50 CFR 17.40 - Special rules

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§ 17.40 Special rules - mammals.

(a) Mazama pocket gophers (Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm) (Thomomys mazama pugetensis, glacialis, tumuli, and yelmensis) - (1) Which populations of the Mazama pocket gopher are covered by this special rule? This special rule covers the four Thurston/Pierce subspecies of the Mazama pocket gopher (Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm) (Thomomys mazama pugetensis, glacialis, tumuli, and yelmensis) wherever they occur.

(2) What activities are prohibited? Except as noted in paragraphs (a)(3) through (7) of this section, all prohibitions of § 17.31 apply to the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers.

(3) What activities are allowed on civilian airports? Incidental take of the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from non-Federal routine maintenance activities in or adjacent to Mazama pocket gopher habitat and associated with airport operations on civilian airports. Routine maintenance activities include the following:

(i) Routine management, repair, and maintenance of runways, roads, and taxiways (does not include upgrades, or construction of new runways, roads, or taxiways, or new development at airports);

(ii) Hazing of hazardous wildlife;

(iii) Management of forage, water, and shelter to reduce the attractiveness of the area around airports for hazardous wildlife; and

(iv) Control or other management of noxious weeds and invasive plants through mowing, discing, herbicide and fungicide application, fumigation, or burning. Use of herbicides, fungicides, fumigation, and burning must occur in such a way that nontarget plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable.

(4) What agricultural activities are allowed on non-Federal lands? Incidental take of the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from agricultural or horticultural (farming) practices implemented on such lands consistent with State laws on non-Federal lands. For the purposes of this special rule, farm means any facility, including land, buildings, watercourses, and appurtenances, used in the commercial production of crops, nursery or orchard stock, the propagation and raising of nursery or orchard stock, livestock or poultry, or livestock or poultry products.

(i) For the purposes of this special rule, an agricultural (farming) practice means a mode of operation on a farm that:

(A) Is or may be used on a farm of a similar nature;

(B) Is a generally accepted, reasonable, and prudent method for the operation of the farm to obtain a profit in money;

(C) Is or may become a generally accepted, reasonable, and prudent method in conjunction with farm use;

(D) Complies with applicable State laws;

(E) Is done in a reasonable and prudent manner.

(ii) Accepted agricultural or horticultural (farming) practices include:

(A) Grazing;

(B) Routine installation, management, and maintenance of stock water facilities such as stock ponds, berms, troughs, and tanks, pipelines and watering systems to maintain water supplies;

(C) Routine maintenance or construction of fencing;

(D) Planting, harvest, fertilization, harrowing, tilling, or rotation of crops (Disturbance to the soils shall not exceed a 12-inch (30.5-cm) depth. All activities that do not disturb the soil surface are also allowed, such as haying, baling, some orchard and berry plant management activities, etc.);

(E) Maintenance of livestock management facilities such as corrals, sheds, and other ranch outbuildings;

(F) Repair and maintenance of unimproved agricultural roads (This exemption does not include improvement, upgrade, or construction of new roads.);

(G) Placement of mineral supplements, plant nutrients, or soil amendments;

(H) Harvest, control, or other management of noxious weeds and invasive plants through mowing, discing, herbicide and fungicide application, fumigation, or burning (Use of herbicides, fungicides, fumigation, and burning must occur in such a way that nontarget plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable.); and

(I) Deep tillage (usually at depths of 18-36 inches (45.7-91.4 cm), for compaction reduction purposes) occurring between September 1 and February 28, no more often than once in 10 years.

(5) What noncommercial activities are allowed on single-family residential private land? Incidental take of the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from noncommercial activities that occur in or adjacent to Mazama pocket gopher habitat on existing single-family residential properties. These activities include the following:

(i) Harvest, control, or other management of noxious weeds and invasive plants through mowing, herbicide and fungicide application, fumigation, or burning. Use of herbicides, fungicides, fumigation, and burning must occur in such a way that nontarget plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable;

(ii) Construction and placement of fencing, garden plots, or play equipment; and

(iii) Construction and placement of dog kennels, carports, or storage sheds less than 120 ft 2 (11.15 m 2) in size.

(6) What noxious weed and invasive plant control activities are allowed on non-Federal lands? Incidental take of the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine removal or other management of noxious weeds and invasive plants. Routine removal or other management of noxious weeds and invasive plants are limited to the following, and must be conducted in a way that impacts to nontarget plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable:

(i) Mowing;

(ii) Discing;

(iii) Herbicide and fungicide application;

(iv) Fumigation; and

(v) Burning.

(7) What roadside right-of-way maintenance activities are allowed on Federal and non-Federal lands? Incidental take of the Olympia, Roy Prairie, Tenino, and Yelm pocket gophers will not be a violation of section 9 of the Act, if the incidental take results from routine maintenance of roadside rights-of-way on Federal and non-Federal lands. Routine maintenance activities of roadside rights-of-way of highways and roads are limited to the following, and must be conducted in a way that impacts to nontarget plants are avoided to the maximum extent practicable:

(i) Mowing;

(ii) Mechanical removal of noxious weeds or invasive plants;

(iii) Selective application of herbicides for removal of noxious weeds or invasive plants; and

(iv) Repair or maintenance of fences.

(b) Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) - (1) Prohibitions. The following prohibitions apply to the grizzly bear:

(i) Taking.

(A) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(i)(B) through (F) of this section, no person shall take any grizzly bear in the 48 conterminous states of the United States.

(B) Grizzly bears may be taken in self-defense or in defense of others, but such taking shall be reported by the individual who has taken the bear or his designee within 5 days of occurrence to the Resident Agent in Charge, Office of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2900 4th Avenue North, Suite 301, Billings, MT 59101 (406-247-7355), if occurring in Montana or Wyoming, or the Special Agent in Charge, Office of Law Enforcement, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, P.O. Box 9, Sherwood, OR 97140 (503-521-5300), if occurring in Idaho or Washington, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities. Grizzly bears taken in self-defense or in defense of others, including the parts of such bears, shall not be possessed, delivered, carried, transported, shipped, exported, received, or sold, except by Federal, State, or Tribal authorities.

(C) Removal of nuisance bears. A grizzly bear consituting a demonstrable but non immediate threat to human safety or committing significant depredations to lawfully present livestock, crops, or beehives may be taken, but only if:

(1) It has not been reasonably possible to eliminate such threat or depredation by live-capturing and releasing unharmed in a remote area the grizzly bear involved; and

(2) The taking is done in a humane manner by authorized Federal, State, or Tribal authorities, and in accordance with current interagency guidelines covering the taking of such nuisance bears; and

(3) The taking is reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement office, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(D) Federal, State, or Tribal scientific or research activities. Federal, State, or Tribal authorities may take grizzly bears for scientific or research purposes, but only if such taking does not result in death or permanent injury to the bears involved. Such taking must be reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement office, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(E) [Reserved]

(F) National Parks. The regulations of the National Park Service shall govern all taking of grizzly bears in National Parks.

(ii) Unlawfully taken grizzly bears.

(A) Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(ii)(B) and (iv) of this section, no person shall possess, deliver, carry, transport, ship, export, receive, or sell any unlawfully taken grizzly bear. Any unlawful taking of a grizzly bear shall be reported within 5 days of occurrence to the appropriate U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service law enforcement office, as indicated in paragraph (b)(1)(i)(B) of this section, and to appropriate State and Tribal authorities.

(B) Authorized Federal, State, or Tribal employees, when acting in the course of their official duties, may, for scientific or research purposes, possess, deliver, carry, transport, ship, export, or receive unlawfully taken grizzly bears.

(iii) Import or export. Except as provided in paragraphs (b)(1)(iii) (A) and (B) and (iv) of this section, no person shall import any grizzly bear into the United States.

(A) Federal, State, or Tribal scientific or research activities. Federal, State, or Tribal authorities may import grizzly bears into the United States for scientific or research purposes.

