lives of individuals and families impacted by ASDs and creating a world free from discrimination where all can achieve their fullest potential.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim April 2 of each year as World Autism Awareness Day. I call upon the people of the United States to learn more about autism and what they can do to support individuals on the autism spectrum and their families.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this first day of April, in the year of our Lord two thousand eleven, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth.

Barack Obama.
Executive Order No. 13072

Ex. Ord. No. 13072, Feb. 2, 1998, 63 F.R. 6041, provided for formation of the White House Millennium Council to lead the country in a celebration of the new millennium by initiating and recognizing national and local projects that contributed in educational, creative, and productive ways to America’s commemoration of that historic time.

 

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