(B) Public zoological institution. Public zoological institutions (see 50 CFR 10.12) may import grizzly bears into the United States.

(iv) Commercial transactions.

(A) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(1)(iv)(B) of this section, no person shall, in the course of commercial activity, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce any grizzly bear.

(B) A public zoological institution (see 50 CFR 10.12) dealing with other public zoological institutions may sell grizzly bears or offer them for sale in interstate or foreign commerce, and may, in the course of commercial activity, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship grizzly bears in interstate or foreign commerce.

(v) Other violations. No person shall attempt to commit, cause to be committed, or solicit another to commit any act prohibited by paragraph (b)(1) of this section.

(2) Definitions. As used in paragraph (b) of this section:

Grizzly bear means any member of the species Ursus arctos horribilis of the 48 conterminous States of the United States, including any part, offspring, dead body, part of a dead body, or product of such species.

Grizzly bear accompanied by young means any grizzly bear having offspring, including one or more cubs, yearlings, or 2-year-olds, in its immediate vicinity.

Identified means permanently marked or documented so as to be identifiable by law enforcement officials at a subsequent date.

State, Federal or Tribal authority means an employee of State, Federal, or Indian Tribal government who, as part of his/her official duties, normally handles grizzly bears.

Young grizzly bear means a cub, yearling, or 2-year-old grizzly bear.

(c) Primates.

(1) Except as noted in paragraph (c)(2) of this section, all provisions of § 17.31 apply to the lesser slow loris (Nycticebus pygmaeus); Philippine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta); white-footed tamarin (Saguinus leucopus); black howler monkey (Alouatta pigra); stump-tailed macaque (Macaca arctoides); gelada baboon (Theropithecus gelada); Formosan rock macaque (Macaca cyclopis); Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata); Toque macaque (Macaca sinica); long-tailed langur (Presbytis potenziani); purple-faced langur (Presbytis senex); and Tonkin snub-nosed langur (Pygathrix [Rhinopithecus] avunculus).

(2) The prohibitions referred to above do not apply to any live member of such species held in captivity in the United States on the effective date of the final rulemaking, or to the progeny of such animals, or to the progeny of animals legally imported into the United States after the effective date of the final rulemaking, Provided, That the person wishing to engage in any activity which would otherwise be prohibited must be able to show satisfactory documentary or other evidence as to the captive status of the particular member of the species on the effective date of this rulemaking or that the particular member of the species was born in captivity in the United States after the effective date of this rulemaking. Identification of the particular member to a record in the International Species Inventory System (ISIS), or to a Federal, State or local government permit, shall be deemed to be satisfactory evidence. Records in the form of studbooks or inventories, kept in the normal course of business, shall be acceptable as evidence, provided that a notarized statement is inserted in such record to the effect that:

(i) The records were kept in the normal course of business prior to November 18, 1976, and accurately identify (by use of markers, tags, or other acceptable marking devices) individual animals; or

(ii) That the individual animal identified by the records was born in captivity on ____(Date).

The notarized statement in paragraph (c)(2)(i) of this section, shall be acceptable only if the notarization is dated on or before January 3, 1977. The notarized statement in paragraph (c)(2)(ii), of this section, shall be acceptable only if the notarization is dated within 15 days of the date of birth of the animal.

(d) Gray wolf (Canis lupus) in Minnesota.

(1) Zones. For purposes of these regulations, the State of Minnesota is divided into the following five zones:

(i) Zone 1 - 4,488 square miles. Beginning at the point of intersection of United States and Canadian boundaries in Section 22, Township 71 North, Range 22 West, in Rainy Lake, then proceeding along the west side of Sections 22, 27, and 34 in said Township and Sections 3, 10, 15, 22, 27 and 34 in Township 70 North, Range 22 West and Sections 3 and 10 in Township 69 North, Range 22 West; then east along the south boundaries of Sections 10, 11, and 12 in said Township; then south along the Koochiching and St. Louis counties line to Highway 53; thence southeasterly along State Highway 53 to the junction with County Route 765; thence easterly along County Route 765 to the junction with Kabetogama Lake in Ash River Bay; thence along the south boundary of Section 33 in Township 69 North, Range 19 West, to the junction with the Moose River; thence southeasterly along the Moose River to Moose Lake; thence along the western shore of Moose Lake to the river between Moose Lake and Long Lake; thence along the said river to Long Lake; thence along the east shore of Long Lake to the drainage on the southeast side of Long Lake in NE\1/4\, Section 18, Township 67 North, Range 18 West; thence along the said drainage southeasterly and subsequently northeasterly to Marion Lake, the drainage being in Sections 17 and 18, Township 67 North, Range 18 West; thence along the west shoreline of Marion Lake proceeding southeasterly to the Moose Creek; thence along Moose Creek to Flap Creek; thence southeasterly along Flap Creek to the Vermilion River; thence southerly along the Vermilion River to Vermilion Lake; thence along the Superior National Forest boundary in a southeasterly direction through Vermilion Lake passing these points: Oak Narrows, Muskrat Channel, South of Pine Island, to Hoodo Point and the junction with County Route 697; thence southeasterly on County Route 697 to the junction with State Highway 169; thence easterly along State Highway 169 to the junction with State Highway 1; thence easterly along State Highway 1 to the junction with the Erie Railroad tracks at Murphy City; thence easterly along the Erie Railroad tracks to the junction with Lake Superior at Taconite Harbor; thence northeasterly along the North Shore of Lake Superior to the Canadian Border; thence westerly along the Canadian Border to the point of beginning in Rainy Lake.

(ii) Zone 2 - 1,856 square miles. Beginning at the intersection of the Erie Mining Co. Railroad and State Highway 1 (Murphy City); thence southeasterly on State Highway 1 to the junction with County Road 4; thence southwesterly on County Road 4 to the State Snowmobile Trail (formerly the Alger-Smith Railroad); thence southwesterly to the intersection of the Old Railroad Grade and Reserve Mining Co. Railroad in Section 33 of Township 56 North, Range 9 West; thence northwesterly along the Railroad to Forest Road 107; thence westerly along Forest Road 107 to Forest Road 203; thence westerly along Forest Road 203 to the junction with County Route 2; thence in a northerly direction on County Route 2 to the junction with Forest Road 122; thence in a westerly direction along Forest Road 122 to the junction with the Duluth, Missable and Iron Range Railroad; thence in a southwesterly direction along the said railroad tracks to the junction with County Route 14; thence in a northwesterly direction along County Route 14 to the junction with County Route 55; thence in a westerly direction along County Route 55 to the junction with County Route 44; thence in a southerly direction along County Route 44 to the junction with County Route 266; thence in a southeasterly direction along County Route 266 and subsequently in a westerly direction to the junction with County Road 44; thence in a northerly direction on County Road 44 to the junction with Township Road 2815; thence westerly along Township Road 2815 to Alden Lake; thence northwesterly across Alden Lake to the inlet of the Cloquet River; thence northerly along the Cloquet River to the junction with Carrol Trail-State Forestry Road; thence west along the Carrol Trail to the junction with County Route 4 and County Route 49; thence west along County Route 49 to the junction with the Duluth, Winnipeg and Pacific Railroad; thence in a northerly direction along said Railroad to the junction with the Whiteface River; thence in a northeasterly direction along the Whiteface River to the Whiteface Reservoir; thence along the western shore of the Whiteface Reservoir to the junction with County Route 340; thence north along County Route 340 to the junction with County Route 16; thence east along County Route 16 to the junction with County Route 346; thence in a northerly direction along County Route 346 to the junction with County Route 569; thence along County Route 569 to the junction with County Route 565; thence in a westerly direction along County Route 565 to the junction with County Route 110; thence in a westerly direction along County Route 110 to the junction with County Route 100; thence in a north and subsequent west direction along County Route 100 to the junction with State Highway 135; thence in a northerly direction along State Highway 135 to the junction with State Highway 169 at Tower; thence in an easterly direction along the southern boundary of Zone 1 to the point of beginning of Zone 2 at the junction of the Erie Railroad Tracks and State Highway 1.

(iii) Zone 3 - 3,501 square miles. Beginning at the junction of State Highway 11 and State Highway 65; thence southeasterly along State Highway 65 to the junction with State Highway 1; thence westerly along State Highway 1 to the junction with State Highway 72; thence north along State Highway 72 to the junction with an un-numbered township road beginning in the northeast corner of Section 25, Township 155 North, Range 31 West; thence westerly along the said road for approximately seven (7) miles to the junction with SFR 95: Thence westerly along SFR 95 and continuing west through the southern boundary of Sections 36 through 31, Township 155 North, Range 33 West, through Sections 36 through 31, Township 155 North, Range 34 West, through Sections 36 through 31, Township 155 North, Range 35 West, through Sections 36 and 35, Township 155 North, Range 36 West to the junction with State Highway 89, thence northwesterly along State Highway 89 to the junction with County Route 44; thence northerly along County Route 44 to the junction with County Route 704; thence northerly along County 704 to the junction with SFR 49; thence northerly along SFR 49 to the junction with SFR 57; thence easterly along SFR 57 to the junction with SFR 63: Thence south along SFR 63 to the junction with SFR 70; thence easterly along SFR 70 to the junction with County Route 87; thence easterly along County Route 87 to the junction with County Route 1; thence south along County Route 1 to the junction with County Route 16; thence easterly along County Route 16 to the junction with State Highway 72; thence south on State Highway 72 to the junction with a gravel road (un-numbered County District Road) on the north side of Section 31, Township 158 North, Range 30 West; thence east on said District Road to the junction with SFR 62; thence easterly on SFR 62 to the junction with SFR 175; thence south on SFR 175 to the junction with County Route 101; thence easterly on County Route 101 to the junction with County Route 11; thence easterly on County Route 11 to the junction with State Highway 11; thence easterly on State Highway 11 to the junction with State Highway 65, the point of beginning.

(iv) Zone 4 - 20,883 square miles. Excluding Zones 1, 2 and 3, all that part of Minnesota north and east of a line beginning on State Trunk Highway 48 at the eastern boundary of the state; thence westerly along Highway 48 to Interstate Highway 35; thence northerly on I-35 to State Highway 23, thence west one-half mile on Highway 23 to State Trunk Highway 18; thence westerly along Highway 18 to State Trunk Highway 65, thence northerly on Highway 65 to State Trunk Highway 210; thence westerly along Highway 210 to State Trunk Highway 6; thence northerly on State Trunk Highway 6 to Emily; thence westerly along County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 1, Crow Wing County, to CSAH 2, Cass County; thence westerly along CSAH 2 to Pine River; thence northwesterly along State Trunk Highway 371 to Backus; thence westerly along State Trunk Highway 87 to U.S. Highway 71; thence northerly along U.S. 71 to State Trunk Highway 200; thence northwesterly along Highway 200, to County State Aid Highway (CSAH) 2, Clearwater County; thence northerly along CSAH 2 to Shevlin; thence along U.S. Highway 2 to Bagley; thence northerly along State Trunk Highway 92 to Gully; thence northerly along CSAH 2, Polk County, to CSAH 27, Pennington County; thence along CSAH 27 to State Trunk Highway 1; thence easterly on Highway 1 to CSAH 28, Pennington County; thence northerly along CSAH 28 to CSAH 54, Marshall County, thence northerly along CSAH 54 to Grygla; thence west and northerly along Highway 89 to Roseau; thence northerly along State Truck Highway 310 to the Canadian border.

(v) Zone 5 - 54,603 square miles. All that part of Minnesota south and west of the line described as the south and west border of Zone 4.

(vi) Map of regulatory zones follows:

(2) Prohibitions. The following prohibitions apply to the gray wolf in Minnesota.

(i) Taking. Except as provided in this paragraph (d)(2)(i) of this section, no person may take a gray wolf in Minnesota.

(A) Any person may take a gray wolf in Minnesota in defense of his own life or the lives of others.

(B) Any employee or agent of the Service, any other Federal land management agency, or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who is designated by his/her agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his or her official duties, take a gray wolf in Minnesota without a permit if such action is necessary to:

(1) Aid a sick, injured or orphaned specimen; or

(2) Dispose of a dead specimen; or

(3) Salvage a dead specimen which may be useful for scientific study.

(C) Designated employees or agents of the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources may take a gray wolf without a permit in Minnesota, in zones 2, 3, 4, and 5, as delineated in paragraph (d)(l) of this section, in response to depredations by a gray wolf on lawfully present domestic animals: Provided, that such taking must occur within one-half mile of the place where such depredation occurred and must be performed in a humane manner: And provided further, that any young of the year taken on or before August 1 of that year must be released.

(D) Any taking pursuant to paragraph (d)(2)(i)(A), (d)(2)(i)(B), or (d)(2)(i)(C) of this section must be reported in writing to the Twin Cities Ecological Service Field Office, 4101 American Boulevard East, Bloomington, Minnesota, 55425, or by facsimile (612) 725-3609 within 5 days. The specimen may only be retained, disposed of, or salvaged in accordance with directions from the Service.

(E) Any employee or agent of the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, when operating under a Cooperative Agreement with the Service signed in accordance with section 6(c) of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, who is designated by the Service or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his or her official duties, take a gray wolf in Minnesota to carry out scientific research or conservation programs.

(ii) Export and commercial transactions. Except as may be authorized by a permit issued under § 17.32, no person may sell or offer for sale in interstate commerce, import or export, or in the course of a commercial activity transport, ship, carry, deliver, or receive any Minnesota gray wolf.

(iii) Unlawfully taken wolves. No person may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any means whatsoever, a gray wolf taken unlawfully in Minnesota, except that an employee or agent of the Service, or any other Federal land management agency, or the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, who is designated by his/her agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties, possess, deliver, carry, transport, or ship a gray wolf taken unlawfully in Minnesota.

(3) Permits. All permits available under § 17.32 (General Permits - Threatened Wildlife) are available with regard to the gray wolf in Minnesota. All the terms and provisions of § 17.32 apply to such permits issued under the authority of this paragraph (d)(3).

(e) African elephant (Loxodonta africana). This paragraph (e) applies to any specimen of the species Loxodonta africana whether live or dead, including any part or product thereof. The African Elephant Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4201 et. seq.), and any moratorium under that act, also applies. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(2) through (9) of this section, all of the prohibitions and exceptions in §§ 17.31 and 17.32 apply to the African elephant. Persons seeking to benefit from the exceptions provided in this paragraph (e) must demonstrate that they meet the criteria to qualify for the exceptions.

(1) Definitions. In this paragraph (e), antique means any item that meets all four criteria under section 10(h) of the Endangered Species Act (16 U.S.C. 1539(h)). Ivory means any African elephant tusk and any piece of an African elephant tusk. Raw ivory means any African elephant tusk, and any piece thereof, the surface of which, polished or unpolished, is unaltered or minimally carved. Worked ivory means any African elephant tusk, and any piece thereof, that is not raw ivory.

(2) Live animals and parts and products other than ivory and sport-hunted trophies. Live African elephants and African elephant parts and products other than ivory and sport-hunted trophies may be imported into or exported from the United States; sold or offered for sale in interstate or foreign commerce; and delivered, received, carried, transported, or shipped in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, provided the requirements in 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met.

(3) Interstate and foreign commerce of ivory. Except for antiques and certain manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory, sale or offer for sale of ivory in interstate or foreign commerce and delivery, receipt, carrying, transport, or shipment of ivory in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity is prohibited. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(5)(iii) and (e)(6) through (8) of this section, manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory may be sold or offered for sale in interstate or foreign commerce and delivered, received, carried, transported, or shipped in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, provided they meet all of the following criteria:

(i) If the item is located within the United States, the ivory was imported into the United States prior to January 18, 1990, or was imported into the United States under a Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) pre-Convention certificate with no limitation on its commercial use;

(ii) If the item is located outside the United States, the ivory was removed from the wild prior to February 26, 1976;

(iii) The ivory is a fixed or integral component or components of a larger manufactured or handcrafted item and is not in its current form the primary source of the value of the item, that is, the ivory does not account for more than 50 percent of the value of the item;

(iv) The ivory is not raw;

(v) The manufactured or handcrafted item is not made wholly or primarily of ivory, that is, the ivory component or components do not account for more than 50 percent of the item by volume;

(vi) The total weight of the ivory component or components is less than 200 grams; and

(vii) The item was manufactured or handcrafted before July 6, 2016.

(4) Import/export of raw ivory. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(6) through (9) of this section, raw ivory may not be imported into or exported from the United States.

(5) Import/export of worked ivory. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(6) through (9) of this section, worked ivory may not be imported into or exported from the United States unless it is contained in a musical instrument, or is part of a traveling exhibition, household move, or inheritance, and meets the following criteria:

(i) Musical instrument. Musical instruments that contain worked ivory may be imported into and exported from the United States without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32 of this part provided:

(A) The ivory was legally acquired prior to February 26, 1976;

(B) The instrument containing worked ivory is accompanied by a valid CITES musical instrument certificate or equivalent CITES document;

(C) The instrument is securely marked or uniquely identified so that authorities can verify that the certificate corresponds to the musical instrument in question; and

(D) The instrument is not sold, traded, or otherwise disposed of while outside the certificate holder's country of usual residence.

(ii) Traveling exhibition. Worked ivory that is part of a traveling exhibition may be imported into and exported from the United States without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32 provided:

(A) The ivory was legally acquired prior to February 26, 1976;

(B) The item containing worked ivory is accompanied by a valid CITES traveling exhibition certificate (see the requirements for traveling exhibition certificates at 50 CFR 23.49) or equivalent CITES document;

(C) The item containing ivory is securely marked or uniquely identified so that authorities can verify that the certificate corresponds to the item in question; and

(D) The item containing worked ivory is not sold, traded, or otherwise disposed of while outside the certificate holder's country of usual residence.

(iii) Household move or inheritance. Worked ivory may be imported into or exported from the United States without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32 for personal use as part of a household move or as part of an inheritance if the ivory was legally acquired prior to February 26, 1976, and the item is accompanied by a valid CITES pre-Convention certificate. It is unlawful to sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce or to deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity any African elephant ivory imported into the United States as part of a household move or inheritance. The exception in paragraph (e)(3) of this section regarding manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory does not apply to items imported or exported under this paragraph (e)(5)(iii) as part of a household move or inheritance.

(6) Sport-hunted trophies.

(i) African elephant sport-hunted trophies may be imported into the United States provided:

(A) The trophy was legally taken in an African elephant range country that declared an ivory export quota to the CITES Secretariat for the year in which the trophy animal was killed;

(B) A determination is made that the killing of the trophy animal will enhance the survival of the species and the trophy is accompanied by a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32;

(C) The trophy is legibly marked in accordance with 50 CFR part 23;

(D) The requirements in 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met; and

(E) No more than two African elephant sport-hunted trophies are imported by any hunter in a calendar year.

(ii) It is unlawful to sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce or to deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity any sport-hunted African elephant trophy. The exception in paragraph (e)(3) of this section regarding manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory does not apply to ivory imported or exported under this paragraph (e)(6) as part of a sport-hunted trophy.

(iii) Except as provided in paragraph (e)(9) of this section, raw ivory that was imported as part of a sport-hunted trophy may not be exported from the United States. Except as provided in paragraphs (e)(5), (e)(7), (e)(8), and (e)(9) of this section, worked ivory imported as a sport-hunted trophy may not be exported from the United States. Parts of a sport-hunted trophy other than ivory may be exported from the United States without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, provided the requirements of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met.

(7) Import/export of ivory for law enforcement purposes. Raw or worked ivory may be imported into and worked ivory may be exported from the United States by an employee or agent of a Federal, State, or tribal government agency for law enforcement purposes, without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, provided the requirements of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met. It is unlawful to sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce and to deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity any African elephant ivory that was imported into or exported from the United States for law enforcement purposes. The exception in paragraph (e)(3) of this section regarding manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory does not apply to ivory imported or exported under this paragraph (e)(7) for law enforcement purposes.

(8) Import/export of ivory for genuine scientific purposes.

(i) Raw or worked ivory may be imported into and worked ivory may be exported from the United States for genuine scientific purposes that will contribute to the conservation of the African elephant, provided:

(A) It is accompanied by a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32; and

(B) The requirements of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met.

(ii) It is unlawful to sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce and to deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity any African elephant ivory that was imported into or exported from the United States for genuine scientific purposes. The exception in paragraph (e)(3) of this section regarding manufactured or handcrafted items containing de minimis quantities of ivory does not apply to ivory imported or exported under this paragraph (e)(8) for genuine scientific purposes.

(9) Antique ivory. Antiques (as defined in paragraph (e)(1) of this section) are not subject to the provisions of this rule. Antiques containing or consisting of ivory may, therefore, be imported into or exported from the United States without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, provided the requirements of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, and 23 have been met. Nevertheless, nothing in this rule interprets or changes any provisions or prohibitions that may apply under the African Elephant Conservation Act (16 U.S.C. 4201 et seq.), regardless of the age of the item. Antiques that consist of or contain raw or worked ivory may similarly be sold or offered for sale in interstate or foreign commerce and delivered, received, carried, transported, or shipped in interstate or foreign commerce in the course of a commercial activity without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32.

(f) Leopard (Panthera pardus) (1) Except as noted in paragraph (f)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of § 17.31 of this part and exemptions of § 17.32 of this part shall apply to the leopard populations occurring in southern Africa to the south of a line running along the borders of the following countries: Gabon/Rio Muni; Gabon/Cameroon; Congo/Cameroon; Congo/Central African Republic; Zaire/Central African Republic; Zaire/Sudan; Uganda/Sudan; Kenya/Sudan; Kenya/Ethiopia; Kenya/Somalia.

(2) A sport-hunted leopard trophy legally taken after the effective date of this rulemaking, from the area south of the line delineated above, may be imported into the United States without a Threatened Species permit pursuant to § 17.32 of this part, provided that the applicable provisions of 50 CFR part 23 have been met.

(g) Utah prairie dog (Cynomys parvidens).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (g)(2) through (g)(6) of this section, all prohibitions of § 17.31(a) and (b) and exemptions of § 17.32 apply to the Utah prairie dog.

(2) A Utah prairie dog may be directly or intentionally taken as described in paragraphs (g)(3) and (4) of this section on agricultural lands, properties within 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles (mi)) of conservation lands, and areas where prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites.

(3) Agricultural lands and properties near conservation lands. When permitted by the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (UDWR), or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, direct or intentional take is allowed on private properties that are located within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation land, and on agricultural land. Records on permitted take will be maintained by the State (or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service), and made available to the Service upon request.

(i) Agricultural land.

(A) Take may be permitted only on agricultural land being physically or economically affected by Utah prairie dogs, and only when the spring count on the agricultural lands is seven or more individuals, and only during the period of June 15 to December 31; and

(B) The land must:

(1) Meet the general classification of irrigated, dryland, grazing land, orchard, or meadow;

(2) Be capable of producing crops or forage;

(3) Be at least 2 contiguous hectares (5 contiguous acres) in area (smaller parcels may qualify where devoted to agricultural use in conjunction with other eligible acreage under identical legal ownership);

(4) Be managed in such a way that there is a reasonable expectation of profit;

(5) Have been devoted to agricultural use for at least 2 successive years immediately preceding the year in which application is made; and

(6) Meet State average annual (per-acre) production requirements.

(ii) Private property near conservation land.

(A) Take may be permitted on private properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of Utah prairie dog conservation land during the period of June 15 to December 31.

(B) Conservation lands are defined as non-Federal areas set aside for the preservation of Utah prairie dogs and are managed specifically or primarily toward that purpose. Conservation lands may include, but are not limited to, properties set aside as conservation banks, fee-title purchased properties, properties under conservation easements, and properties subject to a safe harbor agreement (see § 17.22). Conservation lands do not include Federal lands.

(iii) Amount of permitted take on agricultural lands and private property near conservation land.

(A) The UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will ensure that permitted take on agricultural lands and properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands does not exceed 10 percent of the estimated rangewide population annually.

(B) On agricultural lands, the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will limit permitted take to 7 percent of the estimated annual rangewide population and will limit within-colony take to one-half of a colony's estimated annual production. The UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will spatially distribute the 7 percent allowed take on agricultural lands across the three Recovery Units, based on the distribution of the total annual population estimate within each Recovery Unit.

(C) In setting take limits on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands, the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will consider the amount of take that occurs on agricultural lands. The State, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service, will restrict the remaining permitted take (the amount that would bring the total take up to 10 percent of the estimated annual rangewide population) on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands to animals in excess of the baseline population. The baseline population of these lands is determined in accordance with paragraph (g)(3)(iii)(D) of this section.

(D) Take on properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands is restricted to prairie dogs in excess of the baseline population. The baseline population is the highest estimated total (summer) population size on that property during the 5 years prior to the establishment of the conservation property, except that if no UDWR surveys to determine population size on a property were conducted during such 5-year period, the baseline population is the estimated total (summer) population size on that property as determined in the first survey conducted after the establishment of the conservation property. The baseline population will be established by the UDWR, or other parties as authorized in writing by the Service.

(E) Translocated Utah prairie dogs will count toward the take limits in paragraphs (g)(3)(iii)(A) through (D) of this section.

(iv) Methods of allowed direct take on agricultural lands and private properties near conservation land. Methods for controlling Utah prairie dogs on agricultural lands and properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands are limited to activities associated with translocation efforts by trained and permitted individuals complying with current Service-approved guidance, trapping intended for lethal removal, and shooting. Actions intended to drown or poison Utah prairie dogs and the use of gas cartridges, anticoagulants, and explosive devices are prohibited.

(4) Human safety hazards and significant human cultural or human burial sites.

(i) Nonlethal take is allowed where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, if approved in writing by the Service. To reduce hazards, prairie dog burrows may be filled with dirt if they are directly creating human hazards or disturbing the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites. Utah prairie dogs also may be translocated from these sites to approved translocation sites by properly trained personnel using Service-approved translocation protocols.

(ii) Direct or intentional lethal take is allowed where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, but only after all practicable measures to resolve the conflict are implemented, and only as approved in writing by the Service. A permit is not required to allow take under these conditions.

(A) All practicable measures means, with respect to these situations:

(1) Construction of prairie-dog-proof fence, above and below grade to specifications approved by the Service, around the area in which there is concern.

(2) Translocation of Utah prairie dogs out of the fenced area in which there is a concern must be conducted prior to allowing lethal take. Lethal take is allowed only to remove prairie dogs that remain in these areas after the measures to fence and translocate are successfully carried out.

(3) Continued maintenance or modification of the fence as needed to preclude Utah prairie dogs from entering the fenced sites.

(B) There are no restrictions on the amount, timing, or methods of lethal take allowed on lands where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites, as long as all qualifications in paragraphs (g)(4)(ii)(A)(1)through (3) of this section are met.

(C) The amount of take in areas where Utah prairie dogs create serious human safety hazards or disturb the sanctity of significant human cultural or human burial sites does not contribute to the upper permitted take limits described above for agricultural lands and private properties within 0.8 km (0.5 mi) of conservation lands.

(5) Incidental take associated with agriculture. Utah prairie dogs may be taken when take is incidental to otherwise-legal activities associated with legal and standard agricultural practices on legitimately operating agricultural lands. Acceptable practices include plowing to depths that do not exceed 46 cm (18 in.), discing, harrowing, irrigating crops, mowing, harvesting, and bailing, as long as the activities are not intended to eradicate Utah prairie dogs. There is no numeric limit established for incidental take associated with standard agricultural practices. Incidental take is in addition to, and does not contribute to, the take limits described in paragraphs (g)(2) through (4) of this section. A permit is not required for incidental take associated with agricultural practices.

(6) If the Service receives evidence that take pursuant to paragraphs (g)(2) through (5) of this section is having an effect that is inconsistent with the conservation of the Utah prairie dog, the Service may immediately prohibit or restrict such take as appropriate for the conservation of the species. The Service will notify the permitting entities in writing if take restrictions are necessary.

(h) Mountain lion (Felis concolor). (1) Except as allowed in paragraphs (h)(2), (h)(3), and (h)(4) of this section, no person shall take any free-living mountain lion (Felis concolor) in Florida.

(2) A mountain lion (Felis concolor) may be taken in this area under a valid threatened species permit issued pursuant to 50 CFR 17.52.

(3) A mountain lion (Felis concolor) may be taken in Florida by an employee or designated agent of the Service or the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission for taxonomic identification or other reasons consistent with the conservation of the endangered Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi). When it has been established by the Service, in consultation with the State, that an animal in question is not a Florida panther (Felis concolor coryi) or an eastern cougar (Felis concolor couguar), such animals may be removed from the wild. The disposition of animals so taken shall be at the discretion of the Florida Game and Fresh Water Fish Commission, with the concurrence of the Fish and Wildlife Service.

(4) Take for reasons of human safety is allowed as specified under 50 CFR 17.21(c)(2) and 17.21(c)(3)(iv).

(5) Any take pursuant to paragraph (h)(4) of this section must be reported in writing to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Office of Law Enforcement, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, LE-3000, Arlington, VA 22203, within 5 days. The specimen may only be retained, disposed of, or salvaged in accordance with directions from the Service.

(i) [Reserved]

(j) Argali (Ovis ammon) in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan. (1) Except as noted in paragraph (j)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of § 17.31 of this part and exemptions of § 17.32 of this part shall apply to this species in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan

(Note.

In all other parts of its range the argali is classified as endangered and covered by § 17.21).

(2) Upon receiving from the governments of Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan properly documented and verifiable certification that (i) argali populations in those countries are sufficiently large to sustain sport hunting, (ii) regulating authorities have the capacity to obtain sound data on these populations, (iii) regulating authorities recognize these populations as a valuable resource and have the legal and practical capacity to manage them as such, (iv) the habitat of these populations is secure, (v) regulating authorities can ensure that the involved trophies have in fact been legally taken from the specified populations, and (vi) funds derived from the involved sport hunting are applied primarily to argali conservation, the Director may, consistent with the purposes of the Act, authorize by publication of a notice in the Federal Register the importation of personal sport-hunted argali trophies, taken legally in Kyrgyzstan, Mongolia, and Tajikistan after the date of such notice, without a Threatened Species permit pursuant to § 17.32 of this part, provided that the applicable provisions of 50 CFR part 23 have been met.

(k) Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis). (1) What lynx does this special rule apply to? The regulations in this paragraph (k) apply to all wild and captive lynx in the contiguous United States.

(2) What activities are prohibited for wild lynx? All prohibitions and provisions of 50 CFR 17.31 and 17.32 apply to wild lynx found in the contiguous United States.

(3) What is considered a captive lynx? (i) For purposes of this paragraph (k), captive lynx means lynx, whether alive or dead, and any part or product, if the specimen was in captivity at the time of the listing, born in captivity, or lawfully imported or transported into the contiguous United States.

(ii) Lynx that were either born or held in captivity and then released into the wild are considered wild.

(4) What activities are allowed for captive lynx? (i) Take. You may take lawfully obtained captive lynx without a permit.

(ii) Import and export. You may export captive live lynx, parts or products of captive lynx provided the specimens are tagged with Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) export tags and/or accompanied by a valid CITES export permit. You may import lawfully obtained lynx that originated outside the United States when you follow the requirements of CITES.

(iii) Interstate commerce. You may deliver, receive, carry, transport, ship, sell, offer to sell, purchase, or offer to purchase in interstate commerce captive lynx and captive lynx parts and products in accordance with State or tribal laws and regulations. In addition, lynx pelts that are properly tagged with valid CITES export tags also qualify for this exemption on interstate commerce.

(5) Are any activities not allowed or restricted for captive lynx? You must comply with all applicable State and tribal laws and regulations. Violation of State or tribal law will also be a violation of the Act.

(l) Preble's meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius preblei). (1) What is the definition of take? To harass, harm, pursue, hunt, shoot, wound, trap, kill, or collect; or attempt to engage in any such conduct. Incidental take is that which occurs when it is incidental to and not the purpose of an otherwise lawful activity. Any take that is not authorized by permit provided through section 7 or section 10 of the Act or that is not covered by the exemptions described below is considered illegal take.

(2) When is take of Preble's meadow jumping mice allowed? Take of Preble's meadow jumping mice resulting from the following legally conducted activities, in certain circumstances as described below, is allowed:

(i) Take under permits. Any person with a valid permit issued by the Service under § 17.32 may take Preble's meadow jumping mice pursuant to the terms of the permit.

(ii) Rodent control. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to rodent control undertaken within 10 feet of or inside any structure. “Rodent control” includes control of mice and rats by trapping, capturing, or otherwise physically capturing or killing, or poisoning by any substance registered with the Environmental Protection Agency as required by the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 136) and applied consistent with its labeling. “Structure” includes but is not limited to any building, stable, grain silo, corral, barn, shed, water or sewage treatment equipment or facility, enclosed parking structure, shelter, gazebo, bandshell, or restroom complex.

(iii) Established, ongoing agricultural activities. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to agricultural activities, including grazing, plowing, seeding, cultivating, minor drainage, burning, mowing, and harvesting, as long as these activities are established, ongoing activities and do not increase impacts to or further encroach upon the Preble's meadow jumping mouse or its habitat. New agricultural activities or those that expand the footprint or intensity of the activity are not considered to be established, ongoing activities.

(iv) Maintenance and replacement of existing landscaping. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to the maintenance and replacement of any landscaping and related structures and improvements, as long as they are currently in place and no increase in impervious surfaces would result from their maintenance and improvement. Construction of new structures or improvements or expansion of the landscaping in a manner that increases impervious surfaces would not be considered maintenance and replacement of existing landscaping.

(v) Existing uses of water. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidentally as a result of existing uses of water associated with the exercise of perfected water rights pursuant to State law and interstate compacts and decrees. (A “perfected water right” is a right that has been put to beneficial use and has been permitted, decreed, or adjudicated pursuant to State law.) Increasing the use or altering the location of use of an existing water right would not be considered an existing use of water.

(vi) Noxious weed control. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to noxious weed control that is conducted in accordance with:

(A) Federal law, including Environmental Protection Agency label restrictions;

(B) Applicable State laws for noxious weed control;

(C) Applicable county bulletins;

(D) Herbicide application guidelines as prescribed by herbicide manufacturers; and

(E) Any future revisions to the authorities listed in paragraphs (l)(2)(vi)(A) through (D) of this section that apply to the herbicides proposed for use within the species' range.

(vii) Ditch maintenance activities. Preble's meadow jumping mice may be taken incidental to normal and customary ditch maintenance activities only if the activities:

(A) Result in the annual loss of no more than 1/4 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch, including burning of ditches that results in the annual loss of no more than 1/4 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch.

(B) Are performed within the historic footprint of the surface disturbance associated with ditches and related infrastructure, and

(C) Follow the Best Management Practices described in paragraphs (l)(2)(vii)(C)(1) through (3) of this section.

(1) Persons engaged in ditch maintenance activities shall avoid, to the maximum extent practicable, impacts to shrub vegetation. For example, if accessing the ditch for maintenance or repair activities from an area containing no shrubs is possible, then damage to adjacent shrub vegetation shall be avoided.

(2) Persons engaged in placement or sidecasting of silt and debris removed during ditch cleaning, vegetation or mulch from mowing or cutting, and other material from ditch maintenance shall, to the maximum extent practicable, avoid shrub habitat and at no time disturb more than 1/4 mile of riparian shrub habitat per linear mile of ditch within any calendar year.

(3) To the maximum extent practicable, all ditch maintenance activities should be carried out during the Preble's hibernation season, November through April.

(D) All ditch maintenance activities carried out during the Preble's active season, May through October, should be conducted during daylight hours only.

(E) Ditch maintenance activities that would result in permanent or long-term loss of potential habitat that would not be considered normal or customary include replacement of existing infrastructure with components of substantially different materials and design, such as replacement of open ditches with pipeline or concrete-lined ditches, replacement of an existing gravel access road with a permanently paved road, or replacement of an earthen diversion structure with a rip-rap and concrete structure, and construction of new infrastructure or the movement of existing infrastructure to new locations, such as realignment of a ditch, building a new access road, or installation of new diversion works where none previously existed.

(3) When is take of Preble's not allowed? (i) Any manner of take not described under paragraph (l)(2) of this section.

(ii) No person may import or export, ship in interstate commerce in the course of commercial activity, or sell or offer for sale in interstate or foreign commerce any Preble's meadow jumping mice.

(iii) No person, except for an authorized person, may possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship any Preble's meadow jumping mice that have been taken illegally.

(4) Where does this rule apply? The take exemptions provided by this rule are applicable within the entire range of the Preble's meadow jumping mouse.

(m) Vicuña (Vicugna vicugna) - (1) What activities involving vicuña are prohibited by this rule? (i) Appendix I populations. All provisions of § 17.31 (a) and (b) and § 17.32 apply to vicuña and vicuña parts and products originating from populations currently listed in Appendix I of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

(ii) Import, export, and re-export. Except as provided in paragraph (m)(2) of this section, it is unlawful to import, export, or re-export, or present for export or re-export without valid permits as required under parts 17 and 23 of this subchapter, any vicuña or vicuña parts and products. For import of embryos, blood, other tissue samples, or live vicuña, permits required under § 17.32 and part 23 will be issued only for bona fide scientific research contributing to the conservation of the species in the wild.

(iii) Other activities. Except as provided in paragraph (m)(2) of this section, it is unlawful to sell or offer for sale, deliver, receive, carry, transport, or ship in interstate or foreign commerce and in the course of a commercial activity any vicuña or vicuña parts and products.

(iv) It is unlawful for any person subject to the jurisdiction of the United States to commit, attempt to commit, solicit to commit, or cause to be committed any acts described in paragraphs (m)(1)(ii)-(iii) of this section.

(2) What activities involving vicuña are allowed by this rule? You may import, export, or re-export, or conduct interstate or foreign commerce in raw wool sheared from live vicuñas, cloth made from such wool, or manufactured or handicraft products and articles made from or consisting of such wool or cloth without a threatened species permit issued according to § 17.32 only when the following provisions have been met:

(i) The specimens originated from a population listed in CITES Appendix II.

(ii) The provisions in parts 13, 14, and 23 of this subchapter are met, including the specific labeling provisions in part 23.

(iii) Personal and household effects. Under the provisions of this special rule, raw wool sheared from live vicuñas, cloth made from such wool, or manufactured or handicraft products and articles made from or consisting of such wool or cloth are not granted the personal or household effects exemption described in part 23 of this subchapter. In addition to the provisions of this paragraph (m)(2), such specimens may only be imported, exported, or re-exported when accompanied by a valid CITES document.

(iv) Labeling of wool sheared from live vicuñas. Any shipment of raw wool sheared from live vicuñas must be sealed with a tamper-proof seal and have the following:

(A) An identification tag with a code identifying the country of origin of the raw vicuña wool and the CITES export permit number; and

(B) The vicuña logotype as defined in 50 CFR part 23 and the words “VICUÑA - COUNTRY OF ORIGIN”, where country of origin is the name of the country from which the raw vicuña wool was first exported.

(v) At the time of import, the country of origin and each country of re-export involved in the trade of a particular shipment have not been identified by the CITES Conference of the Parties, the CITES Standing Committee, or in a Notification from the CITES Secretariat as a country from which Parties should not accept permits.

(3) When and how will the Service inform the public of additional restrictions in trade of vicuña? Except in rare cases involving extenuating circumstances that do not adversely affect the conservation of the species, we will issue a public bulletin that identifies a restriction on trade in specimens of vicuña addressed in this paragraph (m) if any of the following criteria are met:

(i) The country is identified in any action adopted by the Conference of the Parties to the Convention, the Convention's Standing Committee, or in a Notification issued by the CITES Secretariat, whereby Parties are asked not to accept shipments of specimens of any CITES-listed species from the country in question.

(ii) The Service's Division of Scientific Authority administratively determines that the conservation or management status of threatened vicuña populations in a range country has changed, such that continued recovery of the vicuña population in that country may be compromised, as a result of one or more of the following factors:

(A) A change in range country laws or regulations that lessens protection for vicuña;

(B) A change in range country management programs that lessens protection for vicuña;

(C) A documented decline in wild vicuña population numbers;

(D) A documented increase in poaching of vicuña;

(E) A documented decline in vicuña habitat quality or quantity; or

(F) Other natural or man-made factors affecting the species' recovery.

(4) What must vicuña range countries do in order to be authorized under the special rule to export to the United States? -

(i) Annual Report. Range country governments (Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, and Peru) wishing to export specimens of vicuña to the United States will need to provide an annual report containing the most recent information available on the status of the species, following the information guidelines specified below. The first submission of a status report will be required as of July 1, 2003, and every year thereafter on the anniversary of that date. For each range country, the following information should be provided in the annual report:

(A) A description of any revisions to the management program, especially any changes in management approaches or emphasis;

(B) New information obtained in the last year on vicuña distribution, population status, or population trends, for the country as a whole or for specific protected areas, and a detailed description of the methodology used to obtain such information;

(C) Results of any research projects concluded in the last year on the biology of vicuña in the wild, particularly its population biology, habitat use, and genetics, and a description of any new research projects undertaken on the biology of vicuña in the wild, particularly its population biology, habitat use, and genetics;

(D) A description of any changes to national and/or provincial laws and programs relating to vicuña conservation, in particular those laws and regulations related to harvest and use of the vicuña, and export of vicuña parts and products;

(E) A description of any changes in the number or size of natural reserves or national parks that provide protected habitat for the vicuña;

(F) A summary of law enforcement activities undertaken in the last year, and a description of any changes in programs to prevent poaching, smuggling, and illegal commercialization of the vicuña;

(G) A description of the current management and harvest (or “sustainable use”) programs for wild populations of the vicuña, including: any changes in the location and population size of wild populations being managed for sustainable use; any changes in the harvest management practices being used for each population; any changes in current harvest quotas for wild populations, if any; any changes in protocols for translocations undertaken as part of the use program; a summary of the specific financial costs of and revenues generated by the sustainable use program over the last year; and a summary of documented conservation benefits resulting from the sustainable use program over the last year;

(H) A description of current management and harvest (or “sustainable use”) programs for captive and so-called “semi-captive” populations of the vicuña, including: any changes in the number and location of all captive and “semi-captive” populations; any changes in the size (ha) of each captive enclosure and the number of vicuña maintained therein; any changes in protocols for translocations undertaken as part of the use program; a summary of the financial costs of and revenues generated by the sustainable use program over the last year; and documented conservation benefits resulting from the sustainable use program over the last year (information on captive and “semi-captive” populations must be separate from that provided for wild populations); and

(I) Export data for the last year.

(ii) The Service's Division of Scientific Authority will conduct a review every 2 years, using information in the annual reports, to determine whether range country management programs are effectively achieving conservation benefits for the vicuña. Failure to submit an annual report could result in a restriction on trade in specimens of vicuña as addressed in paragraph (m)(3) of this section. Based on information contained in the annual reports and any other pertinent information it has available, the Service may restrict trade from a range country, as addressed in paragraph (m)(3) of this section, if it determines that the conservation or management status of threatened vicuña populations in a range country has changed, such that continued recovery of the vicuña population in that country may be compromised. Trade restrictions may result from one or more of the following factors:

(A) A change in range country laws or regulations that lessens protection for vicuña;

(B) A change in range country management programs that lessens protection for vicuña;

(C) A documented decline in wild vicuña population numbers;

(D) A documented increase in poaching of vicuña;

(E) A documented decline in vicuña habitat quality or quantity; or

(F) Other natural or man-made factors affecting the species' recovery.

(n) Straight-horned markhor (Capra falconeri megaceros).

(1) General requirements. Except as noted in paragraph (n)(2) of this section, all prohibitions of § 17.31 and exemptions of § 17.32 apply to this subspecies.

(2) What are the criteria under which a personal sport-hunted trophy may qualify for import without a permit under § 17.32? The Director may, consistent with the purposes of the Act, authorize by publication of a notice in the Federal Register the importation, without a threatened species permit issued under § 17.32, of personal sport-hunted straight-horned markhor from an established conservation program that meets the following criteria:

(i) The markhor was taken legally from the established program after the date of the Federal Register notice;

(ii) The applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, 17, and 23 have been met; and

(iii) The Director has received the following information regarding the established conservation program for straight-horned markhor:

(A) Populations of straight-horned markhor within the conservation program's areas can be shown to be sufficiently large to sustain sport hunting and are stable or increasing.

(B) Regulatory authorities have the capacity to obtain sound data on populations.

(C) The conservation program can demonstrate a benefit to both the communities surrounding or within the area managed by the conservation program and the species, and the funds derived from sport hunting are applied toward benefits to the community and the species.

(D) Regulatory authorities have the legal and practical capacity to provide for the long-term survival of the populations.

(E) Regulatory authorities can determine that the sport-hunted trophies have in fact been legally taken from the populations under an established conservation program.

(o) Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis). The provisions of this rule are based upon the occurrence of white-nose syndrome (WNS), a disease affecting many U.S. bat populations. The term “WNS zone” identifies the set of counties within the range of the northern long-eared bat within 150 miles of the boundaries of U.S. counties or Canadian districts where the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) or WNS has been detected. For current information regarding the WNS zone, contact your local Service ecological services field office. Field office contact information may be obtained from the Service regional offices, the addresses of which are listed in 50 CFR 2.2.

(1) Prohibitions. The following prohibitions apply to the northern long-eared bat:

(i) Purposeful take of northern long-eared bat, including capture, handling, or other activities.

(ii) Within the WNS zone:

(A) Actions that result in the incidental take of northern long-eared bats in known hibernacula.

(B) Actions that result in the incidental take of northern long-eared bats by altering a known hibernaculum's entrance or interior environment if it impairs an essential behavioral pattern, including sheltering northern long-eared bats.

(C) Tree-removal activities that result in the incidental take of northern long-eared bats when the activity:

(1) Occurs within 0.25 mile (0.4 kilometer) of a known hibernaculum; or

(2) Cuts or destroys known occupied maternity roost trees, or any other trees within a 150-foot (45-meter) radius from the maternity roost tree, during the pup season (June 1 through July 31).

(iii) Possession and other acts with unlawfully taken northern long-eared bats. It is unlawful to possess, sell, deliver, carry, transport, or ship, by any means whatsoever, any northern long-eared bat that was taken in violation of this section or State laws.

(iv) Import and export.

(2) Exceptions from prohibitions.

(i) Any person may take a northern long-eared bat in defense of his own life or the lives of others, including for public health monitoring purposes.

(ii) Any person may take a northern long-eared bat that results from the removal of hazardous trees for the protection of human life and property.

(iii) Any person may take a northern long-eared bat by removing it from human structures, but only if the actions comply with all applicable State regulations.

(iv) Purposeful take that results from actions relating to capture, handling, and related activities for northern long-eared bats by individuals permitted to conduct these same activities for other species of bat until May 3, 2016.

(v) All of the provisions of § 17.32 apply to the northern long-eared bat.

(vi) Any employee or agent of the Service, of the National Marine Fisheries Service, or of a State conservation agency that is operating a conservation program pursuant to the terms of a cooperative agreement with the Service in accordance with section 6(c) of the Act, who is designated by his agency for such purposes, may, when acting in the course of his official duties, take northern long-eared bats covered by an approved cooperative agreement to carry out conservation programs.

(p) Northern sea otter (Enhydra lutris kenyoni). (1) To what population of sea otter does this special rule apply? The regulations in paragraph (p) of this section apply to the southwest Alaska distinct population segment (DPS) of the northern sea otter as set forth at § 17.11(h) of this part.

(2) What provisions apply to this DPS? Except as noted in paragraph (p)(3) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§ 17.31 and 17.32 of this part apply to the southwest Alaska DPS of the northern sea otter.

(3) What additional activities are allowed for this DPS? In addition to the activities authorized under paragraph (p)(2) of this section, you may conduct any activity authorized or exempted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.) with a part or product of a southwest Alaska DPS northern sea otter, provided that:

(i) The product qualifies as an authentic native article of handicrafts or clothing as defined in § 17.3 of this part; and

(A) It was created by an Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan

Native, and

(B) It is not being exported or imported for commercial purposes; or

(ii) The part or product is owned by an Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo who is an Alaskan Native and resides in Alaska, or by a Native inhabitant of Russia, Canada, or Greenland, and is part of a cultural exchange; or

(iii) The product is owned by a Native inhabitant of Russia, Canada, or Greenland, and is in conjunction with travel for noncommercial purposes; or

(iv) The part or product has been received or acquired by a person registered as an agent or tannery under § 18.23 of this subchapter.

(4) What other wildlife regulations may apply? All applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 14, 18, and 23 must be met.

(q) Polar bear (Ursus maritimus).

(1) Except as noted in paragraphs (q)(2) and (4) of this section, all prohibitions and provisions of §§ 17.31 and 17.32 of this part apply to the polar bear.

(2) None of the prohibitions in § 17.31 of this part apply to any activity that is authorized or exempted under the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) (16 U.S.C. 1361 et seq.), the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) (27 U.S.T. 1087), or both, provided that the person carrying out the activity has complied with all terms and conditions that apply to that activity under the provisions of the MMPA and CITES and their implementing regulations.

(3) All applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 14, 18, and 23 must be met.

(4) None of the prohibitions in § 17.31of this part apply to any taking of polar bears that is incidental to, but not the purpose of, carrying out an otherwise lawful activity within the United States, except for any incidental taking caused by activities in areas subject to the jurisdiction or sovereign rights of the United States within the current range of the polar bear.

(r) Lion (Panthera leo melanochaita).

(1) General requirements. All prohibitions and provisions of §§ 17.31 and 17.32 apply to this subspecies.

(2) The import exemption found in § 17.8 for threatened wildlife listed in Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) does not apply to this subspecies. A threatened species import permit under § 17.32 is required for the importation of all specimens of Panthera leo melanochaita.

(3) All applicable provisions of 50 CFR parts 13, 14, 17, and 23 must be met.

[40 FR 44415, Sept. 26, 1975]
Editorial Note:
For Federal Register citations affecting § 17.40, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www.fdsys.gov.

This is a list of United States Code sections, Statutes at Large, Public Laws, and Presidential Documents, which provide rulemaking authority for this CFR Part.

This list is taken from the Parallel Table of Authorities and Rules provided by GPO [Government Printing Office].

It is not guaranteed to be accurate or up-to-date, though we do refresh the database weekly. More limitations on accuracy are described at the GPO site.


United States Code
U.S. Code: Title 16 - CONSERVATION

§ 1361 - Congressional findings and declaration of policy

§ 1362 - Definitions

§ 1371 - Moratorium on taking and importing marine mammals and marine mammal products

§ 1372 - Prohibitions

§ 1373 - Regulations on taking of marine mammals

§ 1374 - Permits

§ 1375 - Penalties

§ 1375a - Use of fines for protection and recovery of manatees, polar bears, sea otters, and walruses

§ 1376 - Seizure and forfeiture of cargo

§ 1377 - Enforcement

§ 1378 - International program

§ 1379 - Transfer of management authority

§ 1380 - Marine mammal research grants

§ 1381 - Commercial fisheries gear development

§ 1382 - Regulations and administration

§ 1383 - Application to other treaties and conventions

§ 1383a - Interim exemption for commercial fisheries

§ 1383b - Status review; conservation plans

§ 1384 - Authorization of appropriations

§ 1385 - Dolphin protection

§ 1386 - Stock assessments

§ 1387 - Taking of marine mammals incidental to commercial fishing operations

§ 1388 - Marine mammal cooperative agreements in Alaska

§ 1389 - Pacific Coast Task Force; Gulf of Maine

§ 1401 - Establishment

§ 1402 - Duties of Commission

§ 1403 - Committee of Scientific Advisors on Marine Mammals

§ 1404 - Omitted

§ 1405 - Coordination with other Federal agencies

§ 1406 - Administration

§ 1407 - Authorization of appropriations

§ 1531 - Congressional findings and declaration of purposes and policy

§ 1532 - Definitions

§ 1533 - Determination of endangered species and threatened species

§ 1534 - Land acquisition

§ 1535 - Cooperation with States

§ 1536 - Interagency cooperation

§ 1537 - International cooperation

§ 1537a - Convention implementation

§ 1538 - Prohibited acts

§ 1539 - Exceptions

§ 1540 - Penalties and enforcement

§ 1541 - Endangered plants

§ 1542 - Authorization of appropriations

§ 1543 - Construction with Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972

§ 1544 - Annual cost analysis by Fish and Wildlife Service

§ 4201 - Statement of purpose

§ 4202 - Findings

§ 4203 - Statement of policy

§ 4211 - Provision of assistance

§ 4212 - Acceptance and use of donations

§ 4213 - Omitted

§ 4214 - Advisory group

§ 4221 - Review of African elephant conservation programs

§ 4222 - Moratoria

§ 4223 - Prohibited acts

§ 4224 - Penalties and enforcement

§ 4225 - Rewards

§ 4241 - Relationship to Endangered Species Act of 1973

§ 4242 - Certification under Pelly amendment

§ 4243 - Repealed. Pub. L. 107–111, § 6(a)(3), Jan. 8, 2002, 115 Stat. 2096

§ 4244 - Definitions

§ 4245 - Authorization of appropriations

Title 50 published on 2015-10-01

The following are ALL rules, proposed rules, and notices (chronologically) published in the Federal Register relating to 50 CFR Part 17 after this date.

  • 2016-11-02; vol. 81 # 212 - Wednesday, November 2, 2016
    1. 81 FR 76311 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Adding Ten Species and Updating Five Species on the List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife
      GPO FDSys XML | Text
      DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, Fish and Wildlife Service
      Final rule.
      This rule is effective November 2, 2016. Applicability date: The three coral and dusky sea snake listings were applicable as of November 6, 2015. The Banggai cardinalfish listing was applicable as of February 19, 2016. The Tanzanian DPS of African coelacanth listing was applicable as of April 28, 2016. The Nassau grouper listing was applicable as of July 29, 2016. The three angelshark listings were applicable as of August 31, 2016. The critical habitat designations for the Puget Sound-Georgia Basin canary rockfish ( Sebastes pinniger ) and Puget Sound-Georgia Basin yelloweye rockfish ( Sebastes ruberrimus ) were applicable as of February 11, 2015. The critical habitat designations for the lower Columbia River coho salmon ( Oncorhynchus kisutch ) and the Puget Sound steelhead ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) were applicable as of March 25, 2016. The applicable rule citation for the North Atlantic right whale ( Eubalaena glacialis ) was applicable as of December 6, 2013.
      50 CFR Part 17

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